Help me pick a martial art.

polm

Diamond Member
May 24, 2001
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I am 24 years old and I have been doing HIIT (High Intensity / MAX-OT) Weight Training and Cardio for about 6 months.

I would like to start taking a martial art that will mesh with my current exercise routine.

What martial arts lend themselves to helping me gain Strength and Flexibility without having a serious negative impact on my weight training ? I like to do short cardio workouts that don't dip into my muscle reserves.

I am really looking for a martial art that is fun and interesting, increases flexibilty, involves a semi-spiritual approach (meditation, etc) .

Something that I can practice on my own would be nice too.
 

bradruth

Lifer
Aug 9, 2002
13,479
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Before reading you're post I was going to say Jiu Jitsu (sp?), but it doesn't sound like you're looking for defense. I took Tae Kwon Do when I was a kid, and I got pretty flexible and had better endurance and strength. It seems to be pretty easy to get into, and since it's focused on balance and kicking it's not really a "combat" martial art.
 

Saulbadguy

Diamond Member
Jan 27, 2003
5,573
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Try "Kung Fu".

All you have to learn is the low kick, kick, jump kick , and punch. You also get to make funny "HOO HOO HOO" noises everytime you kick.
 

WobbleWobble

Diamond Member
Jun 29, 2001
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Wing Chun (may be spelled differently at different places). It's a form of kung fu. It's practical and not a acrobatics type of self-defence. Great for street fighting.
 

kenshorin

Golden Member
Apr 14, 2001
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Well lets narrow the field a little... are you interested in a striking art, or a grappling art?

Interested in a mobile art (more speed / motion oriented, wushu, some quicker blends of karate) or rooted (gojuryu karate, etc)

What are your feelings on doing 'forms'? Or do you want more freestyle oriented MA?

Are weapons of any interest to you?

Does origin of art matter at all? (ie Korean, Japanese, Chinese)

I'm guessing you want a more traditional art, vs a more modern one since you mentioned meditation, and I am leaning towards you wanting an Asian art as well I'm guessing?

That said, the best way to find something is to go to schools and talk to the instructors. I'd rather have a good instructor in any old style than a bad instructor in the style of choice.
 

SagaLore

Elite Member
Dec 18, 2001
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I want to pick one too. I want one that spends most of it's focus using the Staff.
 

Czesia

Senior member
Nov 22, 2003
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Ever thought of Muay Thai kickboxing? It's an awesome workout, helps develop balance, strength and discipline, and it'll make you feel great!:)
 

Gyrene

Banned
Jun 6, 2002
2,841
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Tae Kwon Do is the perfect workout for gaining flexibility and leg strength. Note, I don't consider it a martial art, it is merely a great form of exercise.
 

amcdonald

Diamond Member
Feb 4, 2003
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Any martial art that you can practice on your own is going to be ineffective against other people or in a fight.
I'd say keep your workout the way it is, and take some different styles until you find a TEACHER you are impressed by.
Don't do 30-person karate classes, and don't take lessons that are expensive. Find someone who is teaching for the love of their art.
I'd recommend looking into grappling and stand-up fighting styles.
 

xeno2060

Golden Member
Nov 8, 2001
1,518
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I would suggest an Okinawian or Japanese Ballistic martial art ie. Goju-ryu, Shorin-ryu, or Okinawian Kenpo.:D
 

Babbles

Diamond Member
Jan 4, 2001
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Originally posted by: polm
I am 24 years old and I have been doing HIIT (High Intensity / MAX-OT) Weight Training and Cardio for about 6 months.

I would like to start taking a martial art that will mesh with my current exercise routine.

What martial arts lend themselves to helping me gain Strength and Flexibility without having a serious negative impact on my weight training ? I like to do short cardio workouts that don't dip into my muscle reserves.

I am really looking for a martial art that is fun and interesting, increases flexibilty, involves a semi-spiritual approach (meditation, etc) .

Something that I can practice on my own would be nice too.
Okay going to try to be serious here.

First off here are a few hints: if you see coupon flyers for some martial arts class, avoid them; if you see a lot of trophies, avoid them.

Okay, your current exercise routine would not really be impacted by any martial arts. Granted the healthier and better physical shape you are in may make a difference in your martial arts but most things really are based on your technique.
For instance the jujutsu I study, there are a few guys who go to the gym darn well everyday, some that are tall some that are short, some older some younger. It really depends on your practice and your technique; therefore with you on a cutting phase and doing HIT cardio most martial arts will not impact your workout routine one way or another.

The spirituality of your martial art is just dependent on your instructor and class. Again for instance with whom I practice we are somewhat zen spiritually active. We practice sitting meditation (zazen), calligraphy (shodo), breathing excercises and some of us also practicie the shakuhachi (Japanese bamboo flute). So it is hard do say that all jujutsu ryu do this, other karate schools do something else, aikido people do the next thing, kung fu folks all do whatever else.

You just need to ask around and find what is happening in your local area.

HERE is a link for a forum for more traditional Japanese arts, maybe you can find somebody there in your area that can be of great help.
 

kenshorin

Golden Member
Apr 14, 2001
1,160
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Originally posted by: Babbles

First off here are a few hints: if you see coupon flyers for some martial arts class, avoid them; if you see a lot of trophies, avoid them.
...
HERE is a link for a forum for more traditional Japanese arts, maybe you can find somebody there in your area that can be of great help.
2 questions to ask the instructor when you go to any school - "How long have you been training in the primary art you teach" and "How long have you been teaching the primary art you teach"

Too often yesterday's Ninjutsu school becomes today's BJJ school becomes tomorrow's Krav Maga school... they teach the flavor of the month and hawk their wares with trophies and gimmicks. Avoid.

And I can vouch for e-budo, I'm a regular poster there as well, good place for traditional Japanese martial arts info.
 

Booster

Diamond Member
May 4, 2002
4,380
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Learn 'face beating when drunk in a crowded bar' martial art - the most difficult of all. No matter what you can do, kung fu etc, it won't work in such a situation when you're close to some suckers and they're all after you.
 

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