Are there any professions with as much vacation time as teachers?

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MikeMike

Lifer
Feb 6, 2000
45,885
66
91
Originally posted by: Triforceofcourage
Originally posted by: Zenmervolt
Originally posted by: Koenigsegg
I can't imagine life without summer vacation, spring break, or extended winter vacations..
You realise that teachers work 70-80 hours a week during school, right?

ZV
Thats such a general statement and sounds like BS.......
how? honestly i can see it. unless you work at a spot that has helpers and other things.

say you have 5 classes a day. and you have an in class assignment, and a homework due that day. you then have 2 papers to grade. with 26 ppl a class, time 2 times 5 you are at 260 items to grade. say that they take you one minute each, thats 4 hours. yes you have planning periods, but those are only maybe about an hour long, so now you have 3 more hours. and you work from 7:00-3:00 thats 8 hours, and then 3 more is 11 hours a day, dont forget planning tomorrow, making a test, looking up requirements if your an AP. meetings, and other things.

 

vegetation

Diamond Member
Feb 21, 2001
4,270
2
0
Professor. 9 month community college prof makes around 50k, doesn't take much brains. If you're more intellectual, you can aspire to be a Prof at a research university and average 60-70k for a 9 month schedule.
 

MrChad

Lifer
Aug 22, 2001
13,507
2
81
Originally posted by: Triforceofcourage
Originally posted by: Zenmervolt
Originally posted by: Koenigsegg
I can't imagine life without summer vacation, spring break, or extended winter vacations..
You realise that teachers work 70-80 hours a week during school, right?

ZV
Thats such a general statement and sounds like BS.......
My fiancee is a teacher and its definitely not BS. She has lesson plans to write and homework, classwork and tests to grade for over 90 students. This is in addition to after/before school tutoring and general administrative tasks.

The nice thing about a job without summer and winter breaks is that your work day ends when you come home.
 

Looney

Lifer
Jun 13, 2000
21,941
5
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Originally posted by: Triforceofcourage
Originally posted by: Zenmervolt
Originally posted by: Koenigsegg
I can't imagine life without summer vacation, spring break, or extended winter vacations..
You realise that teachers work 70-80 hours a week during school, right?

ZV
Thats such a general statement and sounds like BS.......
Then you have absolutely no idea how much time teachers spend on class preparation and marking.
 

boomerang

Lifer
Jun 19, 2000
18,890
641
126
Back to OP's question; Supreme Court justices have the summer off.

I'm real tired of hearing how rough teachers have it. They chose the profession, plain and simple. Why would they choose a job with supposed long hours and supposed little pay? Because they wanted the job.

I'm tired of hearing them whine and complain. I'm tired of the NEA saying that what they do is for the kids. BS.

 

Zenmervolt

Elite member
Oct 22, 2000
24,510
13
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Originally posted by: Triforceofcourage
Originally posted by: Zenmervolt
Originally posted by: Koenigsegg
I can't imagine life without summer vacation, spring break, or extended winter vacations..
You realise that teachers work 70-80 hours a week during school, right?

ZV
Thats such a general statement and sounds like BS.......
Believe it or don't. How many teachers did you grow up with in your family though?

My mother teaches. She goes in at 6:00am, gets home about 7:00pm, and then grades papers or works on developing new testing until 8:00 or 9:00. Usually puts in a couple hours on the weekends too.

You'll find that any half-decent teacher does much the same.

ZV
 

brunswickite

Diamond Member
Jul 23, 2002
6,386
1
0
Originally posted by: Looney
Originally posted by: Triforceofcourage
Originally posted by: Zenmervolt
Originally posted by: Koenigsegg
I can't imagine life without summer vacation, spring break, or extended winter vacations..
You realise that teachers work 70-80 hours a week during school, right?

ZV
Thats such a general statement and sounds like BS.......
Then you have absolutely no idea how much time teachers spend on class preparation and marking.

I am sure its hard for young teachers initially, but teachers teaching for a few years use the same leason plan every year.. potentially even the same stupid exams.

work day consists of 8:00 am - 4:00 pm, once you have a lesson plan its not much work outside of that..


 

0

Golden Member
Jul 22, 2003
1,270
0
0
Originally posted by: Koenigsegg
I can't imagine life without summer vacation, spring break, or extended winter vacations..

consultant.
 

Landroval

Platinum Member
Feb 5, 2005
2,275
0
0
Originally posted by: vegetation
Professor. 9 month community college prof makes around 50k, doesn't take much brains. If you're more intellectual, you can aspire to be a Prof at a research university and average 60-70k for a 9 month schedule.

Only if you work at a crappy college. Any good research university prof is going to be working their ass off to do research, service, as well as teching, committees, etc. Summer months it is expected you are doing major research. Now if you work at a crappy school maybe you can slide, but you won't be making as much money.
 

Looney

Lifer
Jun 13, 2000
21,941
5
0
Originally posted by: brunswickite
Originally posted by: Looney
Originally posted by: Triforceofcourage
Originally posted by: Zenmervolt
Originally posted by: Koenigsegg
I can't imagine life without summer vacation, spring break, or extended winter vacations..
You realise that teachers work 70-80 hours a week during school, right?

ZV
Thats such a general statement and sounds like BS.......
Then you have absolutely no idea how much time teachers spend on class preparation and marking.

I am sure its hard for young teachers initially, but teachers teaching for a few years use the same leason plan every year.. potentially even the same stupid exams.

work day consists of 8:00 am - 4:00 pm, once you have a lesson plan its not much work outside of that..
Well first, the curriculum do change. And preparation isn't just getting out the old stuff from last year the night before. It's in reviewing the material yourself, and possibly modifying it from what you've learned from last year. Teaching is more than just handing out assignments, it's also lecturing and demonstrations. It's reviewing the textbooks the students themselves will be using, as well as the teacher's version of the texts.

And all the hours of marking they need to do.

Yeah, i'm sure a veteran teacher who's been teaching for 10 years will have it easier, but that doesn't mean at 4pm their day ends.
 

shilala

Lifer
Oct 5, 2004
11,437
1
76
Pipefitter.
I seldom work more than six months a year. I've been off work for almost a year now.
It's fabulous.
I have an interview tomorrow, maybe it'll wreck my streak. :)
 

brunswickite

Diamond Member
Jul 23, 2002
6,386
1
0
Originally posted by: Looney
Originally posted by: brunswickite
Originally posted by: Looney
Originally posted by: Triforceofcourage
Originally posted by: Zenmervolt
Originally posted by: Koenigsegg
I can't imagine life without summer vacation, spring break, or extended winter vacations..
You realise that teachers work 70-80 hours a week during school, right?

ZV
Thats such a general statement and sounds like BS.......
Then you have absolutely no idea how much time teachers spend on class preparation and marking.

I am sure its hard for young teachers initially, but teachers teaching for a few years use the same leason plan every year.. potentially even the same stupid exams.

work day consists of 8:00 am - 4:00 pm, once you have a lesson plan its not much work outside of that..
Well first, the curriculum do change. And preparation isn't just getting out the old stuff from last year the night before. It's in reviewing the material yourself, and possibly modifying it from what you've learned from last year. Teaching is more than just handing out assignments, it's also lecturing and demonstrations. It's reviewing the textbooks the students themselves will be using, as well as the teacher's version of the texts.

And all the hours of marking they need to do.

Yeah, i'm sure a veteran teacher who's been teaching for 10 years will have it easier, but that doesn't mean at 4pm their day ends.

Maybe it was impression I got from the teachers in my Highschool, but most of them would come in at ~7:30-8:00am, and leave 15-20 minutes after the last period of the day(~3:00pm). As with the reviewing old matierial, and keeping up, most of what teachers teach is the same every year (math, history, english). They just go through that same lesson plan..

Gradeing exams/quizzes might take some time, but if they use MC or short answer exams, its pretty mindless. I even had lazy azz teachers that would just make us grade our own exams by switching with our neighbor and then going over the answers...


 

Pacfanweb

Lifer
Jan 2, 2000
13,148
57
91
Originally posted by: Looney
Originally posted by: brunswickite
Originally posted by: Looney
Originally posted by: Triforceofcourage
Originally posted by: Zenmervolt
Originally posted by: Koenigsegg
I can't imagine life without summer vacation, spring break, or extended winter vacations..
You realise that teachers work 70-80 hours a week during school, right?

ZV
Thats such a general statement and sounds like BS.......
Then you have absolutely no idea how much time teachers spend on class preparation and marking.

I am sure its hard for young teachers initially, but teachers teaching for a few years use the same leason plan every year.. potentially even the same stupid exams.

work day consists of 8:00 am - 4:00 pm, once you have a lesson plan its not much work outside of that..
Well first, the curriculum do change. And preparation isn't just getting out the old stuff from last year the night before. It's in reviewing the material yourself, and possibly modifying it from what you've learned from last year. Teaching is more than just handing out assignments, it's also lecturing and demonstrations. It's reviewing the textbooks the students themselves will be using, as well as the teacher's version of the texts.

And all the hours of marking they need to do.

Yeah, i'm sure a veteran teacher who's been teaching for 10 years will have it easier, but that doesn't mean at 4pm their day ends.
Depends on what they are teaching. Both of my ex in-laws were teachers for over 30 years. The father in law was a PE teacher, and got off when the school bell rang every day. Played golf nearly every day after school.
When he was younger, he was a pretty high-profile basketball coach, asst. football coach, and golf coach. He worked a lot more then, but got paid for it.

The mom was a math teacher. She worked until around 5 at the latest. She had her lesson plans for most of the year down, so her main work was grading papers, and if you are an efficient person, you don't need to stay until 7 pm to grade papers....unless you are dumb enough to have every single class you teach have tests on the same day.

Maybe when teachers are young, they need to work many hours, but I could care less about the river they cry when they say they work 70hr weeks during school.
I'll bet my house that they don't do it every week, and they still get all the vacations and breaks, too.
Lots of people work that much all year around, for similar pay.

Teaching degrees are some of the easiest ones to get, and all the graduates know exactly what they are in for, pay-wise, before they ever start.

Making 50k per year for how much teachers work is plenty of money.
 

GeekDrew

Diamond Member
Jun 7, 2000
9,100
13
81
Originally posted by: Looney
I've been seriously entertaining becoming a school counselor.
Do school counselors not work year-round where you are? They do here.

I just left an IT position at a public high school. It's not hard to see who the better teachers are - most of the time - in regards to quality, both in the opinions of the students and of administration. Those teachers are usually the ones that come in early, and leave late. They spend the extra time it takes to make sure the students understand things, they pay attention when they are grading things, etc.

Some teachers have it harder than others. Some of the teachers in one of the high schools I worked in would leave the second that the bells rang (well... tones were sounded) for staff dismissal, and they were just fine as teachers. Others put in extreme hours - it depends what you teach, the quality of your students, etc. My mom only has 30 students a day - that's in two classes. She works 7:30 AM - 5:00 PM most days. Then she grades stuff after she gets home. She's *always* doing something for school. It's her life. And yes, in her case, it IS for the kids. Until recently, they could have easily lived off of dad's salary, but she kept her job because she likes it (likes helping kids).

As for pay, the teachers in the districts I've worked in receive pay for all 12 months - their salary calculation is based on a divisor of 12, not of 9. If administration needs them to come in for a day to work in the summer for some reason, then they are granted an extra day's stipend for doing so (I know that's true in at least 3 districts here in central Ohio).

<sigh>

We've been over this before, people.
 

Landroval

Platinum Member
Feb 5, 2005
2,275
0
0
Work for the federal government. Some people take "vacation" all year round and are near impossible to fire.
 

Koenigsegg

Banned
Jun 29, 2005
2,267
1
0
Originally posted by: Landroval
Work for the federal government. Some people take "vacation" all year round and are near impossible to fire.
That's typical of most gov't jobs..
 

mugs

Lifer
Apr 29, 2003
48,903
19
81
Originally posted by: Zenmervolt
Originally posted by: Triforceofcourage
Originally posted by: Zenmervolt
Originally posted by: Koenigsegg
I can't imagine life without summer vacation, spring break, or extended winter vacations..
You realise that teachers work 70-80 hours a week during school, right?

ZV
Thats such a general statement and sounds like BS.......
Believe it or don't. How many teachers did you grow up with in your family though?

My mother teaches. She goes in at 6:00am, gets home about 7:00pm, and then grades papers or works on developing new testing until 8:00 or 9:00. Usually puts in a couple hours on the weekends too.

You'll find that any half-decent teacher does much the same.

ZV
My mother is a teacher as well (and at very least a half-decent one), she doesn't work nearly those hours. That would be an additional 2 hours before school and 4 hours after, plus most teachers have prep periods, and still spending time working at home? Maybe she's just slow, or she has a really long commute that you're including in her working hours...

But regardless, you realize anectdotes prove nothing, right? I doubt an average teacher works 70-80 hours a week.
 

BlueWeasel

Lifer
Jun 2, 2000
15,929
448
126
Originally posted by: Pacfanweb
Depends on what they are teaching. Both of my ex in-laws were teachers for over 30 years. The father in law was a PE teacher, and got off when the school bell rang every day. Played golf nearly every day after school.
When he was younger, he was a pretty high-profile basketball coach, asst. football coach, and golf coach. He worked a lot more then, but got paid for it.

The mom was a math teacher. She worked until around 5 at the latest. She had her lesson plans for most of the year down, so her main work was grading papers, and if you are an efficient person, you don't need to stay until 7 pm to grade papers....unless you are dumb enough to have every single class you teach have tests on the same day.

Maybe when teachers are young, they need to work many hours, but I could care less about the river they cry when they say they work 70hr weeks during school.
I'll bet my house that they don't do it every week, and they still get all the vacations and breaks, too.
Lots of people work that much all year around, for similar pay.

Teaching degrees are some of the easiest ones to get, and all the graduates know exactly what they are in for, pay-wise, before they ever start.

Making 50k per year for how much teachers work is plenty of money.
Based on my ex-roommate, who is a teach and coach, I agree completely. He's the most worthless person I know, and most of the coaches who teach are the same way.

A few examples:
1) Is about 15 minutes late to his first class because he's outside chatting with the other coaches
2) Typical day during off-season was usually 8:00am to 1:30pm
3) If he's hung over, he'd give a quiz or make the kids watch a video.
4) He'd get paid extra (hourly rate) during the summer for maintenance..yet him and all the other coaches would take 2-hour lunches and quit early to go play golf. But, he reported 40 hours every week.

And yet he gets rewarded for this. He just switched school districts, and they are going to pay for his Masters degree. He doesn't have to teach a class...just go to school and coach.

And yet he thinks he doesn't get paid enough. For all the hardworking teachers out there who actually care, I'm all for a pay raise. But those like my ex-roommate need their ass shown to the door.
 

Tommunist

Golden Member
Dec 1, 2004
1,544
0
0
Originally posted by: Koenigsegg
I can't imagine life without summer vacation, spring break, or extended winter vacations..
make note that most GOOD teachers work many more than 40 hours a week during the school year. weekends are often spent correcting/grading.
 

mugs

Lifer
Apr 29, 2003
48,903
19
81
Originally posted by: rbloedow
Originally posted by: spacejamz
Originally posted by: Koenigsegg
I can't imagine life without summer vacation, spring break, or extended winter vacations..
If you can be happy with the national average salary of $47k a year, you are all set...
just depends on where you live: @ 47K, you're making some good sh!t around here.
$47k is a great starting salary, but it takes years to hit that point as a teacher. I don't think you'll find many teachers who think they're making the big bucks.

A lot of the seasonal workers in the beach towns around here are teachers - lifeguards, waiters, bartenders, etc. With a job like that to supplement teaching income, I suppose you'd be doing alright.
 

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