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Best Rice Cooker

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Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
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-These 'expensive' ones are pressure cookers (top shelf), as you can see the big turning knobs. The rice is cooked in a pressure which results in an undeniably moist, chewier, and tastier rice.
Whaaaaaat is this madness?! My fuzzy logic rice cooker is now obsolete! Where do I buy this pressure cooker model stateside :eek:

Also great analogy on keeping a loaf of bread around, never thought of it that way.
 

ponyo

Lifer
Feb 14, 2002
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Well, I caved. Costco has the Aroma Rice Cooker with 'SensorLogic' technology (I assume their own version of fuzzy logic) and I cooked some up last night. Like an idiot, I used my own measuring cup instead of their 3/4 one, so I had more rice than I was supposed to for that quantity of water. When it beeped indicating it was done, it was just lightly firm, but looked perfect. After 5-10 minutes on the warmer mode, it was great. It was by far better than any rice I had cooked in a pan, and I had gotten close to good some times with the standard pot method.

Easily, the best $30 I've spent on an appliance.
We tried the Aroma rice cooker from Costco. It's one of the few products we returned to Costco. Aroma made decent rice. The problem wasn't cooking the rice but keeping the rice warm without drying it out after cooking. That's where all the cheap rice cookers fail and biggest difference between $30 or $150 cookers. The expensive ones can store and keep rice overnight in edible form. But $30 rice cooker is still superior to a pan when it comes to rice storage. You pretty much have to make fried rice with leftover pan made rice as you can't store it at all.
 

Zeze

Lifer
Mar 4, 2011
10,265
485
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Whaaaaaat is this madness?! My fuzzy logic rice cooker is now obsolete! Where do I buy this pressure cooker model stateside :eek:

Also great analogy on keeping a loaf of bread around, never thought of it that way.
They're everywhere in any Korean market or even craptons of them in Amazon. Search for 'pressure ricer cooker'.
 

ponyo

Lifer
Feb 14, 2002
17,959
1,628
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Whaaaaaat is this madness?! My fuzzy logic rice cooker is now obsolete! Where do I buy this pressure cooker model stateside :eek:

Also great analogy on keeping a loaf of bread around, never thought of it that way.
The best pressure cookers are made by Cuckoo. The expensive models will talk and voice guide you before and after cooking. But all pressure cooker models need more maintenance than regular cooker. You have to replace the rubber seal about once a year to two years.
 

Ns1

No Lifer
Jun 17, 2001
55,399
1,510
126
I bought a similar model 11 yrs ago (Zojirushi 10 cups induction) and it seemed nuts at the time. Over the years it's more than paid for itself and the unit is still going strong even after working several times a week all this time. It still cooks perfect rice every time and consistent whether I cook 2 cups or 10 cups and keeps it for a few days - this is where the cheap units fail. I'm glad I did since we eat lots of rice and makes it all worthwhile. I'm cheap but there are things worth splurging on.
I even bring it with me when I go camping (assuming there are outlets)
 

Zeze

Lifer
Mar 4, 2011
10,265
485
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The best pressure cookers are made by Cuckoo. The expensive models will talk and voice guide you before and after cooking. But all pressure cooker models need more maintenance than regular cooker. You have to replace the rubber seal about once a year to two years.
Hahhah yup, mine is Cuckoo. And I didn't even buy it, my parents did.

I think Cuckoo is the go-to high-quality rice cooker.
 

Zeze

Lifer
Mar 4, 2011
10,265
485
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I even bring it with me when I go camping (assuming there are outlets)
Yup! Holy crap that brings me memories.

You can cook the rice at home and bring the whole damn thing with you to the beach unplugged. It'll naturally keep warm.

Our family did this (and presumably most Koreans) whenever we went to the beach. We would use the public beach grill to cook our delicious Korean BBQ, bring our side dishes, and steaming hot rice from the rice cooker.

Now THAT was an amazing full-on meal had at the beach. We thought it was funny and felt bad for westerners cooking boring burgers and hot dogs while we ate up a feast.
 

Zeze

Lifer
Mar 4, 2011
10,265
485
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I always pack rice cooker and a box of ramen noodles for vacation if we're staying in a condo.
There's a certain joy to eating Asian cup o' noodles by the campfire from the water heated by it.



I guess it's similar to eating s'mores.
 

Ns1

No Lifer
Jun 17, 2001
55,399
1,510
126
Yup! Holy crap that brings me memories.

You can cook the rice at home and bring the whole damn thing with you to the beach unplugged. It'll naturally keep warm.

Our family did this (and presumably most Koreans) whenever we went to the beach. We would use the public beach grill to cook our delicious Korean BBQ, bring our side dishes, and steaming hot rice from the rice cooker.

Now THAT was an amazing full-on meal had at the beach. We thought it was funny and felt bad for westerners cooking boring burgers and hot dogs while we ate up a feast.
how do you keep the sand out of the banchan? :biggrin:
 

ponyo

Lifer
Feb 14, 2002
17,959
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There's a certain joy to eating Asian cup o' noodles by the campfire from the water heated by it.



I guess it's similar to eating s'mores.
I only eat cup noodles if I'm staying in a hotel. If I'm staying in a condo with a kitchen, I cook regular ramen in a pan. I like adding seafood I catch at the beach to my ramen. I throw in the catch of the day like blue crabs, mussels, and scallops. You can't really do that with cup noodles. Plus I don't like the texture of cup noodles.
 

Zeze

Lifer
Mar 4, 2011
10,265
485
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I only eat cup noodles if I'm staying in a hotel. If I'm staying in a condo with a kitchen, I cook regular ramen in a pan. I like adding seafood I catch at the beach to my ramen. I throw in the catch of the day like blue crabs, mussels, and scallops. You can't really do that with cup noodles. Plus I don't like the texture of cup noodles.
:thumbsup:
 

abaez

Diamond Member
Jan 28, 2000
7,158
1
81
Dishwasher and Microwave also save a fair amount of time and labour, a rice cooker does not. I just don't see the value added; like I said I make all of my rice in a saucepan with no issues whatsoever. Of course I am a kitchen gadget guy, so buy whatever floats your boat, I just don't see the need for that particular device.

KT
I can put a timer on my rice cooker to start cooking at a certain time and right when I get home the rice is ready to eat.

And also the fact that I can keep rice overnight in it nice and warm for the next day.

Plus the fact that I don't even have to watch it. Just dump water and rice and go away and I don't even have to worry.

And also that it makes perfect rice every time.

All of that is very convenient and saves quite a bit of time.

Plus you can't even do this in a saucepan: http://en.rocketnews24.com/2011/12/12/we-cook-a-big-mac-value-meal-in-a-rice-cooker-triumphant-results/ BOOM.
 

mvbighead

Diamond Member
Apr 20, 2009
3,793
1
81
We tried the Aroma rice cooker from Costco. It's one of the few products we returned to Costco. Aroma made decent rice. The problem wasn't cooking the rice but keeping the rice warm without drying it out after cooking. That's where all the cheap rice cookers fail and biggest difference between $30 or $150 cookers. The expensive ones can store and keep rice overnight in edible form. But $30 rice cooker is still superior to a pan when it comes to rice storage. You pretty much have to make fried rice with leftover pan made rice as you can't store it at all.
Yeah, I had read that elsewhere. For me, even though I screwed up the quantities, the rice was better than I've made in a LONG time.

As for the heating function, I just throw my left overs in a plastic container in the fridge. I put a few tablespoons of water, throw it in the microwave for 2 minutes, and it's not quite as good but still better than what I made in a pan.

At this time, I can't see spending $200 on a similar yet better appliance, but $30 is well worth it for what I got.
 

KeithTalent

Elite Member | Administrator | No Lifer
Administrator
Nov 30, 2005
50,243
110
116
I can put a timer on my rice cooker to start cooking at a certain time and right when I get home the rice is ready to eat.

And also the fact that I can keep rice overnight in it nice and warm for the next day.

Plus the fact that I don't even have to watch it. Just dump water and rice and go away and I don't even have to worry.

And also that it makes perfect rice every time.

All of that is very convenient and saves quite a bit of time.

Plus you can't even do this in a saucepan: http://en.rocketnews24.com/2011/12/12/we-cook-a-big-mac-value-meal-in-a-rice-cooker-triumphant-results/ BOOM.
Good lawd that looks nauseating. D:

I cook rice a few times a week and have yet to feel the need for a rice cooker, but I'm sure I'll end up with one especially after a few more months of effectively living in Chinatown.

KT
 

Dirigible

Diamond Member
Apr 26, 2006
5,950
7
81
You bastards!

My new rice cooker is supposed to be delivered some time today. :oops: :awe:
 

K1052

Lifer
Aug 21, 2003
35,113
8,383
136
I have the Zojirushi NS-LAC05. It's pretty versatile and there are recipes for other stuff besides rice. I use it often to make steel cut oatmeal by putting it on the timer function overnight which lets the oats soak and it's ready in the morning.

I'll never do rice on the stovetop again since this consistently turns out a better product without having to attend to it.
 

SphinxnihpS

Diamond Member
Feb 17, 2005
8,368
23
81
We get home from work. I start the rice cooker. After running/taking the dogs to the park, we pick-up Indian food and come home to a warm batch of basmati rice.

Should we have gotten home first, one of us starts cooking rice and the other goes to pick-up dinner? Time saver, yes.
No. Because you can do this in Corningware/Pyrex in a microwave, it comes out perfect every time (once you get the time YOUR microwave takes to make rice to suit YOUR taste), you can leave it and go with no worries of burning anything, and when you're done you can throw the cookware in the dish washer or leave them for your wife.

Corningware casserole with lid with lid $20.
 

Capt Caveman

Lifer
Jan 30, 2005
34,528
621
126
No. Because you can do this in Corningware/Pyrex in a microwave, it comes out perfect every time (once you get the time YOUR microwave takes to make rice to suit YOUR taste), you can leave it and go with no worries of burning anything, and when you're done you can throw the cookware in the dish washer or leave them for your wife.

Corningware casserole with lid with lid $20.
Not sure if serious. No, the microwave doesn't do a better job than a rice cooker. If we're gone for a couple of hours, it's not going to stay warm. Etc...
 

JulesMaximus

No Lifer
Jul 3, 2003
74,098
586
126
I picked up one of these at Costco last month:



Makes VERY good rice. MUCH better than I've ever been able to make on the stove.

Is it "THE BEST" rice cooker? I doubt it, but for about $30...it does a damned good job.
Sorry Boomer, I don't mean to single you out for your post but I still LOL every time I see someone post something like this. There are two ingredients to cooked rice: Rice and Water. The only thing you add is heat and time.

I should market a pasta cooker to Italian people. Probably make me a millionaire. :D
 
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Ns1

No Lifer
Jun 17, 2001
55,399
1,510
126
I should market a pasta cooker to Italian people. Probably make me a millionaire. :D
If you could invent a pasta cooker that keeps pasta warm and al dente, you would be.

Your argument could easily be applied to making coffee as well...
 

ponyo

Lifer
Feb 14, 2002
17,959
1,628
126
I was actually amazed by the low price of the $30 rice cooker at Costco. It's hard to buy decent pan for $30 now. $30 for electronic machine is pretty amazing if you think about it.
 
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