Brain damaged BestBuy TV shopper

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Charmonium

Diamond Member
May 15, 2015
7,073
949
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Is Comcast's Xfinity considered a "...good internet connection..." these days, Charmonium?

I don't mean this in any facetious way...I'm really interested in why a dumb TV might be a good idea.
I don't know anything about comcast but if you have a cable connection, that should give you enough bandwith for 1080i (interlaced) streaming. But some ISPs have different tiers of service and even though with the latest DOCSIS 3.x modems you should be able to get very high transfer rates (between 50 and 100 megabits per second), your service tier might throttle you down to something much lower.
 

Pacfanweb

Lifer
Jan 2, 2000
13,148
56
91

Not really, we just noticed that the "best looking" -- a very subjective phrase, I know -- televisions we've looked at seem to top out at the 55-inch category at around $1,700.00 USD.

There's a lot of good input in this thread, already, but your point about screen size is well taken. In short, we are not opposed to a larger screen, if it's available in our price range.

By the way, are "dumb" televisions a bad idea for some reason? I'm asking because we value privacy and some of the posts I'm reading remind me of the other "BB" (not Best Buy), if you know what I mean. :hmm:

Once again, thanks for your time...
Most TV's are "smart" now. Not that many dumb ones anymore.

I'd agree with using an external source for you apps, though. Typically, something made to do apps is going to do it better than a TV, which is primarily made to display a picture.
Plus the whole upgrades/updates/new apps thing, which a smart TV might not keep up with as well.

You can get a 65", smart 4k TV all day long for less than 1700 bucks. And a name brand, too, like Samsung. That'd be one of their lower tier TV's, but still would look fine. You could get a 60" and step up a bit, for around the same price.
 

videogames101

Diamond Member
Aug 24, 2005
6,777
18
81
I recently purchased a 65" samsung 4k for like $1300 and it looks damn fine. I wouldn't pay $1700 for a 55", unless you are quite concerned with the best possible picture quality.

That being said, I don't think Samsung is known for their reliability.
 

Pacfanweb

Lifer
Jan 2, 2000
13,148
56
91
I recently purchased a 65" samsung 4k for like $1300 and it looks damn fine. I wouldn't pay $1700 for a 55", unless you are quite concerned with the best possible picture quality.

That being said, I don't think Samsung is known for their reliability.
Samsung is a top-rated brand.
 

Dude111

Golden Member
Jan 19, 2010
1,495
5
81
AntiHypocrite said:
The Mrs. says it's high time that we got with the program and bought something to replace our 35" JVC CRT television (complete with illegible type/fonts).
Im sorry but why let her push you around???

Keep what you have if you like it..... Maybe just put it in another room
(CRTs are 1000% better)
 

AntiHypocrite

Member
Dec 20, 2015
56
14
81
Im sorry but why let her push you around???

Keep what you have if you like it..... Maybe just put it in another room
(CRTs are 1000% better)
That's a very good question, Dude...but we haven't purchased a new TV in about 15 years and she's simply asking for something that will make the Comcast channel guide legible (and she has a good point).

I had my way for a LONG time, so I'm pretty happy about the situation, in general.
:D
 

MustISO

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
11,928
12
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I'm still rocking a Sony rear-projection HDTV. It's from 2002/2003 and works great. Still love the PQ although it could certainly use a calibration. We've got a Samsung smart TV for the bedroom and it's been fine but I find that all modern TVs look too digital and processed. Plasma (if they still made them) was the best picture IMO. I'd like to hold out for OLED but that's going to take a while to mature.

If I replace my current TV it'll be with a 55"-60" either LG, Samsung or Sony. I don't think you can go wrong with a top tier brand and there are plenty of review sites out there if you want to know what to look out for.

One other thing to consider is the TVs in the store are typically not calibrated well and a good TV can look bad if it has a bad source or poor settings.

Personally if I buy in the next two years it'll be something in the $600-$800 range.

We have comcast as well and the old DVRs had much better readability for the guide. The X1 platform was designed by an idiot. Who puts blue text on a black background?? The font does need to be easier to read as well. They could make the text slightly larger without losing any functionality.
 

AntiHypocrite

Member
Dec 20, 2015
56
14
81
Most TV's are "smart" now. Not that many dumb ones anymore.

I'd agree with using an external source for you apps, though. Typically, something made to do apps is going to do it better than a TV, which is primarily made to display a picture.
Plus the whole upgrades/updates/new apps thing, which a smart TV might not keep up with as well.

You can get a 65", smart 4k TV all day long for less than 1700 bucks. And a name brand, too, like Samsung. That'd be one of their lower tier TV's, but still would look fine. You could get a 60" and step up a bit, for around the same price.


You seem to pretty knowledgeable on the subject, PAC Fan. I'd like to get your thoughts on reliability and -- if it's not too much trouble -- a recommendation on which TV you would be looking at (if you were now in the market).

Thanks for your time...
 

AntiHypocrite

Member
Dec 20, 2015
56
14
81
I'm still rocking a Sony rear-projection HDTV. It's from 2002/2003 and works great. Still love the PQ although it could certainly use a calibration. We've got a Samsung smart TV for the bedroom and it's been fine but I find that all modern TVs look too digital and processed. Plasma (if they still made them) was the best picture IMO. I'd like to hold out for OLED but that's going to take a while to mature.

If I replace my current TV it'll be with a 55"-60" either LG, Samsung or Sony. I don't think you can go wrong with a top tier brand and there are plenty of review sites out there if you want to know what to look out for.

One other thing to consider is the TVs in the store are typically not calibrated well and a good TV can look bad if it has a bad source or poor settings.

Personally if I buy in the next two years it'll be something in the $600-$800 range.

We have comcast as well and the old DVRs had much better readability for the guide. The X1 platform was designed by an idiot. Who puts blue text on a black background?? The font does need to be easier to read as well. They could make the text slightly larger without losing any functionality.
Has anything in a particular caught your eye, ISO?
 

MustISO

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
11,928
12
81


You seem to pretty knowledgeable on the subject, PAC Fan. I'd like to get your thoughts on reliability and -- if it's not too much trouble -- a recommendation on which TV you would be looking at (if you were now in the market).

Thanks for your time...
Reliability with electronics is a guessing game. While the top brands may be more reliable than the cheaper Chinese brands, any TV can fail prematurely. Over the past 15 years we've had Sony and Samsung TVs. The Samsung is 3 years old and going strong. One Sony is 15 years old and works like a champ, the other Sony is 12 years old and going strong. Seems like the older sets were built a little better.

See if you have a credit card that extends the warranty of the TV. Some do and that would give you an extra year. If the TV makes it through the first 2 years I would guess it'll last a while.
 

MustISO

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
11,928
12
81
Has anything in a particular caught your eye, ISO?
I like the Samsungs, Sony and LG that are mid to high in their model lineup. I've read quite a bit on http://www.rtings.com and I've been to the store. Properly setup they all look about the same in the same price ranges.

With 4K material the UHD sets look fantastic but I'm not opposed to getting a 1080P set as I don't think we'll be viewing any 4K content for a while.
 

cmdrdredd

Lifer
Dec 12, 2001
27,038
344
126
Most TV's are "smart" now. Not that many dumb ones anymore.



I'd agree with using an external source for you apps, though. Typically, something made to do apps is going to do it better than a TV, which is primarily made to display a picture.

Plus the whole upgrades/updates/new apps thing, which a smart TV might not keep up with as well.



You can get a 65", smart 4k TV all day long for less than 1700 bucks. And a name brand, too, like Samsung. That'd be one of their lower tier TV's, but still would look fine. You could get a 60" and step up a bit, for around the same price.

It depends on the tv. Right now for 4K HDR programming you need to use he built in apps on the tv and the tv isn't that slow these days with fast CPUs.

Anyway I think the OP should look into going bigger with another brand that isn't a Sony or Samsung. I have seen nothing to suggest they will benefit from HDR or the latest smart apps and things like that.
 
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AntiHypocrite

Member
Dec 20, 2015
56
14
81
It depends on the tv. Right now for 4K HDR programming you need to use he built in apps on the tv and the tv isn't that slow these days with fast CPUs.

Anyway I think the OP should look into going bigger with another brand that isn't a Sony or Samsung. I have seen nothing to suggest they will benefit from HDR or the latest smart apps and things like that.
I appreciate your thoughts, Commander Dredd, but do you have anything in particular in mind?...something I could actually look up and read about.

Thanks for your time...
 

HeXen

Diamond Member
Dec 13, 2009
7,828
35
91
I'm still happy with my 1080p 55". My comcast isn't even in 1080p, still has coaxials on the box so no need for 4k.
 

cmdrdredd

Lifer
Dec 12, 2001
27,038
344
126
I appreciate your thoughts, Commander Dredd, but do you have anything in particular in mind?...something I could actually look up and read about.

Thanks for your time...
VIZIO M65-C1 65-Inch 4K Ultra HD Smart LED TV which I suggested earlier is $1398 on Amazon. It has a full array backlight, good contrast ratio, rates fairly well for the money. No 3D or HDR but you did not indicate you were interested in that.

http://smile.amazon.com/VIZIO-M65-C1-65-Inch-Ultra-Smart/dp/B00T63YUDK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1450755651&sr=8-1&keywords=vizio+M65

Review here http://www.rtings.com/tv/reviews/vizio/m-series-2015
 

Dude111

Golden Member
Jan 19, 2010
1,495
5
81
AntiHypocrite said:
That's a very good question, Dude...but we haven't purchased a new TV in about 15 years and she's simply asking for something that will make the Comcast channel guide legible (and she has a good point).

I had my way for a LONG time, so I'm pretty happy about the situation, in general.
:D
I hear ya mate.......I didnt mean to sound mean or anything :)
 

AntiHypocrite

Member
Dec 20, 2015
56
14
81
VIZIO M65-C1 65-Inch 4K Ultra HD Smart LED TV which I suggested earlier is $1398 on Amazon. It has a full array backlight, good contrast ratio, rates fairly well for the money. No 3D or HDR but you did not indicate you were interested in that.

http://smile.amazon.com/VIZIO-M65-C1-65-Inch-Ultra-Smart/dp/B00T63YUDK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1450755651&sr=8-1&keywords=vizio+M65

Review here http://www.rtings.com/tv/reviews/vizio/m-series-2015
Sorry, Cmdr. Dredd, but I got so used to seeing the extended part numbers that I never thought that "M65" was a specific television. My rookie mistake.

Thanks again for your time...
 

AntiHypocrite

Member
Dec 20, 2015
56
14
81
After researching TV's with an eye toward reliability, I couldn't find one of the common brands that didn't have at least a few people who said that it had died early. Then I remembered that both my partner and I had Philips CRT's that lasted well past fifteen years and were still going. Then I remembered that when I was in a hospital medical imaging department, all the monitors were Philips. So I looked into them and they had no comments like, "It died in two years," such as the more common brands had. So we got a Philips and couldn't be happier.
Which Philips TV did you purchase, Bradly?
 

Cardio

Senior member
Jun 11, 2003
903
0
76
I think that if you can find them on display somewhere the LG OLED 55" 55EG9100 which can be had for less than $1700 will be the best you can find. Although it's user interface is somewhat different from "classic" style it is easy to use.

"LG's OLED sets have it's own issues. Lots of people are returning them and getting something else, but anyhow you're bringing us way off the topic of the original post for which OLED isn't an option."

They aren't returned anymore than any other set in that price range. We have sold scores of them and none have been returned. If the "OLED isn't an option" refers to price, the 55" LG 55EG9100 can be had for around $1549 with a little looking around. At Amazon they are also less than $1700. "Best" is a relatively subjective term ... just let your own eyes decide.
 

AntiHypocrite

Member
Dec 20, 2015
56
14
81
Your instincts are correct, Cardio. I don't know a thing about OLED, so it was price that prompted the quote you used...which wasn't my post, by the way. If OLED is a better system, then, by all means, I'll try to find one and give it a look.

Thanks for the great post...
 

slashbinslashbash

Golden Member
Feb 29, 2004
1,945
8
81
There's no reason to spend that much money on a TV right now, especially if you're upgrading from a 35". TV's are manufactured like semiconductors now (and thus subject to some version of Moore's Law) and therefore behave more like computers than furniture; i.e., something that your average consumer is going to upgrade on a 3-5 year schedule rather than a 10-15 year schedule.

Spend $800 or less on a 55" Samsung, LG, or Vizio; enjoy it for 3-5 years, and put the remaining $900 away to spend on a new TV in 3-5 years when 4K will be dirt cheap (some would argue that it is already dirt cheap) and OLED should be well within the mainstream, and who knows, maybe even some newer technology than OLED will be out. When you do upgrade, you can move the 55" to the bedroom or other secondary place, much as you might hand an older smartphone, tablet, or laptop to a secondary user such as a child or a parent after you upgrade.

The stuff that you can get for under $1000 now (i.e., 4K TV's) were literally $15,000-$20,000 less than 5 years ago. The same process happened with standard HD plasmas and LCDs. The technology is moving stupidly fast. Buying mid-market just doesn't make any sense. (I.e.: Most people can't tell the difference.... and stores like Best Buy make a lot of profit by purposely making the cheaper TV's look worse by not calibrating them properly on the showroom floor!) An $800 55" 1080p screen from your choice of manufacturers should be plenty good for even the most picky viewer. The only way you should spend more is if you get a 4K TV, which really doesn't make sense for most people right now as there simply aren't enough 4K things to watch.

http://www.examiner.com/article/samsung-unveils-first-75-inch-led-lcd-tv-angry-birds-coming-with-it

^^This is an article from 2012 about Samsung's release of their first 75" LCD/LED TV. It sold for $10,000. You can now buy an equivalent (or better) TV at Walmart for $2,000.

http://www.engadget.com/2013/04/07/sony-4k-tv-pricing/

^^This is an article from when Sony first introduced "affordable" 4K TV's in 2013. The 55" was $5000 and the 65" was $7000. You can now buy comparable TV's for under $1000 and under $1500, respectively.

That is how fast the market is moving. The price consistently goes down by 70-80% in less than 4 years. In 2-3 years you will be kicking yourself for paying $1700 for a TV that will at that point be selling for $600.
 

poofyhairguy

Lifer
Nov 20, 2005
14,612
318
126
If OLED is a better system, then, by all means, I'll try to find one and give it a look.
OLED is the best TV technology on the market. Many discount it due to cost and the fact that it only comes from one TV maker, but nothing beats them right now.
 

mvbighead

Diamond Member
Apr 20, 2009
3,793
1
81
I have to say, I am quite a bit baffled at a guy going from a standard definition CRT television to a $1700 55". I guess I lie more on the thrifty side however, and my last big TV was a $900 60" LG. For me, most of the quality is derived from the device pushing the content (once you get to HD anyway). There are somethings some devices do better than others, but I find it hard to believe you can get that much more out of a 1700 dollar TV vs a 900 one.

For me, I simply look at TVs both on Amazon and in store where possible. Try to look for ones that are rated highly among the masses, and available locally. Then check them out in person and if the price is right and quality is good, buy.

Heck one of the last TVs I purchased was a 48" 1080P Sony 60hz from Walmart for 348 that I found via dealnews.com. Love that TV and it is hooked to a FireTV for content. I am sure there are some very good TVs out there, but I just don't see much past the 1080 and 4k bits. Quality on some devices is definitely lacking, but that's not every device sitting in those lower price points. I guess I must not have the eye that some folks do.
 

cmdrdredd

Lifer
Dec 12, 2001
27,038
344
126
Sorry, Cmdr. Dredd, but I got so used to seeing the extended part numbers that I never thought that "M65" was a specific television. My rookie mistake.



Thanks again for your time...

Yeah the vizio lines for 2015 list the series with a letter. M in this case followed by the screen size. So m65 is a 65" M series tv. The P series is the next step up I believe.
 

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