Got a couple wisdom teeth extracted

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Torn Mind

Lifer
Nov 25, 2012
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Per WebMD:

Products made from cream — like ice cream, cream cheese, custard, or butter — should be avoided due to the high levels of lactose. In addition to some kinds of cheeses, some people with lactose intolerance may be able to eat yogurt in moderation, as the lactose has been partly broken down.


The reason you should avoid yogurt with some antibiotics is that live cultures and the resulting high acid can interfere with their mechanism of function. It has zero to do with lactose.
I only have issues when I'm on antibiotics, and only with regular yogurt and milk so far.

I've already eaten 10oz of cream cheese today and 6 oz yesterday. No digestion discomfort and loose bowels yet despite 32g of lactose in my system. .
Looks like the freaking loogie I hacked up the other day! :oops:

Bon Appétit ! :p
Salt, pepper, soy sauce, and water added to a regular omelette mix and then steamed creates that tasty concoction. It's egg-based soft tofu or jello. :p
I'm not serving it to outsiders, so it doesn't need to be dressed to the 10s, loaded with makeup, and tacked on with breast implants. ;)

Here's a more photogenic representation of the exact same thing

1638564678138.png
 
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Nov 17, 2019
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For about the first three hours after they yanked mine a few weeks ago, I had one of those gauze pads in placed and clenched down. The third one I took out was just as red as the first. I decided not to put another one in which kept me from clenching so much. I didn't notice much red after that. Almost like the gauze and clenching was keeping it from clotting.

I took pills for the first 24 hours or so, mostly to help me sleep in case some gnarly throbbing started. Of three days supply, I probably have a day and a half left. Same with the bottles from a few years back, which probably are inert by now.
 
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Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
30,213
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I only have issues when I'm on antibiotics, and only with regular yogurt and milk so far.

I've already eaten 10oz of cream cheese today and 6 oz yesterday. No digestion discomfort and loose bowels yet despite 32g of lactose in my system. .
Salt, pepper, soy sauce, and water added to a regular omelette mix and then steamed creates that tasty concoction. It's egg-based soft tofu or jello. :p
I'm not serving it to outsiders, so it doesn't need to be dressed to the 10s, loaded with makeup, and tacked on with breast implants. ;)

Here's a more photogenic representation of the exact same thing

View attachment 53775


Creme Brulee with scallions? ;)

Seriously though that SOUNDS pretty good! :)

Also I don't think you really are lactose intolerant if you can tolerate eating cream cheese .... at least no more then every human is.
 

Torn Mind

Lifer
Nov 25, 2012
11,512
2,613
136
Creme Brulee with scallions? ;)

Seriously though that SOUNDS pretty good! :)

Also I don't think you really are lactose intolerant if you can tolerate eating cream cheese .... at least no more then every human is.
The intolerance is relatively minor and only noticeable when I'm on amoxcillin or another antibiotic. Then eating milk or yogurt makes my bowels become loose. I respond fine to cheese, but that's probably because the bacteria has fermented the lactose already. Cream cheese has 2g of carbs per serving and I don't know how much is lactose vs other saccharides.


You have now learned a secret Asian technique to cooking eggs. :D
 
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pcgeek11

Lifer
Jun 12, 2005
21,204
4,354
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I can't remember hearing about deep cleanings until a month ago. That was the day I met my new dentist. My former dentist of ~40 years retired a few weeks before anybody on earth knew about Covid-19, lucky for him I guess. I sensed that we were in for it and didn't go indoors with anybody until I was vaxxed. Did check out a local Nextdoor thread from someone soliciting ideas for a dentist locally, and made a note to call the the DDS who got the raves, the hands-down winner. Finally, after 2 Modernas and the booster I was ready.

His operation is damn impressive. All woman staff, just like my former dentist, but more sophisticated, seemingly 3-4 times the staff. He scheduled me for 2 deep cleanings (2 hours each), but not with a periodontist, evidently with his own staff who specialize in deep cleanings. He fixed a cavity 3 weeks later but didn't do the filling, he turned that over to his "filling specialist." First time I'd ever heard of that, all my fillings before were done by the dentist.

I suppose I should ask about the laser surgery and periodontist. He did send me to a very well regarded local endodontist (who did my one and only root canal 12 years ago) to evaluate and treat my tooth resorption issue on tooth #11. That guy really knows what he's doing, I'm seeing him today to remove the stitches.

Never had a deep cleaning before. What's that like?

A good regular deep cleaning is done manually under a Anesthesia. They scrape out very deep in the gum pockets to get all the infection out. They then seal up the area with a wax type substance for a week. Usually if the pockets are real deep ( like 5 - 6 mm ) they will remove some of the gum tissue which will allow you to clean the area properly with floss. you can't clean that deep with floss or anything else.

Laser surgery is much better as the scrap out all the junk in the pockets then they kill any bacteria with a laser. they also use the laser to burn off any surface tissue which promotes new growth tight to the tooth. A little sore for a few days and all is well after.

A dentist may give you a good cleaning in the pockets, but they cannot compare with a good periodontist. I had gum problems my entire life until I had Laser surgery with a periodontist. No issues in Years! I still alternate routine cleanings between the Dentist and Periodontist.
 
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Torn Mind

Lifer
Nov 25, 2012
11,512
2,613
136
I can't remember hearing about deep cleanings until a month ago. That was the day I met my new dentist. My former dentist of ~40 years retired a few weeks before anybody on earth knew about Covid-19, lucky for him I guess. I sensed that we were in for it and didn't go indoors with anybody until I was vaxxed. Did check out a local Nextdoor thread from someone soliciting ideas for a dentist locally, and made a note to call the the DDS who got the raves, the hands-down winner. Finally, after 2 Modernas and the booster I was ready.

His operation is damn impressive. All woman staff, just like my former dentist, but more sophisticated, seemingly 3-4 times the staff. He scheduled me for 2 deep cleanings (2 hours each), but not with a periodontist, evidently with his own staff who specialize in deep cleanings. He fixed a cavity 3 weeks later but didn't do the filling, he turned that over to his "filling specialist." First time I'd ever heard of that, all my fillings before were done by the dentist.

I suppose I should ask about the laser surgery and periodontist. He did send me to a very well regarded local endodontist (who did my one and only root canal 12 years ago) to evaluate and treat my tooth resorption issue on tooth #11. That guy really knows what he's doing, I'm seeing him today to remove the stitches.

Never had a deep cleaning before. What's that like?
Are you sure you need a deep cleaning? If you don't have perio pockets, you don't need a deep cleaning. If your readings are 3mm or less, you don't have perio.
 
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BoomerD

No Lifer
Feb 26, 2006
62,486
10,825
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I was on the mouth guard for a while, could not stand the thing, at one point it also started to make it worse. Gave up on it and that's when I ended up going for sleep study.

I heard botox can help cure the clenching, but it only lasts like 6 months, so I don't know if I want to do that as it could have long term effects like weakening bones. I may try it once though, because if I can stop the clenching temporarily it may give a chance for TMJ to heal, and maybe after that point it will stop.

Though best direction is to probably look at the wisdom teeth route. They might be aggravating something in my sleep that I don't realize.

My dentist gave me a mouth guard for clenching my teeth...I broke the fucking thing clenching/grinding my teeth. He offered to make me a new one..."I've never seen anyone do that before!" I declined.
 

Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
67,013
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www.anyf.ca
My dentist gave me a mouth guard for clenching my teeth...I broke the fucking thing clenching/grinding my teeth. He offered to make me a new one..."I've never seen anyone do that before!" I declined.

Thankfully mine is not THAT bad, but I heard it can get that bad for some people. Those are freaking expensive too, like $400ish is what I paid for mine if I remember. Used it for a couple months then just could not stand it anymore. I dreaded even going to bed.

I am now stuck on cpap so starting to feel the same way about that... I just want to be able to go to sleep normally without any weird contraptions.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
37,258
7,978
136
Are you sure you need a deep cleaning? If you don't have perio pockets, you don't need a deep cleaning. If your readings are 3mm or less, you don't have perio.
I think I have some up to 6mm. Well, I just had an issue addressed by an endodontist (sent there by my new highly recommended dentist, but I'd seen this endodontist before, sent by my former dentist for my then one and only root canal in 2009, now 2, had the 2nd done a month ago), being a tooth resorption detected in 2016. I saw a different guy for treatment of that in 2016 (a filling), but the resorption resumed, as shown in x-rays over a month ago. Also there was a deep pocket of around 6mm on that tooth I had to try to keep clean with picks these last 5 years. The endodontist is much better at dealing with this than the guy I saw in 2016. He uses a microscope in his practice, has done quite a few of these and has considerable confidence that his actions will lead to a permanent fix (he's had 5 years of follow ups to bolster his confidence), even though resorptions are notoriously unpredictable. First he did a root canal on the tooth, then oral surgery (now 5 days ago). Had the stitches out 2 days ago, I'll have a follow up appointment in a year to check to see I'm OK.
 

pcgeek11

Lifer
Jun 12, 2005
21,204
4,354
136
I think I have some up to 6mm. Well, I just had an issue addressed by an endodontist (sent there by my new highly recommended dentist, but I'd seen this endodontist before, sent by my former dentist for my then one and only root canal in 2009, now 2, had the 2nd done a month ago), being a tooth resorption detected in 2016. I saw a different guy for treatment of that in 2016 (a filling), but the resorption resumed, as shown in x-rays over a month ago. Also there was a deep pocket of around 6mm on that tooth I had to try to keep clean with picks these last 5 years. The endodontist is much better at dealing with this than the guy I saw in 2016. He uses a microscope in his practice, has done quite a few of these and has considerable confidence that his actions will lead to a permanent fix (he's had 5 years of follow ups to bolster his confidence), even though resorptions are notoriously unpredictable. First he did a root canal on the tooth, then oral surgery (now 5 days ago). Had the stitches out 2 days ago, I'll have a follow up appointment in a year to check to see I'm OK.


If you have 6 mm pockets in your gums you need to see a periodontist asap. It is going to get food impacted and then infection and then major bone loss. Next is bye bye tooth. The longer you wait the worse it is going to get. It is impossible for you to clean in a 6 mm pocket.

A guide:


Size and severity of periodontal pockets
  • 1 to 3 mm: normal
  • 4 to 5 mm: early or mild periodontitis; gum disease is present
  • 5 to 7 mm: moderate periodontitis
  • 7 to 12 mm: advanced periodontitis
 
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Torn Mind

Lifer
Nov 25, 2012
11,512
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I managed to squeeze in eating a ground beef patty today(some Rastelli grass-fed I managed to buy on clearance at Safeway). Broke it down into small, ready-to-swallow pieces, but not too small.
 

Torn Mind

Lifer
Nov 25, 2012
11,512
2,613
136
I think I have some up to 6mm. Well, I just had an issue addressed by an endodontist (sent there by my new highly recommended dentist, but I'd seen this endodontist before, sent by my former dentist for my then one and only root canal in 2009, now 2, had the 2nd done a month ago), being a tooth resorption detected in 2016. I saw a different guy for treatment of that in 2016 (a filling), but the resorption resumed, as shown in x-rays over a month ago. Also there was a deep pocket of around 6mm on that tooth I had to try to keep clean with picks these last 5 years. The endodontist is much better at dealing with this than the guy I saw in 2016. He uses a microscope in his practice, has done quite a few of these and has considerable confidence that his actions will lead to a permanent fix (he's had 5 years of follow ups to bolster his confidence), even though resorptions are notoriously unpredictable. First he did a root canal on the tooth, then oral surgery (now 5 days ago). Had the stitches out 2 days ago, I'll have a follow up appointment in a year to check to see I'm OK.
Diet may play a role. You need foods containing vitamins and other compounds that limit osteoclast function and promote osteoblast formation. D3, K2. Onions also have compounds that inhibit osteoclasts.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
37,258
7,978
136
If you have 6 mm pockets in your gums you need to see a periodontist asap. It is going to get food impacted and then infection and then major bone loss. Next is bye bye tooth. The longer you wait the worse it is going to get. It is impossible for you to clean in a 6 mm pocket.

A guide:


Size and severity of periodontal pockets
  • 1 to 3 mm: normal
  • 4 to 5 mm: early or mild periodontitis; gum disease is present
  • 5 to 7 mm: moderate periodontitis
  • 7 to 12 mm: advanced periodontitis
My new dentist is beyond the ordinary dentist and I think his staff very likely is as well. I'll grill him on the issues when I see him. My last dentist didn't have the ability to deal with it and didn't refer me. He retired 2 years ago. He was a really good dentist but didn't have the facilities and resources of my new dentist.
 
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Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
37,258
7,978
136
Diet may play a role. You need foods containing vitamins and other compounds that limit osteoclast function and promote osteoblast formation. D3, K2. Onions also have compounds that inhibit osteoclasts.
What is K2? I do eat a lot of onions, which I think of as God's gift to cooks -- hyerbole of course, but gets the point across that I think of onions as a chef's secret weapon. Onions is something I ALWAYS have plenty of. Plus I grow them in the yard, just in case. Yellow and red. I have a first cousin who growing up was a super onion lover, she'd eat them raw (I asked her recently and she told me she's still nuts about onions). I don't go that far, although if I will at times put raw onions in a sandwich.
 

Torn Mind

Lifer
Nov 25, 2012
11,512
2,613
136
What is K2? I do eat a lot of onions, which I think of as God's gift to cooks -- hyerbole of course, but gets the point across that I think of onions as a chef's secret weapon. Onions is something I ALWAYS have plenty of. Plus I grow them in the yard, just in case. Yellow and red. I have a first cousin who growing up was a super onion lover, she'd eat them raw (I asked her recently and she told me she's still nuts about onions). I don't go that far, although if I will at times put raw onions in a sandwich.
This article summarizes vitamin K2.

It activates matrix GLA protein and osteocalcin, among other things.

 

Torn Mind

Lifer
Nov 25, 2012
11,512
2,613
136
I ate a can of peas(did not drink the juice due to particles) and sour cream for a change of pace from the constant eggs and cream cheese(still ate the cream cheese today though). One tiny pear slice and avocado.

Bleeding has completely stopped and the tissue while still tasting salty and inflamed, is allowing for a greater range of motion.

Practically no pain from the first day onwards , but I did take ibuprofen overnight for Saturday(with acetaminophen) and Sunday(without acetamenophen) just to give a little anti-inflammatory effect for the jaw inflammation. Not sure how much was there.

I'm glad only two came out or else eating would be really a chore and the cleaning would be such a pain in the ass.

I feel for those who down pudding, applesauce, and other super sweet stuff during their recovery. They likely helped fuel the pain and inflammation because the bacteria loves those things and it's not easy to brush and rinse out the sugar with healing tissue in the mouth.

I might consider buying a bottle of clam juice.

Also, I am eating Vit C supplements since many fruits are outright no-no due to seeds or so mushy and sweet(aka a mess in the mouth) I don't feel like eating much.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
37,258
7,978
136
I ate a can of peas(did not drink the juice due to particles) and sour cream for a change of pace from the constant eggs and cream cheese(still ate the cream cheese today though). One tiny pear slice and avocado.

Bleeding has completely stopped and the tissue while still tasting salty and inflamed, is allowing for a greater range of motion.

Practically no pain from the first day onwards , but I did take ibuprofen overnight for Saturday(with acetaminophen) and Sunday(without acetamenophen) just to give a little anti-inflammatory effect for the jaw inflammation. Not sure how much was there.

I'm glad only two came out or else eating would be really a chore and the cleaning would be such a pain in the ass.

I feel for those who down pudding, applesauce, and other super sweet stuff during their recovery. They likely helped fuel the pain and inflammation because the bacteria loves those things and it's not easy to brush and rinse out the sugar with healing tissue in the mouth.

I might consider buying a bottle of clam juice.

Also, I am eating Vit C supplements since many fruits are outright no-no due to seeds or so mushy and sweet(aka a mess in the mouth) I don't feel like eating much.
While recovering from my oral surgery last week I tried to stay away from sugar, I know that bacteria loves sugar. My doctor gave me a solution and Q-tips to swab on the area of the stitches after eating. He also suggested Listerine, which I used quite a few times. I've had some on hand for years but hadn't opened the bottles before last week. They did make me rinse with some in the office before they touched anything in my mouth the last month.
 

Torn Mind

Lifer
Nov 25, 2012
11,512
2,613
136
While recovering from my oral surgery last week I tried to stay away from sugar, I know that bacteria loves sugar. My doctor gave me a solution and Q-tips to swab on the area of the stitches after eating. He also suggested Listerine, which I used quite a few times. I've had some on hand for years but hadn't opened the bottles before last week. They did make me rinse with some in the office before they touched anything in my mouth the last month.
That is rather interesting advice. Many other practices state one should avoid Listerine after surgery. Even the NIH advice told me to start using chlorhexidine on day 2, not day 1. (My head being a little bit fatigued bad sleep, took a little swill of chlorhexidine on day 1 anyway)
Warm salt water every 2 hours or after a meal(never followed that yet). 2 15 ml chlorhexidine rinses per day(I've only done it once a day).

https://www.google.com/search?q=lis...4AIABYYgB7QSSAQE4mAEAoAEBwAEB&sclient=gws-wiz
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
37,258
7,978
136
He didn't tell me to rise with Chlorhexidine, but to dab it on the affected gum area after eating (there were 3 stitches), then spit it out.

I quote a portion of the handout:

Healing will progress better if the area is kept clean after eating. It is important to keep your mouth clean, so brush and floss those teeth where surgery was not performed. For the first 24 hrs, avoid brushing the teeth in the area of the surgical site. Avoid vigorous rinsing or swishing. After the first 24 hrs, cleanse the surgical site by GENTLY rinsing with warm salt water (1/4 teaspoon of salt dissolved in one cup of warm water) or with an anti-bacterial mouthwash (e.g. Listerine).

I did the Listerine rinses, not the salt water.
 

Torn Mind

Lifer
Nov 25, 2012
11,512
2,613
136
Steady progress each day and no complications. Now I can open my mouth easily enough to see in the mirror to irrigate the hole. Can't eat seeds or gritty foods but I'm back to eat numerous "manageable" solid foods. I managed to eat navel orange slices.

Also, it's amazing how peanut butter can be addictively good when there isn't shitty vegetable oil fucking it up like in the usual brands of Skippy, JIF, etc.
 

Medicine Head

Banned
Dec 10, 2021
50
20
36
Two on the right yanked out this session.

Used only local anesthetic. They offered sedation but were hesitant without a physical. I never was able to get an actual physical. Ultimately, I thought it better to not get knocked under with fentanyl since I don't want the risk of becoming a junkie, so that point was moot.

If I wanted to continue, I could have proceeded with four, but I had calls to make in the afternoon.

Found out my bottom wisdom tooth had a third root.

I had already figured my current dentist was not that good. Supervising dentist of the extraction told me I should get a deep cleaning in the future. Current dentist has never mentioned it nor do I think even offers it.

And the procedure was done for free at the NIH; who knows what research they actually want to do with these teeth.
Frozen pics plese of teeth. Didn't get to see my own extracted wisdom teeth. The doctor threw them away before I could ask that I wanted to see them.