Have You Gotten Your Covid Vaccine? Thread.

Page 103 - Seeking answers? Join the AnandTech community: where nearly half-a-million members share solutions and discuss the latest tech.

ondma

Platinum Member
Mar 18, 2018
2,844
1,411
136
I’m fully vaccinated and boosted and I live my life as I did pre-covid. Unless you have some significant underlying risk factor it’s not a major health risk.
Maybe, although one can never be sure. There is also a fairly significant chance of long Covid (I saw an article this morning that put it at 25%.) I am vaxxed and double boosted, but still got Covid on a trip to Vegas. (yea, I know. But it was a celebration for my grand daughters 21st birthday.) I have no really serious risk factors except my age of 70+, and I was quite sick the first couple of days. I was able to get Paxlovid and recovered quickly from the acute symptoms, but still feel tired and mentally stressed. It has been over 2 weeks now since I first tested positive, and I still dont feel back to normal.

Not to mention it was just a major pain in the ass to isolate and test repeatedly, especially since I had to try to keep my wife from getting it (she never did).
 

ondma

Platinum Member
Mar 18, 2018
2,844
1,411
136
To further clarify, I found getting Covid more serious than I expected it would be, since I was double vaxxed and double boosted. It was definitely more serious and inconveniencing than simply getting a common cold. Going forward, I will still take precautions like wearing a mask indoors. I also was thinking of going back to the gym, but probably wont now. IMO, after having it, I dont feel it is necessary to totally change your life, but I will continue to wear a mask, and avoid certain activities like large indoor gatherings and high risk non-essential activities like going to the gym.

Trust me, as one who has just had it, Covid is something definitely worth taking reasonable precautions to avoid.
 
  • Like
Reactions: pcgeek11

Ajay

Lifer
Jan 8, 2001
16,094
8,106
136
Bah, I'm a moron. Forgot to get my second booster shot before travelling to Europe. Was going to get it today anyway, but the 1st booster kicked my ass. I don't want to be in that state while spending 8 hours on a flight and 3 hours on a high speed train, never mind spending 3 hours at the airport. My last trip to Europe was pre-9/11 and pre-Covid, so much easier.
 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
85,057
49,861
136
Maybe, although one can never be sure. There is also a fairly significant chance of long Covid (I saw an article this morning that put it at 25%.) I am vaxxed and double boosted, but still got Covid on a trip to Vegas. (yea, I know. But it was a celebration for my grand daughters 21st birthday.) I have no really serious risk factors except my age of 70+, and I was quite sick the first couple of days. I was able to get Paxlovid and recovered quickly from the acute symptoms, but still feel tired and mentally stressed. It has been over 2 weeks now since I first tested positive, and I still dont feel back to normal.

Not to mention it was just a major pain in the ass to isolate and test repeatedly, especially since I had to try to keep my wife from getting it (she never did).
I find those long COVID claims to be absurd and when you read the studies ‘long covid’ encompasses things like having body aches and feeling tired, also known as being old. It also doesn’t pass the smell test. Do we really think 50 million or so Americans are struggling with long COVID? If so why don’t I know any? I’m sure some people are affected by it but claims on it seem wildly overblown to me.

Anyway though my whole point is that everyone can do their own thing. I have taken essentially no precautions for the last year or so and unless something major changes will not take any precautions for the rest of my life outside of additional vaccination.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Brovane

pcgeek11

Lifer
Jun 12, 2005
21,535
4,620
136
I find those long COVID claims to be absurd and when you read the studies ‘long covid’ encompasses things like having body aches and feeling tired, also known as being old. It also doesn’t pass the smell test. Do we really think 50 million or so Americans are struggling with long COVID? If so why don’t I know any? I’m sure some people are affected by it but claims on it seem wildly overblown to me.

Anyway though my whole point is that everyone can do their own thing. I have taken essentially no precautions for the last year or so and unless something major changes will not take any precautions for the rest of my life outside of additional vaccination.

I had Covid back in February and I was double vaxxed and boosted at the time. I was never hospitalized, but I was on the edge a couple of times on going to the emergency room. I was sick for all of Feb and March and still struggled through April and May. I started feeling better and my breathing ( shortness of breath) started getting noticebly better in June. Currently I feel I am at 98% of normal. I am retired at 67 years old, but I am in good health overall, the only Meds I take are Atorvastatin 20 mg to maintain my LDL which is <100 and I get a checkup every 6 months with my Doctor.

I don't know if that would be considered long covid or not... It kicked my ass for 5 months. I sure as hell don't want it again. I got my second booster yesterday of Moderna. Two Shots and Two Boosters.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Fanatical Meat

eelw

Diamond Member
Dec 4, 1999
9,557
4,754
136
I don't know if that would be considered long covid or not...
Neurological symptoms

  • Difficulty thinking or concentrating (sometimes referred to as “brain fog”)

Going to be hard to determine for this case folks. Since we know prior, how dumb his posts are.
 
Feb 4, 2009
34,730
15,993
136
I had Covid back in February and I was double vaxxed and boosted at the time. I was never hospitalized, but I was on the edge a couple of times on going to the emergency room. I was sick for all of Feb and March and still struggled through April and May. I started feeling better and my breathing ( shortness of breath) started getting noticebly better in June. Currently I feel I am at 98% of normal. I am retired at 67 years old, but I am in good health overall, the only Meds I take are Atorvastatin 20 mg to maintain my LDL which is <100 and I get a checkup every 6 months with my Doctor.

I don't know if that would be considered long covid or not... It kicked my ass for 5 months. I sure as hell don't want it again. I got my second booster yesterday of Moderna. Two Shots and Two Boosters.
Good man
 
  • Like
Reactions: pcgeek11

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
85,057
49,861
136
I had Covid back in February and I was double vaxxed and boosted at the time. I was never hospitalized, but I was on the edge a couple of times on going to the emergency room. I was sick for all of Feb and March and still struggled through April and May. I started feeling better and my breathing ( shortness of breath) started getting noticebly better in June. Currently I feel I am at 98% of normal. I am retired at 67 years old, but I am in good health overall, the only Meds I take are Atorvastatin 20 mg to maintain my LDL which is <100 and I get a checkup every 6 months with my Doctor.

I don't know if that would be considered long covid or not... It kicked my ass for 5 months. I sure as hell don't want it again. I got my second booster yesterday of Moderna. Two Shots and Two Boosters.
I would think it would. Like I said I'm sure it exists and I imagine the more severe your illness the more likely you are to have long term effects - I just don't buy the 20% figure.
 
  • Like
Reactions: pcgeek11

MrSquished

Lifer
Jan 14, 2013
22,413
20,484
136
I'm vaxxed and boosted back when the boosters first became available to the general public, I'm holding off for another booster that's variant specific for the newer variants.

I basically go about my day pre-Covid, as fksimospy, except these past 10 days I've been masking up. Leaving for the Mediterranean tomorrow, didn't want to fuck that up.
 

pcgeek11

Lifer
Jun 12, 2005
21,535
4,620
136
Neurological symptoms

  • Difficulty thinking or concentrating (sometimes referred to as “brain fog”)

Going to be hard to determine for this case folks. Since we know prior, how dumb his posts are.

Wow.
You guys just can't help yourselves. I feel sorry that you are so weak minded as to have the need to insult everyone that disagrees with you.
 
Feb 4, 2009
34,730
15,993
136
I'm vaxxed and boosted back when the boosters first became available to the general public, I'm holding off for another booster that's variant specific for the newer variants.

I basically go about my day pre-Covid, as fksimospy, except these past 10 days I've been masking up. Leaving for the Mediterranean tomorrow, didn't want to fuck that up.
Per the local news last night you will be eligible for the variant specific booster no matter what. Timing a booster now does not impact the variant specific versions that should arrive in November.
 
  • Like
Reactions: pcgeek11

brycejones

Lifer
Oct 18, 2005
26,924
25,493
136
Neurological symptoms

  • Difficulty thinking or concentrating (sometimes referred to as “brain fog”)

Going to be hard to determine for this case folks. Since we know prior, how dumb his posts are.
I disagree with geek on just about everything but this doesn’t seem appropriate for his post. He was honest and open with us and that should be encouraged.
 
Last edited:

dullard

Elite Member
May 21, 2001
25,256
3,660
126
I find those long COVID claims to be absurd and when you read the studies ‘long covid’ encompasses things like having body aches and feeling tired, also known as being old. It also doesn’t pass the smell test. Do we really think 50 million or so Americans are struggling with long COVID? If so why don’t I know any? I’m sure some people are affected by it but claims on it seem wildly overblown to me.
When you dig down into poll data, 7.5% (about 1 in 13.3) of adults claim to CURRENTLY have long Covid. That would be 20 million US adults not 50 million. Considering that the average adult has an inner circle of 5 people, there is a large number of us that wouldn't not have anyone with long Covid in our inner circle. Even with ~15 people that most people spend most of their time with, there is a good chance to miss a 1 in 13.3 event. It isn't surprising that your acquaintances have not told you their detailed health history and current struggles, especially given your strong feelings on the subject.

The higher percentages were of people that claim to have had long Covid, which includes both those who currently have it and who claim to have recovered from it. Of course there is a third unknown quantity: those who think they recovered but have an unknown weakened circulatory system.
 
Last edited:

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
85,057
49,861
136
When you dig down into poll data, 7.5% (about 1 in 13.3) of adults claim to CURRENTLY have long Covid. That would be 20 million US adults not 50 million. Considering that the average adult has an inner circle of 5 people, there is a large number of us that wouldn't not have anyone with long Covid in our inner circle. Even with ~15 people that most people spend most of their time with, there is a good chance to miss a 1 in 13.3 event. It isn't surprising that your acquaintances have not told you their detailed health history and current struggles, especially given your strong feelings on the subject.
That’s not good math, you would have to look at the population of people who have EVER claimed to have long COVID to judge if I would have known them. It’s certainly possible that some people I know are struggling with long COVID but I see no indication of it. I’m also hardly alone in this observation.

I don’t have strong feelings on this subject at all. I’m of the opinion that everyone should do whatever they feel most comfortable with. What’a funny is that I am COVID indifferent but for some reason that bothers people who do have strong feelings on the subject. I don’t take any precautions not because I am some sort of no restriction militant, I just don’t care because I looked at the risks and understand they are very small.

The higher percentages were of people that claim to have had long Covid, which includes both those who currently have it and who claim to have recovered from it. Of course there is a third unknown quantity: those who think they recovered but have an unknown weakened circulatory system.
No, if you look at the studies more closely you’ll see the range of symptoms is almost comically large and encompasses lots of things people complain of all the time, even pre-covid.

I remember one particularly telling study that showed the percentage of people with long COVID symptoms who had never had COVID were the same as those who had, which really says something.
 

ondma

Platinum Member
Mar 18, 2018
2,844
1,411
136
Here is the data I was referring to. I suppose one can think they are better at diagnosing long covid than the CDC if they wish, but this is the latest data as per CDC criteria
(
link
 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
85,057
49,861
136
Here is the data I was referring to. I suppose one can think they are better at diagnosing long covid than the CDC if they wish, but this is the latest data as per CDC criteria
(
link
Exactly. Here’s the CDC definition of what conditions qualify as ‘long COVID’.


They are so wide ranging that essentially every American probably qualifies for one of them. Feeling anxiety qualifies you as being a long COVID sufferer, for example.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ondma
Feb 4, 2009
34,730
15,993
136
Listen real long COVID sound miserable. Neighbor of my Sister has it and I’m not sure for how long but I do know it’s been months at minimum. Her last description was the guy who is mid fifties said something to the effect:
Yesterday was a good day, I was able to make breakfast, shower and walk around the back yard twice.
I feel bad for the dude, that dude is literally the only first hand person I know of with long term COVID.
Back to vaccination, I stay *mostly* on top of it simply to avoid hospitalization when I get sick. I have no expectation of avoiding COVID for the rest of my life.
I have a suspicion I had a case at the very beginning, went to a social even and sat next to a guy who travels to Taiwan frequently who was coughing, 48 hours later I was sick and that was easily the most sick/tired/dry/sore I have ever been and it went on for a solid 5-6 days. I wasn’t fully better until 10-14 days after.
 

ondma

Platinum Member
Mar 18, 2018
2,844
1,411
136
Exactly. Here’s the CDC definition of what conditions qualify as ‘long COVID’.


They are so wide ranging that essentially every American probably qualifies for one of them. Feeling anxiety qualifies you as being a long COVID sufferer, for example.
I am sure it is not quite that simple. One would have to compare the degree of anxiety before and after covid and see if there was a change. Admittedly subjective and hard to diagnose, but that does not mean it is not real.

BTW, I am back to normal now, but while I was the sickest with Covid, I had *extremely* vivid and intense dreams, with the same one occurring several times. Very disturbing.
 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
85,057
49,861
136
I am sure it is not quite that simple. One would have to compare the degree of anxiety before and after covid and see if there was a change. Admittedly subjective and hard to diagnose, but that does not mean it is not real.

BTW, I am back to normal now, but while I was the sickest with Covid, I had *extremely* vivid and intense dreams, with the same one occurring several times. Very disturbing.
These estimates are based on self reported survey data so there’s no validation going on.

In addition a lot of those findings are suspicious and indicative of the survey measuring something other than ongoing medical effects from COVID. For example why would being bisexual make you 70% more likely to suffer from long COVID than if you were gay or straight? Why would younger people be at greater risk than older people when in every other aspect the opposite is true?
 

pmv

Lifer
May 30, 2008
13,358
8,273
136
These estimates are based on self reported survey data so there’s no validation going on.

In addition a lot of those findings are suspicious and indicative of the survey measuring something other than ongoing medical effects from COVID. For example why would being bisexual make you 70% more likely to suffer from long COVID than if you were gay or straight? Why would younger people be at greater risk than older people when in every other aspect the opposite is true?


Hmm, I wonder if your reaction is a sign that "long COVID" sufferers are going to face the same skepticism and "we all feel tired sometimes" responses that chronic fatigue syndrome people have long endured?

Fair point about the bisexuality thing, but I don't think that final point is very compelling. Could easily be quite different factors involved in "long covid" vs the mortality-rate from COVID itself, and immune system responses vary between younger and older people.
 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
85,057
49,861
136
Hmm, I wonder if your reaction is a sign that "long COVID" sufferers are going to face the same skepticism and "we all feel tired sometimes" responses that chronic fatigue syndrome people have long endured?
If anything I think people are excessively credulous of its prevalence. The media plays towards sensationalism and studies that show up to 40-50%(!) of people are afflicted by long COVID probably get a lot of clicks so they keep running them.

I also think over time we will develop a better clinical definition of what long COVID is that will be more stringent than ‘do you feel anxious’.

Fair point about the bisexuality thing, but I don't think that final point is very compelling. Could easily be quite different factors involved in "long covid" vs the mortality-rate from COVID itself, and immune system responses vary between younger and older people.
Sure it is definitely possible but findings like that are cause for skepticism, especially when combined with almost certainly erroneous findings like the bi/gay divide. It is a sign that the survey is probably measuring something other than just medical COVID issues. My guess would be that the pandemic generally has made people more depressed and anxious as well as more aware of their bodies and potential symptoms.

Again, I completely accept that some people have long term, debilitating effects from COVID. I am just very suspicious about numbers this high that rely on implausible survey results and directly contradict my lived experience and to the best of my knowledge the lived experience of almost everyone I know. (And in NYC I can’t think of a person I know who hasn’t gotten COVID.) Maybe I'll turn out to be all wrong about this but I think it's absolutely correct to view these numbers with a large grain of salt.
 

dullard

Elite Member
May 21, 2001
25,256
3,660
126
I don’t have strong feelings on this subject at all.
I think you might need to work on your self-analysis skills. You can't even acknowledge your fully misleading statement above that I quoted multiple times. In no world is there only two options of "never participate in these activities ever again" and "living life". The fact that you keep skipping over any discussion on it shows that you have strong feelings. Heck, the fact that you put it into only two stark polarized choices with no grey in between proves that you have strong feelings on it.
 
Last edited: