Anyone on DVORAK keyboard format?

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BurnItDwn

Lifer
Oct 10, 1999
26,089
1,570
126
I use Dvorak on 3 of my PCs and my PC at work.

It took a couple months to get used to it, but I can type a bit faster now. I think it's much more comfortable to type on a dvorak keyboard as i dont have to move my hand positions very much at all.


I try to avoid qwerty , however, sometimes on my laptop I will leave it in qwerty mode. Also if I'm not on my PC at work I will use whatever format it's on.




EDIT: I exclusivly use IBM Model M keyboards right now, its VERY easy to rearrange the keys on these ... takes less than 10 minutes to do it.
 

Confused

Elite Member
Nov 13, 2000
14,166
0
0
Dvorak is the faster way, but way back when they had manual typewriters, they did a test between qwerty and dvorak, and dvorak was faster, but they kept jamming up the typewriter because they were going too fast for the mechanism to keep up!

Another side note, they are callad a typewriter because all of those keys are on the top row of a qwerty keyboard, so salesmen could easily demonstrate to customers how quick it was, without having to move their fingers too quickly ;)


Confused
 

0roo0roo

No Lifer
Sep 21, 2002
64,862
84
91
no need to scramble your brain, unless u never plan to use other kb ever again. i mean really, how much do you have to type. do you really think that much faster then your type? you write code so fast you can't keep up? unless your just sitting there copying sh*t like a monkey, i don't see it as that much more efficient.
 

Gurck

Banned
Mar 16, 2004
12,963
1
0
I type 90-100 wpm on qwerty, that's faster (and far, far neater) than I can write and plenty good enough for me. After all these years I doubt I could get used to Dvorak, after googling a few pics. I use a split keyboard and so will probably avoid rsi/carpal
 

3chordcharlie

Diamond Member
Mar 30, 2004
9,859
1
81
I'm not overly great with qwerty but I can usually type as fast as I can compose, so it would only be a problem typing copy, whihc I never do.

I think I'd be screwed if I rearranged the keys and didn't have the little knobs for F and J anymore; I'd get lost pretty fast!
 

rainypickles

Senior member
Dec 7, 2001
724
0
0
as BingBongWongFooey has mentioned, Dvorak is not all about typing faster even though the fastest typist in the world uses it. the other half is about comfort. many keys are on the home row and thus you have to move your fingers less to type common words like the and this. you can type "this is the sh!t" with only the home row, with the i, of course, not the !. after typing with dvorak, going to qwerty keyboards to type is noticably more difficult. i'm not sure i would use the word painful, but definitely more difficult.

the first few weeks you learn dvorak, it will be hard to switch between dvorak and qwerty. after you use dvorak exclusively and learn it, going back to qwerty will take a little bit to remind your brain. i can go to qwerty keyboards and use them easily. (been using dvorak for 6+ years now)

i would suggest that EVERYONE learn dvorak and convert, but it doesnt seem it will happen because all keyboards are qwerty. this is like the english system vs the metric system. dvorak/metric is superior, but english/qwerty is too far in place to be moved. learn dvorak! save the future! i wish there were a way to teach kids only dvorak.

dvorak "typing course"
 

yukichigai

Diamond Member
Apr 23, 2003
6,404
0
0
Originally posted by: sm8000
Originally posted by: yukichigai
I have never heard of this before. I once saw some infomercials for a keyboard arranged alphabetically(sp?) but never DVORAK. Linkage?

Dvorak
Ah. I thought DVORAK indicated the order of the top row of keys. Guess it's named after someone then.

Seems more logical if you think about it. The current QWERTY system was invented back in the days of typewriters specifically to curb typing speed, as typists were typing too fast for the machinery to handle.
 

Gurck

Banned
Mar 16, 2004
12,963
1
0
Originally posted by: rainypickles
as BingBongWongFooey has mentioned, Dvorak is not all about typing faster even though the fastest typist in the world uses it. the other half is about comfort. many keys are on the home row and thus you have to move your fingers less to type common words like the and this. you can type "this is the sh!t" with only the home row, with the i, of course, not the !. after typing with dvorak, going to qwerty keyboards to type is noticably more difficult. i'm not sure i would use the word painful, but definitely more difficult.

the first few weeks you learn dvorak, it will be hard to switch between dvorak and qwerty. after you use dvorak exclusively and learn it, going back to qwerty will take a little bit to remind your brain. i can go to qwerty keyboards and use them easily. (been using dvorak for 6+ years now)

i would suggest that EVERYONE learn dvorak and convert, but it doesnt seem it will happen because all keyboards are qwerty. this is like the english system vs the metric system. dvorak/metric is superior, but english/qwerty is too far in place to be moved. learn dvorak! save the future! i wish there were a way to teach kids only dvorak.

dvorak "typing course"

Well... I didn't plan on it but now I think I might, thanks for the links
 

Kenazo

Lifer
Sep 15, 2000
10,429
1
81
Originally posted by: yukichigai
Originally posted by: sm8000
Originally posted by: yukichigai
I have never heard of this before. I once saw some infomercials for a keyboard arranged alphabetically(sp?) but never DVORAK. Linkage?

Dvorak
Ah. I thought DVORAK indicated the order of the top row of keys. Guess it's named after someone then.

Seems more logical if you think about it. The current QWERTY system was invented back in the days of typewriters specifically to curb typing speed, as typists were typing too fast for the machinery to handle.


It wasn't made to slow typists down, just to make sure there was room between the most commonly used letters. Otherwise when the hammers flew into the paper there would be two getting there at the same time, thus jamming it.
 

raptor13

Golden Member
Oct 9, 1999
1,719
0
0
I switched over to Dvorak about 2.5 years ago and have never looked back. I was a pretty good typist in QWERTY before making the switch (I could do ~70wpm) but I can regularly hit 100wpm with Dvorak. It is faster. It is more comfortable. It takes some time to learn. :D

If you want to make the switch, do it all at once and stick to it. Do not allow yourself to type in QWERTY while you're still learning... that'll mess you way up. It sucks at the beginning because you'll be slow in Dvorak and slow in QWERTY but once Dvorak picks up, you'll be happy. I'm pretty much bilingual now and can get about 50wpm in QWERTY. That's good enough for me.

I never bothered to rearrange the keys on my board. What's the point? You should be touch-typing anyway. I have Windows set up so I can use hotkeys to switch between Dvorak and QWERTY so it's simple if anyone else has to use my computer. You can also set that up in about 10 seconds on any Windows machine so you can easily use Dvorak at work, school, wherever.

It's also great when someone else jumps on your computer for some reason. They're like, "Dude, what the hell is wrong with this thing?" and then you jump on, fire off a bunch of words, and say, "Nothing. What the hell is wrong with you?" Good stuff. :D
 

raptor13

Golden Member
Oct 9, 1999
1,719
0
0
Everyone should check out TypingTest.com to see how you really measure. I'd bet a lot of you type slower and/or less accurately than you think you do.


Just for measurements sake, I just kicked out 108wpm in 1 minute with the Huckleberry Finn text. :cool:
 

Originally posted by: Confused
Dvorak is the faster way, but way back when they had manual typewriters, they did a test between qwerty and dvorak, and dvorak was faster, but they kept jamming up the typewriter because they were going too fast for the mechanism to keep up!

Another side note, they are callad a typewriter because all of those keys are on the top row of a qwerty keyboard, so salesmen could easily demonstrate to customers how quick it was, without having to move their fingers too quickly ;)


Confused
Actually I believe that QWERTY was used because having the most commonly used letters right next to each other jammed the machine, not the speed of the typist.