Digital Audio Thread

YOyoYOhowsDAjello

Moderator<br>A/V & Home Theater<br>Elite member
Aug 6, 2001
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1. Intro
2. Disadvantages of digital
3. Advantages of digital
4. Soundcards
5. Digital Speaker Systems
6. Help, it's only playing on 2 speakers
7. Cables / Connections
8. Bit-Perfect Info


1. Intro

Ok, so someone has linked you to this thread to give you some info on digital audio. Just some stuff I wanted to cover before I get into specifics...
Speakers are analog. Sound information starts off in your computer as digital and at some point needs to be converted to analog before it comes out your speakers. Even "digital speakers" are analog.
DD (Dolby Digital) and DTS (from Digital Theater Systems) are both multichannel digital sound sound formats that allow multichannel audio to be compressed into a digital stream.

So as I stated above, what comes out our speakers / headphones is analog in the end, so most of the digital issues and "features" that come up are mostly related to just when this conversion happens. When people get really serious about audio, they will more often than not try to keep it analog all the way from start to finish by starting from an analog source like records (anyone remember those? ;) ) and keeping it analog all the way along their chain of components before it ends up coming out their speakers.

In the world of computers, we're all starting with digital as our source, so the options we have are mostly limited to when and how the conversion to analog is going to happen.


2. Disadvantages to Digital

Ok, so basically there are two kinds of a digital signal that a soundcard can put out. One would be PCM, which is just stereo, and the other is a compressed multichannel stream (DD or DTS).

If you want to use digital, most cards out there with a digital output will only be able to give you PCM output and pass along a previously encoded DD/DTS stream. That means that you would get the desired output from stereo sources (like music) with PCM and you'd get the desired output from pre-encoded sources (like DVD movies) with DD/DTS passthrough.

The major limitation here is when it comes to games. In the case of games, individual sound track information is not available for each channel since the sound is dynamic. Since it's not all pre-recorded, in order to output a DD/DTS stream with the proper 5.1 info, your soundcard would have to encode the surround info into a DD/DTS stream in real time.

There are cards out there than can do this now, and it is becoming more widespread. A major note here is that Creative's cards do not support DD/DTS encoding. With creative's monopoly on EAX higher than 2.0, if you do get a card that encodes multichannel digital streams, you will not get all the EAX effects that the latest Creative cards are capable of.

Ok, now that I've covered that...

Even if you do get a card that outputs digital as you desire, that's probably not going to be any better quality than a decent analog card could output... and will actually probably get you lower quality results. As you know, sound has to end up analog... so by outputting digital, all you are doing is postponing when this conversion happens. In the majority of cases I have read, people want to hook up digitally to a set of computer speakers (like Logitech z-5500s, etc.). The issue is that the control pod on the speakers is now doing the work that the soundcard would have done initially if it had been outputting analog. If you get a decent soundcard, it will probably do as good or a better job at this than the control pods on these speaker sets will do.

Also, by its very nature, DD/DTS streams are compressed audio. You're potentially giving up some quality be using these sound formats. Also, there may be slight delay in this encoding process so may experience some delay in your final sound.

3. Advantages to Digital

If you have some high quality sound components in your system, they may do a better job with a digital signal and processing it vs. what your soundcard could do in it's analog output.

If you have some high quality sound components that process digital signals and apply some calibration / equalization effects to those inputs, this may be a preferred way to connect as 5.1 analog connections tend to not have any processing done on them.

Connecting one digital cable can be more convenient than several analog cables.

If you are experiencing some ground loop problems between your computer and sound system, a digital optical connection would eliminate that issue.

If you want to connect to a receiver that lacks 5.1 analog input, digital is your only option for getting surround sound.

There is the potential for less signal interference in the transmission of a digital signal to your sound system than if you were transmitting analog.

4. Soundcards

Ok, now that I've kind of gone over some basics... what's good?

If you just want to output stereo PCM and have passthrough of DD, the Chaintech AV-710 is a great budget card. In addition to the ability to get bit-perfect digital output, the Chaintech card also has one good quality analog output on it. This would be a good card to get if you want to connect a set of 2.0/2.1 speakers for music listening or if you want those basic digital sound output options.

If you think that you want a card that encodes digital streams, you have some options. Once upon a time your only option was soundstorm audio integrated into some older motherboards, but rather recently a couple companies have started producing DDL / DTS live cards. The Turtlebeach Montego and Bluegears / HDA X-Mystique were some of the first cards out with that feature.

More recently some integrated audio solutions have started to have this feature and Auzentech has stated to come out with new products that include this feature. The X-Plosion was introduced after the X-Mystique and has added the ability to enocde DTS in real time in addition to DD. The DDL connection is compressed to 640Kbps, so DTS at 1.5Mbps should produce a better final result than the DD output. Their X-Meridian is their newest card that is in the works and concentrates more on analog output quality.

For the majority of comptuer users who use analog speakers and want good gaming performance, Creative is pretty much your main option. With deals on X-Fi in the ~$70 range, that's a solid choice on a card for most users. Especially for someone that wants to game on headphones, the X-Fi has a lot to offer. The reason to get X-Fi is for it's high quality analog audio output, it's surround headphone feature, and it's multichannel gaming abilities. By connecting to it digitally, you're really not taking advantage of most of what makes the X-Fi a good card. On a tighter budget, the older Audigy 2 cards also offer good bang for your buck for a gaming card.

One issue many people have with the digital connectivity on Creative sound cards is the upsampling algorithm it employs. The card at times takes audio and upsamples it to 48KHz and outputs that out the digital connection. Most music is 44.1KHz and upsampling is a process often looked down upon in the audio world. After years of not having an option to disable upsampling on their Audigy series of cards, X-Fi cards can be set to output bit-perfect at 44.1kHz without upsampling. This is possible in Audio Creation Mode.

There are plenty of other cards out there, most notably ones that have good analog outputs for music quality and more professional cards that have a lot mor connectivity options for inputs/outputs.
That's kind of beyond what this thread is about so go nuts on the research in your own ;)

Just as a rule of thumb, a good starting point balancing your audio budget might be to spend twice as much (or more ) on speakers as your soundcard. If you're thinking headphones, you can get better quality for cheaper, so as long as you have a pretty good pair, X-Fi may be a good way to go if you're a gamer.


Cheesehead adds:
"IMHO, a good USB DAC (PCM2706 for USB-> I2S, and TDA1543s or the like for the DAC) is the best way to go. Cheap, too-TDA1543 DAC kits can be had for a whopping 40$ on eBay, and a USB->I2S adapter can be made for 10$.

As an added bonus, an outboard PSU is easy. Just run the TDA1543 and output stage off of a wall-wart with some big power filtering caps on it."


5. Digital Speaker Systems

Ok, so if you have a digital speaker system, is it better to use a digital connection?

As I've gone over above, in most cases probably not if you can just get a card with good analog output instead. A case where it might be a good idea is if you have integrated audio with pretty bad analog output but decent digital output. Another case might be where you do not care about gaming at all and just want to give your speakers PCM stereo or pass digital streams to offload the burden of decoding to your speakers. I fall into this category myself as I really don't game much and the vast majority of my usage is just passing PCM to my Boston Acoustics AVP7 Preamp.

For someone with a computer speakers system, I would say that if you have a 5.1 analog input on the set, use it. You wont have to deal with the digital surround sound issue and if you get a decent card for analog output, it will probably do a better job than the control pod on your speakers would do with processing the signal.

Creative has also released their own external encoder, the DTS-610. Use of this box will allow for full EAX effects and still takes advantage of the analog processing of the X-fi. However, it does have its downsides too. The box will introduce some lag between video and audio due to the extra processing the audio will require to encode to the digital connection. Also, you will still be compressing the audio when encoding unlike if you had a straight digital connection. It should also be noted that some loss in quality can be expected due to conversion. The X-fi uses its D/A converters to send the signal analog out to the box then the box converts it to digital and then the speaker system uses its D/A converters to change it back to analog. In the end, this will result in no where near the quality you would get from a straight analog connection from the X-fi. Lastly, the box is rather expensive. When coupled with the price of an X-fi, you are talking about a serious investment.

There are some cases where connecting via digital is pretty much your only option. On some speaker systems, decoding a DD / DTS stream is your only option to get output from all the speakers. For example, Klipsch's GMX-D 5.1 set or if you're connecting to a home theater and your receiver does not have a 5.1 analog input. In these cases you're pretty much forced to get something that can encode DD / DTS if you want to game and use surround sound. Note that often you can kind of get "fake surround" going if you give a set like this a stereo signal (either with PCM digital or stereo analog). You might apply Dolby Prologic II or DTS Neo:6. These options would have your system take that stereo signal and then kind of fake 5.1 output out of it. You'll get output from all your speakers and it will often do a good job centering voices to the center channel and so forth... but it's not going to get you the true surround sound experience you'll want for gaming.

6. Help, it's only playing on 2 speakers

Ok, this one isn't really related to digital necessarily, but it comes up often enough.

4/5 times, the solution to this "problem" seems to be that people do not use a multichannel source when they are trying to test their surround sound system. If you use standard music to test out your system, unless you have some funky "fake surround" option enabled, you should just get output from your front two speakers and the subwoofer.

Music is a stereo source (unless you're talking DVD-A etc.) so it should only play out of your two fronts and the sub. Some people want to have music play out all their speakers, and if you want to that's fine too. If you have never tried listening to just 2.1 on your surround sound system, I would suggest you try it. By listening in stereo, you preserve the soundstage of the original recording and you get playback as it was meant to be experienced.

"Fake surround" options like Creative's CMSS or Dolby Prologic II can give you surround sound out of stereo sources like music, but they can do more harm than good.

Ok... what if you're using a surround source to test your speakers and you still only get 2.1 output? Well... then we're probably going to need more info to try to figure it out ;)

7. Cables / Connections

Ok, so you've got your digital and your analog signals.

Digital signals are carried by either a digital optical (toslink) cable of a digital coaxial cable.

For practical purposes, the signal and sound quality should be basically the same with either one you use.

For digital optical, there is the added benefit that it's basically eliminating ground loop / EM interference along the cable. The downside is there used to be some issues with jitter with some early designs, but everything appears to be worked out now.

For digital coaxial, one benefit is you might even already have a cable you can use. It's just a 75ohm RCA cable, so a yellow video RCA cable should be exactly the type of cable you want. Advantages to digital coaxial would be that it's often a more robust connection and cable than your typical toslink cable.

For analog audio, normally cables are built in to computer speakers systems or they come with the system. If you want to connect analog to a receiver, you just need to get some adapters to go from 3.5mm to RCA. One of those would get you a stereo signal while three of them connected to a 5.1 input from three analog outputs on you soundcard would get you true surround sound.

In addition to Cablesforless, there is also Monoprice as a source for affordable cables.

8. Bit-Perfect Info
Link to more info added from The Boston Dangler about bit-perfect playback
http://www.mp3car.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=88852

Post in here if you want me to add any more topics to this thread or if you want to correct me on anything I've said

 

YOyoYOhowsDAjello

Moderator<br>A/V & Home Theater<br>Elite member
Aug 6, 2001
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Thanks PurdueRy for some additions I've included now :thumbsup:

Anything else?
 
Mar 11, 2004
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You know, I think we should have a website made up to reference it all. I'm talking something that gives the basics (and of course you could build upon it more) of things that are definitive and not opinion. It just seems to be a better route as you can link to it easily. Obviously discussion is good, but something a bit easier to link to I think would be more beneficial. I've never been terribly fond of forums (and the thread format) as a basis for something like this, especially if it gets to be hundreds of pages long (AVSforum for instance is a major pain to navigate and find what you really need). I'm sure there are sites, perhaps even better ones than one that would just get started, but it just seems like a better option to me. And of course I understand hosting could be a potential problem, and everything so I won't mind if my thought is declined.

Maybe a bit about speaker cable as it seems to be another big snake oil bit for some companies (wasn't there a Monster branded cable upgrade for the Klipsch speakers that was like $80?).

Something else I note might be an issue is resistance ratings and things like that. You always see that with recievers and speakers, but I think most people don't know what it means.

Hmm, perhaps those two are a little more in depth and specific than your guide is intended for, as there's a lot more specs that people don't know much about (wattage, etc.) so feel free to ignore that.

Something you might consider is pointing out how a lot of motherboards have DTS-Connect and/or Dolby Digital Live capabilities. This is something I'm very fond of, although it doesn't seem like its found its way into a HTPC designed board yet.

Perhaps more info on DD/DTS.

Last thoughts would have to do with headphones. Maybe offer some insight into headphones technologies (such as Dolby Headphone and Creative and possibly Razer's solutions if the latter's sound card ever actually gets out).

Again just some thoughts so don't think I'll feel insulted if you think/say they're stupid. :D
 

YOyoYOhowsDAjello

Moderator<br>A/V & Home Theater<br>Elite member
Aug 6, 2001
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I intended this one to be a short and sweet one on digital audio topics.

I have my general audio thread that I haven't really finished yet and that one had a lot of the topics you mentioned.

I think I did mention integrated audio having some DDL / DTS capabilities in this thread though.

What's hard about linking to this thread btw?
 
Jun 25, 2002
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Awesome write up! I've done this several times to varying degrees, nice to have it pretty concise here. I'm gonna link back to this when people trumpet their X-Fi over digital out ;]
 

Ika

Lifer
Mar 22, 2006
14,267
3
81
Does this thread cover computers-as-source? I've been having a hard time grasping the concept of ASIO and bit-perfect output...
 

YOyoYOhowsDAjello

Moderator<br>A/V & Home Theater<br>Elite member
Aug 6, 2001
31,203
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Originally posted by: Aflac
Does this thread cover computers-as-source? I've been having a hard time grasping the concept of ASIO and bit-perfect output...

If someone wants to write something up, I can stick it in.
 

cheesehead

Lifer
Aug 11, 2000
10,079
0
0
IMHO, a good USB DAC (PCM2706 for USB-> I2S, and TDA1543s or the like for the DAC) is the best way to go. Cheap, too-TDA1543 DAC kits can be had for a whopping 40$ on eBay, and a USB->I2S adapter can be made for 10$.

As an added bonus, an outboard PSU is easy. Just run the TDA1543 and output stage off of a wall-wart with some big power filtering caps on it.
 

Ghouler

Senior member
Sep 9, 2005
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Originally posted by: YOyoYOhowsDAjello
One issue many people have with the digital connectivity on Creative sound cards is the upsampling algorithm it employs. The card takes all audio and upsamples it to 48KHz and outputs that out the digital connection. Most music is 44.1KHz and upsampling is a process often looked down upon in the audio world.[/b]

YOyo, this is all true up to one point: X-Fi card CAN upsample but it does not always upsample. I set mine to clock at 44.1 so it outputs bit-perfect
Could you insert following?

>>X-Fi cards can be set to output bit-perfect at 44.1kHz without upsampling. This is possible in Audio Creation Mode<<

Great Thread, Thanks MAN!



 

PurdueRy

Lifer
Nov 12, 2004
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Originally posted by: Ghouler
Originally posted by: YOyoYOhowsDAjello
One issue many people have with the digital connectivity on Creative sound cards is the upsampling algorithm it employs. The card takes all audio and upsamples it to 48KHz and outputs that out the digital connection. Most music is 44.1KHz and upsampling is a process often looked down upon in the audio world.[/b]

YOyo, this is all true up to one point: X-Fi card CAN upsample but it does not always upsample. I set mine to clock at 44.1 so it outputs bit-perfect
Could you insert following?

>>X-Fi cards can be set to output bit-perfect at 44.1kHz without upsampling. This is possible in Audio Creation Mode<<

Great Thread, Thanks MAN!

He's correct Jello. My bad, I was not aware that Creative had this "Tick" box in audio creation mode that finally allows you to get bit perfect playback
 

YOyoYOhowsDAjello

Moderator<br>A/V & Home Theater<br>Elite member
Aug 6, 2001
31,203
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Originally posted by: PurdueRy
Originally posted by: Ghouler
Originally posted by: YOyoYOhowsDAjello
One issue many people have with the digital connectivity on Creative sound cards is the upsampling algorithm it employs. The card takes all audio and upsamples it to 48KHz and outputs that out the digital connection. Most music is 44.1KHz and upsampling is a process often looked down upon in the audio world.[/b]

YOyo, this is all true up to one point: X-Fi card CAN upsample but it does not always upsample. I set mine to clock at 44.1 so it outputs bit-perfect
Could you insert following?

>>X-Fi cards can be set to output bit-perfect at 44.1kHz without upsampling. This is possible in Audio Creation Mode<<

Great Thread, Thanks MAN!

He's correct Jello. My bad, I was not aware that Creative had this "Tick" box in audio creation mode that finally allows you to get bit perfect playback

That's what I get for putting in your suggestions :| ;) :laugh:
 

YOyoYOhowsDAjello

Moderator<br>A/V & Home Theater<br>Elite member
Aug 6, 2001
31,203
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Does this look good?

"One issue many people have with the digital connectivity on Creative sound cards is the upsampling algorithm it employs. The card at times takes audio and upsamples it to 48KHz and outputs that out the digital connection. Most music is 44.1KHz and upsampling is a process often looked down upon in the audio world. After years of not having an option to disable upsampling on their Audigy series of cards, X-Fi cards can be set to output bit-perfect at 44.1kHz without upsampling. This is possible in Audio Creation Mode."
 

PurdueRy

Lifer
Nov 12, 2004
13,837
4
0
Originally posted by: YOyoYOhowsDAjello
Does this look good?

"One issue many people have with the digital connectivity on Creative sound cards is the upsampling algorithm it employs. The card at times takes audio and upsamples it to 48KHz and outputs that out the digital connection. Most music is 44.1KHz and upsampling is a process often looked down upon in the audio world. After years of not having an option to disable upsampling on their Audigy series of cards, X-Fi cards can be set to output bit-perfect at 44.1kHz without upsampling. This is possible in Audio Creation Mode."

Looks good :(

I am going to go end myself for providing inaccurate information...no on loves me anymore...the world is dying....the pain is too much....etc..etc...insert more emo here

:( why did this happen to meeeeeeee :(
 

YOyoYOhowsDAjello

Moderator<br>A/V & Home Theater<br>Elite member
Aug 6, 2001
31,203
45
91
Originally posted by: PurdueRy
Originally posted by: YOyoYOhowsDAjello
Does this look good?

"One issue many people have with the digital connectivity on Creative sound cards is the upsampling algorithm it employs. The card at times takes audio and upsamples it to 48KHz and outputs that out the digital connection. Most music is 44.1KHz and upsampling is a process often looked down upon in the audio world. After years of not having an option to disable upsampling on their Audigy series of cards, X-Fi cards can be set to output bit-perfect at 44.1kHz without upsampling. This is possible in Audio Creation Mode."

Looks good :(

I am going to go end myself for providing inaccurate information...no on loves me anymore...the world is dying....the pain is too much....etc..etc...insert more emo here

:( why did this happen to meeeeeeee :(

:laugh:

Go listen to your new RTi6s and cheer yourself up ;)
 

PurdueRy

Lifer
Nov 12, 2004
13,837
4
0
Originally posted by: YOyoYOhowsDAjello
Originally posted by: PurdueRy
Originally posted by: YOyoYOhowsDAjello
Does this look good?

"One issue many people have with the digital connectivity on Creative sound cards is the upsampling algorithm it employs. The card at times takes audio and upsamples it to 48KHz and outputs that out the digital connection. Most music is 44.1KHz and upsampling is a process often looked down upon in the audio world. After years of not having an option to disable upsampling on their Audigy series of cards, X-Fi cards can be set to output bit-perfect at 44.1kHz without upsampling. This is possible in Audio Creation Mode."

Looks good :(

I am going to go end myself for providing inaccurate information...no on loves me anymore...the world is dying....the pain is too much....etc..etc...insert more emo here

:( why did this happen to meeeeeeee :(

:laugh:

Go listen to your new RTi6s and cheer yourself up ;)

Even that is somewhat depressing because now I can no long enjoy music in my car....it sounds like crap in comparison :(

Hahaha just kidding I love it and when I am in my car I just think how much better these songs would sound at home....

Hey Jello...about that Sonz method...if it nets me an SVS...I might do it :lips:
 

YOyoYOhowsDAjello

Moderator<br>A/V & Home Theater<br>Elite member
Aug 6, 2001
31,203
45
91
Originally posted by: PurdueRy
Originally posted by: YOyoYOhowsDAjello
Originally posted by: PurdueRy
Originally posted by: YOyoYOhowsDAjello
Does this look good?

"One issue many people have with the digital connectivity on Creative sound cards is the upsampling algorithm it employs. The card at times takes audio and upsamples it to 48KHz and outputs that out the digital connection. Most music is 44.1KHz and upsampling is a process often looked down upon in the audio world. After years of not having an option to disable upsampling on their Audigy series of cards, X-Fi cards can be set to output bit-perfect at 44.1kHz without upsampling. This is possible in Audio Creation Mode."

Looks good :(

I am going to go end myself for providing inaccurate information...no on loves me anymore...the world is dying....the pain is too much....etc..etc...insert more emo here

:( why did this happen to meeeeeeee :(

:laugh:

Go listen to your new RTi6s and cheer yourself up ;)

Even that is somewhat depressing because now I can no long enjoy music in my car....it sounds like crap in comparison :(

Hahaha just kidding I love it and when I am in my car I just think how much better these songs would sound at home....

Hey Jello...about that Sonz method...if it nets me an SVS...I might do it :lips:

Oh, you looked it up? :laugh:

Just do yourself a favor and replace the Kenwood for Christmas or something.
 

PurdueRy

Lifer
Nov 12, 2004
13,837
4
0
Originally posted by: YOyoYOhowsDAjello
Originally posted by: PurdueRy
Originally posted by: YOyoYOhowsDAjello
Originally posted by: PurdueRy
Originally posted by: YOyoYOhowsDAjello
Does this look good?

"One issue many people have with the digital connectivity on Creative sound cards is the upsampling algorithm it employs. The card at times takes audio and upsamples it to 48KHz and outputs that out the digital connection. Most music is 44.1KHz and upsampling is a process often looked down upon in the audio world. After years of not having an option to disable upsampling on their Audigy series of cards, X-Fi cards can be set to output bit-perfect at 44.1kHz without upsampling. This is possible in Audio Creation Mode."

Looks good :(

I am going to go end myself for providing inaccurate information...no on loves me anymore...the world is dying....the pain is too much....etc..etc...insert more emo here

:( why did this happen to meeeeeeee :(

:laugh:

Go listen to your new RTi6s and cheer yourself up ;)

Even that is somewhat depressing because now I can no long enjoy music in my car....it sounds like crap in comparison :(

Hahaha just kidding I love it and when I am in my car I just think how much better these songs would sound at home....

Hey Jello...about that Sonz method...if it nets me an SVS...I might do it :lips:

Oh, you looked it up? :laugh:

Just do yourself a favor and replace the Kenwood for Christmas or something.

I think that will be the plan...work over xmas and get this "boombox" outta here...its puts out bass(only to 38 Hz) but its similar to what you hear in people who have "upgraded" their sound a bit too much in their Honda's
 

YOyoYOhowsDAjello

Moderator<br>A/V & Home Theater<br>Elite member
Aug 6, 2001
31,203
45
91
Originally posted by: PurdueRy
Originally posted by: YOyoYOhowsDAjello
Originally posted by: PurdueRy
Originally posted by: YOyoYOhowsDAjello
Originally posted by: PurdueRy
Originally posted by: YOyoYOhowsDAjello
Does this look good?

"One issue many people have with the digital connectivity on Creative sound cards is the upsampling algorithm it employs. The card at times takes audio and upsamples it to 48KHz and outputs that out the digital connection. Most music is 44.1KHz and upsampling is a process often looked down upon in the audio world. After years of not having an option to disable upsampling on their Audigy series of cards, X-Fi cards can be set to output bit-perfect at 44.1kHz without upsampling. This is possible in Audio Creation Mode."

Looks good :(

I am going to go end myself for providing inaccurate information...no on loves me anymore...the world is dying....the pain is too much....etc..etc...insert more emo here

:( why did this happen to meeeeeeee :(

:laugh:

Go listen to your new RTi6s and cheer yourself up ;)

Even that is somewhat depressing because now I can no long enjoy music in my car....it sounds like crap in comparison :(

Hahaha just kidding I love it and when I am in my car I just think how much better these songs would sound at home....

Hey Jello...about that Sonz method...if it nets me an SVS...I might do it :lips:

Oh, you looked it up? :laugh:

Just do yourself a favor and replace the Kenwood for Christmas or something.

I think that will be the plan...work over xmas and get this "boombox" outta here...its puts out bass(only to 38 Hz) but its similar to what you hear in people who have "upgraded" their sound a bit too much in their Honda's

oh my
 
Mar 11, 2004
23,099
5,578
146
Originally posted by: YOyoYOhowsDAjello
Originally posted by: PurdueRy
Originally posted by: YOyoYOhowsDAjello
Originally posted by: PurdueRy
Originally posted by: YOyoYOhowsDAjello
Originally posted by: PurdueRy
Originally posted by: YOyoYOhowsDAjello
Does this look good?

"One issue many people have with the digital connectivity on Creative sound cards is the upsampling algorithm it employs. The card at times takes audio and upsamples it to 48KHz and outputs that out the digital connection. Most music is 44.1KHz and upsampling is a process often looked down upon in the audio world. After years of not having an option to disable upsampling on their Audigy series of cards, X-Fi cards can be set to output bit-perfect at 44.1kHz without upsampling. This is possible in Audio Creation Mode."

Looks good :(

I am going to go end myself for providing inaccurate information...no on loves me anymore...the world is dying....the pain is too much....etc..etc...insert more emo here

:( why did this happen to meeeeeeee :(

:laugh:

Go listen to your new RTi6s and cheer yourself up ;)

Even that is somewhat depressing because now I can no long enjoy music in my car....it sounds like crap in comparison :(

Hahaha just kidding I love it and when I am in my car I just think how much better these songs would sound at home....

Hey Jello...about that Sonz method...if it nets me an SVS...I might do it :lips:

Oh, you looked it up? :laugh:

Just do yourself a favor and replace the Kenwood for Christmas or something.

I think that will be the plan...work over xmas and get this "boombox" outta here...its puts out bass(only to 38 Hz) but its similar to what you hear in people who have "upgraded" their sound a bit too much in their Honda's

oh my

The things we do for audio. :D

Got that SVS this week Jello. Its nice and big. Haven't had a chance to really see what it can do yet though, hopefully will tonight. I'm also planning to buy an Infocus 4805 again. Been up all night changing crap in my apartment for it. I think I'm gonna sell off my Polk's and possibly buy a few pairs of the Insignia's for a 6.1 setup so that I can save up some money for something nicer.
 

KermitInKanata

Junior Member
Oct 20, 2006
2
0
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Nice thread YOyo guy, but I have one question. I have the X-Fi card, and would like to attach it to my receiver for movies and such via the digital connection (since the analog is going to my computer speakers, and the digital would only be one cable). The question is though, do I need a special cable to go from what appears to be a 3.5mm jack to the standard RCA jack for digital coax cable?

Thanks
 

PurdueRy

Lifer
Nov 12, 2004
13,837
4
0
Originally posted by: KermitInKanata
Nice thread YOyo guy, but I have one question. I have the X-Fi card, and would like to attach it to my receiver for movies and such via the digital connection (since the analog is going to my computer speakers, and the digital would only be one cable). The question is though, do I need a special cable to go from what appears to be a 3.5mm jack to the standard RCA jack for digital coax cable?

Thanks

just get a 3.5mm mono or stereo to RCA converter you can find at any radio shack for $4.00. Then any normal RCA cable to go from your computer to your receiver
 

KermitInKanata

Junior Member
Oct 20, 2006
2
0
0
Ok, I've tried that, but still no sound. Does it matter the length of the adaptor cable? Because it is 6 feet, and I don't know if it is 75 Ohms or not. The receiver doesn't seem to be picking up the digital stream. I'm using VLC and I think I've set everything right in it and the X-Fi Audio Console.

EDIT: OK, I got it. There was the one setting hidden in the audio properties to enable Digital IO. I figured doing this in VLC and the audio console would be enough, but no. Thanks for the help guys.