Fans spin for a second but comp won't turn on (Solved)

the unknown

Senior member
Dec 22, 2007
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Fairly sure it's a dead mobo but would like confirmation.

i7-4790k, Asrock Z97 Pro 4, EVGA Supernova 850W GS

So, I've gone through the steps, breadboarded the computer, and determined the all components are working except the mobo or the PSU. The PSU turns on and runs a fan but I've heard that doesn't 100% mean it isn't faulty. Here's the tricky part. Sometimes, the computer will turn on like once in 10-30 tries. And it's usually after flipping the PSU power switch to off and waiting ~5 minutes and then turning it back off. Also twice it has turned itself on right after flipping the PSU power switch back on (indicating a short). I can only imagine the mobo is causing this.

I have 1-day shipped a Z97 MSI PC Mate so I will report back to see if that was the cause. Thanks for the help.

IT WAS THE PSU!
 
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the unknown

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Dec 22, 2007
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Thanks for the replies. Well if it is the PSU it's got quite the warranty from EVGA so I know it is covered at least. I already sent a request to Asrock but I was not looking forward to dealing with them. I suppose I'll start the RMA process with EVGA to get the ball rolling there too.
 

NeoPTLD

Platinum Member
Nov 23, 2001
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Thanks for the replies. Well if it is the PSU it's got quite the warranty from EVGA so I know it is covered at least. I already sent a request to Asrock but I was not looking forward to dealing with them. I suppose I'll start the RMA process with EVGA to get the ball rolling there too.

This is one of the reasons why pre-assembled PCs like HP and Dell are superior to home-built.
Get some kind of used PSU for $10 on Craigslist or ask a shop that sells used PCs. Get harnesses to connect to video card if needed. Wattage doesn't really matter unless you get something under 300W as you're going to be adequately covered for just testing and booting up the PC and keep using under light load. If you're really nervous, go to advanced power options in Windows and force maximum CPU speed down to 50% or so. You will have a computer to use while PSU is getting RMA processed and avoid unnecessary RMA. It might be your PSU or motherboard PSU(specifically the CPU or memory voltage regulator), but unlikely to be both.

Video cards use well under 50W doing normal web browsing unless you have an older inefficient one.


Here's the tricky part. Sometimes, the computer will turn on like once in 10-30 tries. And it's usually after flipping the PSU power switch to off and waiting ~5 minutes and then turning it back off.

For future reference, this is a good way to have a data loss or damage something that isn't already faulty.
 
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master_shake_

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May 22, 2012
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This is one of the reasons why pre-assembled PCs like HP and Dell are superior to home-built.
Get some kind of used PSU for $10 on Craigslist or ask a shop that sells used PCs. Get harnesses to connect to video card if needed. Wattage doesn't really matter unless you get something under 300W as you're going to be adequately covered for just testing and booting up the PC and keep using under light load. If you're really nervous, go to advanced power options in Windows and force maximum CPU speed down to 50% or so. You will have a computer to use while PSU is getting RMA processed and avoid unnecessary RMA. It might be your PSU or motherboard PSU(specifically the CPU or memory voltage regulator), but unlikely to be both.

Video cards use well under 50W doing normal web browsing unless you have an older inefficient one.




For future reference, this is a good way to have a data loss or damage something that isn't already faulty.

really?

wow. bad components are a part of everyday life. i've owned some of those dell and hp's you speak of when it comes to support you are better off hitting your head against a wall.

oh this computer won't support bsd? why not? oh dell.... i see.
 

the unknown

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Dec 22, 2007
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This is one of the reasons why pre-assembled PCs like HP and Dell are superior to home-built.

Well to be fair in 10 years of home built PC's this is the first mobo or PSU to go bad on me. And I contacted Asrock and was pleasantly surprised when they contacted me within 4 hours AND approved my RMA request. Plus I save several hundred dollars buying each component on sale, get components with features I get to pick out, ect. Seems like a no brainer to be if you know what you're doing.

For future reference, this is a good way to have a data loss or damage something that isn't already faulty.

Noted. Thanks, I won't be messing around with it anymore.


As a side note, I forgot to give the shipper the gate keycode so I will be trying the new mobo later tonight.
 

NeoPTLD

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Nov 23, 2001
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really?
wow. bad components are a part of everyday life. i've owned some of those dell and hp's you speak of when it comes to support you are better off hitting your head against a wall.

oh this computer won't support bsd? why not? oh dell.... i see.

I agree if you mean their consumer product side of things. Having to speak to a call center is something most people dread. I have not had experience dealing with their consumer product side of things but what I hear is like dealing with cable or cell phone company.

People who bought from Dell through small business channel usually have better experience. Consumer product support performance is often measured in minutes per call and often outsourced to a contractor directed to follow scripts to speak with people who don't speak our language. They assume the average consumer has to be told "ok sir. please hold the windows button and press R at the same time. ok. please enter r. e. g. e. d. i. t. ok? please hit enter key".

You should be comparing higher end systems against support offered on Optiplex and Precision line rather than the Inspiron line. You won't be required to ship the entire thing for warranty service as you would with many consumer line products and I would personally never ship a computer for service with the disk drive in it.

Other than having to deal with multiple manufacturers, damage from failed parts are often excluded from coverage. I have seen a handful of threads about a leaking water cooler damaging other components. The typical responses have been we'll replace the water cooler, but we can't do anything else. If the liquid cooler in Precision T7910 spews its guts and fries pretty much everything, you don't have that non-sense to deal with. Years ago, I personally had a power supply fail and take out a motherboard with it. Neither was in warranty but getting the motherboard paid for would have been a tough one.
 

the unknown

Senior member
Dec 22, 2007
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Solved...

Looks like it was a bad motherboard after all. I put it the new motherboard and it starts up and runs everything as it should be. I did some a small 5 minute prime95 test to stress it a bit and everything seems normal. Asrock will be RMA'ing the board and I'll have everything back to normal in a week. Thanks for the help!
 
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the unknown

Senior member
Dec 22, 2007
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So, the the computer actually stopped working after day 3. I really was sure it was the mobo as the computer would boot normally with the new one but nope. Just wouldn't turn on again after a few days. So of course I RMA'd the PSU and lo and behold that was the problem. Looks like you were all right after all.

Thought I'd just add this post for posterity's sake.
 

DAPUNISHER

Super Moderator CPU Forum Mod and Elite Member
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Thanks for posting the solution, it helps searchers.

And I will add some free advice for readers. Good PSUs for testing purposes can be had for $30 or so all the time. Grab one and keep it for troubleshooting. The time and frustration it can save is more than worth the small expenditure.