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Confirmed - i9 9900k will have soldered IHS, no more toothpaste TIM

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jpiniero

Diamond Member
Oct 1, 2010
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I doubt it was done for any reason other than to get more cores and higher clocks to work within the current node and packaging.
More like marketing. It's not going to be any faster than an overclocked 8700K in games (and really an overclocked 8600K), so gotta have something I guess.

9600K being solder would make me think it could be a cut 8 core.
 

LTC8K6

Lifer
Mar 10, 2004
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More like marketing. It's not going to be any faster than an overclocked 8700K in games (and really an overclocked 8600K), so gotta have something I guess.

9600K being solder would make me think it could be a cut 8 core.
You can't compare apples to oranges. If you are overclocking the 8700K, then you have to overclock the 9900K.
 

LTC8K6

Lifer
Mar 10, 2004
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I really want to know if Intel is actually releasing all of those in-between chips...

8020
8120
8320
8420
8550
8650
8650K
8670
G4930
G4950
G5420
G5620
???
 

jpiniero

Diamond Member
Oct 1, 2010
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You can't compare apples to oranges. If you are overclocking the 8700K, then you have to overclock the 9900K.
I doubt you will get much over 5, maybe 5.2 or 5.3. Which is within the range of Coffee Lake gets. If Intel wanted to win the stock benchmark scores, they should have increased the stock memory speed. Maybe with Coffee Lake Refresh Refresh.

I do want to know if it is including the Smeltdown fixes that Whiskey Lake has. My guess is no, esp since Skylake-X refresh won't.
 

LTC8K6

Lifer
Mar 10, 2004
28,523
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I doubt you will get much over 5, maybe 5.2 or 5.3. Which is within the range of Coffee Lake gets.

I do want to know if it is including the Smeltdown fixes that Whiskey Lake has. My guess is no, esp since Skylake-X refresh won't.
No, it won't have the silicon fixes. I don't think that was ever even suggested for CFL-R.
 

coercitiv

Diamond Member
Jan 24, 2014
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Skylake X is a lot different, starting with a larger package.
The larger package that fits up to 125% more cores than CFL-R will?

The same Skylake-X that had problems with being thermally limited while overclocking even with very good water cooling? If anything TIM on Skylake-X was a real showcase of how not to present high performance CPUs to the enthusiast market. (not talking about professionals, they would mostly stick to stock clocks anyway)
 

LTC8K6

Lifer
Mar 10, 2004
28,523
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The larger package that fits up to 125% more cores than CFL-R will?

The same Skylake-X that had problems with being thermally limited while overclocking even with very good water cooling? If anything TIM on Skylake-X was a real showcase of how not to present high performance CPUs to the enthusiast market. (not talking about professionals, they would mostly stick to stock clocks anyway)
So maybe they have soldered those too?
 

jpiniero

Diamond Member
Oct 1, 2010
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I should add that Skylake-X Refresh is likely to be branded 8th gen; since they are still at this point intending to release Cascade Lake-X next year.
 

coercitiv

Diamond Member
Jan 24, 2014
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Would Intel have a K and an X processors with the same number?
Because someone in the marketing dep. might have had the brilliant idea of skipping the 8000 SKL-X series and align mainstream and HEDT, which would have been great if not for the fact that i9 branding added new numbers in the SKU list, creating the overlap.

We might as well wait for the official info though.
 

The Stilt

Golden Member
Dec 5, 2015
1,709
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More cores? Skylake-X is using TIM.
Skylake-X die is significantly larger as well.
Around 77 - 265% larger (LCC, HCC).

If we use Intel specs for Pmax (PL2), i.e. 118.75W for 95W TDP SKUs and 206.25W for 165W TDP SKUs, the intensity on a 182mm² 95W TDP SKU is > 53% higher than on 484mm² 165W TDP SKU.
I'd take the lower intensity with conventional TIM, over the significantly higher intensity and sTIM any day. sTIM is superior compared to conventional TIM, but it can't do miracles if the intensity is too high to begin with.
 

jpiniero

Diamond Member
Oct 1, 2010
8,294
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PL2 is always 1.25 * PL1, at stock.
Has been since Haswell, or possibly even earlier.

PL1 = TDP, which for 9900K is supposed to still be 95W.
Intel's been jacking up the PL2. I believe the stock PL2 on the quad core 15 W parts is like 44 or something.
 

Kenmitch

Diamond Member
Oct 10, 1999
8,071
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Google translate for English speakers: We took solder from you when competition ceased to exist. Now that things are messy again we bring it back and admit it has tangible benefits. Game with confidence!
Sadly those who purchase wont' even thank AMD for more cores, lower price points, and once again a soldered chip. Intel must be scared by what Zen 2 may bring to the table. Will be interesting to see how the story unfolds in the coming months.
 

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