Best Rice Cooker

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polarmystery

Diamond Member
Aug 21, 2005
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#1
I've been looking for a decent rice cooker that will cook both white and brown rice, but I don't know what I'm looking for. I'd probably spend upwards of $150 if it's of good quality. However, I'm completely ignorant to brand and functionality. Anybody have any info/feedback?

Cheers.
 

waggy

No Lifer
Dec 14, 2000
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#2
$150 for a rice cooker? hope you eat a lot of rice.
 
Apr 10, 2000
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#5
http://www.amazon.com/Zojirushi-NS-Z...hi+rice+cooker

Is the one I got. I used to think these were such a waste of money but holy crap I love mine. It comes out perfect everytime and the warming function keeps the rice warm for hours on end without drying it out. I also like how I can schedule the rice to cook. I set mine to be ready at 7:00pm so that by the time I get home, I've got hot rice waiting for me.
 

Vic Vega

Diamond Member
Sep 24, 2010
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#8
You guys understand "rice cookers" are literally a metal bowl sitting on a hot plate with a timer glued on some cheap plastic, right?
 

Vic Vega

Diamond Member
Sep 24, 2010
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#9
Well that cheapo rice cooker is nice because I don't need to waste stove space when I'm cooking other stuff. Just toss the rice in there and forget it. :p
I guess I can see that point. I don't usually have all five burners going on my stove though.
 

polarmystery

Diamond Member
Aug 21, 2005
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#10
I guess I can see that point. I don't usually have all five burners going on my stove though.
This is also my problem. I need the stove space.

And yes, I eat a lot of rice. I guess $150 is too much?

Edit: Saw the links to other cookers, maybe that's in the right ballpark.
 
Last edited:
Oct 20, 2005
10,979
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#11
This is also my problem. I need the stove space.

And yes, I eat a lot of rice. I guess $150 is too much?

Edit: Saw the links to other cookers, maybe that's in the right ballpark.
$150 is waaaaaaay too much.

Don't spend more than like $30. Even fancier ones aren't anywhere near $150, maybe $50.
 

PenguinPower

Platinum Member
Apr 15, 2002
2,535
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#12
http://www.amazon.com/Zojirushi-NS-Z...hi+rice+cooker

Is the one I got. I used to think these were such a waste of money but holy crap I love mine. It comes out perfect everytime and the warming function keeps the rice warm for hours on end without drying it out. I also like how I can schedule the rice to cook. I set mine to be ready at 7:00pm so that by the time I get home, I've got hot rice waiting for me.
This is what I have as well. Absolutely love it.
 
Apr 10, 2000
19,566
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#14
This is what I have as well. Absolutely love it.
Yeah if you look at previous rice cooker threads, I was a huge naysayer about these fancy rice cookers. Then I bought one and I'll never go back :D
 
Aug 10, 2002
5,864
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#15
I heard Zojirushi is an excellent yet expensive brand of rice cookers. They have lots of features that can be used for more than just cooking rice.
 

brainhulk

Diamond Member
Sep 14, 2007
8,816
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#16
they need to make a rice cooker that can also make fried rice
 

Zivic

Diamond Member
Nov 25, 2002
3,418
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#17
This is also my problem. I need the stove space.

And yes, I eat a lot of rice. I guess $150 is too much?

Edit: Saw the links to other cookers, maybe that's in the right ballpark.
I picked up this one for myself:
http://www.amazon.com/Zojirushi-NP-H...ords=Zojirushi

it is worth it IMHO... well, if it is still working 5 yrs down the road it will be.

if you are comfortable spending 150, it isn't too much.
 

waggy

No Lifer
Dec 14, 2000
68,155
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#18

mvbighead

Diamond Member
Apr 20, 2009
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#19
If you're just looking for "regular rice" all you need is:





Less than $10.

You don't need that contraption. Rice is so cheap and so simple. No need to complicate it.

http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-cook-rice-on-the-stove-44333
That method is going to give you spotty results, especially when you vary your rice types.

I have made quite a bit of rice over the last couple years, and I never get restaurant quality sticky rice, especially not with the 2:1 ratio. I'm to the point now that I am ready to try some method of steaming, whether an "actual" rice cooker or just some concoction to make it happen on the stove.

But boiling water and putting rice directly in the water does not give consistent, quality, restaurant style rice. For what it is worth, last night I cooked some Costco Organic Brown Rice, 2 cups rice, 4 cups water (per their instructions, they suggested 5 cups of water). A pinch of salt, and tsp of butter. I had about 1/2" of water in the bottom of the pan after 40 minutes, and I popped the lid off a couple times to let the steam out so it would be less watery. It was just clumpy, nasty looking rice. It tasted pretty blah as well. Not at all what I would consider good.

I am willing to bet that some method of steaming is going to produce far more consistent results as the water isn't soaking the rice.
 

waggy

No Lifer
Dec 14, 2000
68,155
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#21

Vic Vega

Diamond Member
Sep 24, 2010
4,537
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#23
That method is going to give you spotty results, especially when you vary your rice types.

I have made quite a bit of rice over the last couple years, and I never get restaurant quality sticky rice, especially not with the 2:1 ratio. I'm to the point now that I am ready to try some method of steaming, whether an "actual" rice cooker or just some concoction to make it happen on the stove.

But boiling water and putting rice directly in the water does not give consistent, quality, restaurant style rice. For what it is worth, last night I cooked some Costco Organic Brown Rice, 2 cups rice, 4 cups water (per their instructions, they suggested 5 cups of water). A pinch of salt, and tsp of butter. I had about 1/2" of water in the bottom of the pan after 40 minutes, and I popped the lid off a couple times to let the steam out so it would be less watery. It was just clumpy, nasty looking rice. It tasted pretty blah as well. Not at all what I would consider good.

I am willing to bet that some method of steaming is going to produce far more consistent results as the water isn't soaking the rice.
Inconsistent results? I've been cooking rice for 25 years, it's not hard at all. Heat, rice, water, fat, salt. That's it. Simple.

The method you quoted is not for cooking sticky rice. My first post was sticky rice, see that.
 

SheHateMe

Diamond Member
Jul 21, 2012
7,251
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#24
I like steamed rice, not boiled rice.

Thats why I use Rice cookers.


I suck at making Rice and I'm not afraid to admit it.
 
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