Baltimore’s Francis Scott Key Bridge collapsed after being hit by a cargo boat.

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hal2kilo

Lifer
Feb 24, 2009
23,560
10,427
136
As a person who grew up in Arlington, VA, it's weird that the only Key bridge I was aware of was the one going from Rosslyn to Foggie Bottom in DC. Never knew there was a Key bridge in Baltimore because we always used the tunnel.
Edit: the last bridge on the Potomac into DC is not far below the falls. It's Chain bridge. Key and Chain.
 
Last edited:
Nov 17, 2019
11,056
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Domino theory:

Baltimore bridge collapse has dockworkers in fear for their future

abcnews.go.com.ico
ABC|15 hours ago
The Port of Baltimore's shutdown has dealt a devastating blow to the economy, causing a staggering 8,000 jobs to be lost.
 

feralkid

Lifer
Jan 28, 2002
16,537
4,623
136
As a person who grew up in Arlington, VA, it's weird that the only Key bridge I was aware of was the one going from Rosslyn to Foggie Bottom in DC. Never knew there was a Key bridge in Baltimore because we always used the tunnel.
Edit: the last bridge on the Potomac into DC is not far below the falls. It's Chain bridge. Key and Chain.
Are there locks to get around the falls? ;)
 
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iRONic

Diamond Member
Jan 28, 2006
6,995
2,293
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iRONic

Diamond Member
Jan 28, 2006
6,995
2,293
136
I may have mis-named them. Is ‘Longshoreman’ the correct term for those guys that unload the container ships?

When these type of unforeseen catastrophic events happen it really amplifies the effect the supply chain has on our economy and society.
 

Zorba

Lifer
Oct 22, 1999
14,682
10,097
136
I may have mis-named them. Is ‘Longshoreman’ the correct term for those guys that unload the container ships?

When these type of unforeseen catastrophic events happen it really amplifies the effect the supply chain has on our economy and society.
Yes, they are Longshoremen.
 
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sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
95,451
15,377
126
MV Dali owner declares general average. Meaning the cost of the salvage will be spread to the customers as well. Let the lawsuits begin.

 
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feralkid

Lifer
Jan 28, 2002
16,537
4,623
136
MV Dali owner declares general average. Meaning the cost of the salvage will be spread to the customers as well. Let the lawsuits begin.


So...Weasels wrecked our bridge. It begins.
 
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FirNaTine

Senior member
Jun 6, 2005
634
180
116
I would think their union would be stepping up to help them. I believe there was a piece in some media about congress supplying part of their appropriations for the dockworkers.
Their union, ILA, is offering a supplemental benefit on top of state unemployment. But, it is still well below their normal pay. I don't know the exact amount though.
 
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skyking

Lifer
Nov 21, 2001
22,094
4,900
146
the video explains it well. It will slice it up so it frees the ship as best as possible, and nobody needs to be in harm's way making those final cuts that release energy.
 
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iRONic

Diamond Member
Jan 28, 2006
6,995
2,293
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Regardless of the human fuck ups and natures horrific weather effects on man and and our landscape it never ceases to amaze me the way that engineers can figure out ways to fix the shit!
 
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Pohemi

Diamond Member
Oct 2, 2004
9,068
11,831
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I'm impressed that even with how focused the precision directional charges are, that they don't consider the Dali's crew to be in any danger from it. It isn't the detonation that I would be concerned about but the movement of the truss as it splits. They obviously know wth they're doing though.
 

pcgeek11

Lifer
Jun 12, 2005
21,399
4,518
136
Shaped charges are remarkable. It is amazing how you can attach a shaped charge to a three inch piece of steel with a single piece of scotch tape and set it off. It will cut through the steel and not dislodge the charge housing from the plate.
 

trenchfoot

Lifer
Aug 5, 2000
14,584
7,033
136
Shaped charges are remarkable. It is amazing how you can attach a shaped charge to a three inch piece of steel with a single piece of scotch tape and set it off. It will cut through the steel and not dislodge the charge housing from the plate.


Back in the day we used 55 gal. drums that were modified as shaped charges for cratering jobs, especially as access denial on roads, runways and small bridges. We had to be a 1/4 mile away from the blast to stay clear of pressure wave and debris. Was one hell of a firecracker. Static electricity was a real concern when setting up the charges.
 

eelw

Diamond Member
Dec 4, 1999
9,170
4,459
136
I'm impressed that even with how focused the precision directional charges are, that they don't consider the Dali's crew to be in any danger from it. It isn't the detonation that I would be concerned about but the movement of the truss as it splits. They obviously know wth they're doing though.
Wait, they’ve remained on board this entire time o_O
 
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pcgeek11

Lifer
Jun 12, 2005
21,399
4,518
136
Back in the day we used 55 gal. drums that were modified as shaped charges for cratering jobs, especially as access denial on roads, runways and small bridges. We had to be a 1/4 mile away from the blast to stay clear of pressure wave and debris. Was one hell of a firecracker. Static electricity was a real concern when setting up the charges.

I've only been associated with the smaller charges used as demolition triggers for larger devices such as missile rocket motors and entry access cutting etc...
 
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skyking

Lifer
Nov 21, 2001
22,094
4,900
146
Depending on what you want to break, they can be incredibly violent and energetic.
"We had to be a 1/4 mile away from the blast to stay clear of pressure wave and debris."
We probably should have been a 1/4 mile away when they touched off a charge set on a boulder that had a missed charge while building Cowlitz Falls Dam.
1280px-Cowlitz_Falls_Prjt_8136.jpg

I was working swings. Day shift drilled all day and they blasted at shift change, generating about 3000 CY of rock that we moved out of the cut.
One day that had a big solid nugget that was out of the pattern, and rather than build a trail to get a drill to it, Kray Kray Coogan cooked up a shaped charge idea. Oh yeah. He was nuts.
We were above the cut in our yard where those young trees are on the right. CRACK!
Here comes this line drive head sized rock, traveling in a very flat arc. It bounced off the 3' diameter fender log <Bonk, splinters flying> and back down to the cut. Had it cleared the log it would have one-hopped through anything up there, conexs, equipment, us humans.