AHHHHH!!!! STUPID F***ING PIECE OF SH*T!!!

iamtrout

Diamond Member
Nov 21, 2001
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It all started with an upgrade. A simple processor upgrade. I got an XP 2200+ from Ebay, replaced my old 1.3GHz with that, turned on the computer, and my motherboard exploded, sounding like a firecracker and launching pieces of capacitor into my face! AHH!!!

The processor was dead. The mobo was dead.

Now $80 in the hole (thankfully got a refund from ebay guy), I ordered a Shuttle AN35N Ultra and another 2200+, this time from newegg.

Installed everything. Put on my water cooling setup. Ran it for a few hours making sure there were no leaks and wet spots. Turn on the computer. BIOS. YES!! Check system temps. CPU @ 32C. YES!! Insert WINXP and tell to boot from CD-ROM. Gets past "Verifying DMA Pool Data" and screen blanks. And computer shuts off.

Reset CMOS. Computer fans start to spin up, but then everything turns off after a second. Cool little RED light on mobo is lit. Look in manual, discover that light means my CPU has overheated. It turns on only if CPU is over 85C. 85C! F*CK!! AHHH!

Take off my water block. No leak. No smell. No dark mark on CPU. Put everything back together and system still does same thing. RED LED goes on the second I turn on the power.

What the hell is wrong with me?? I've built 20 some computers! My system has been down for a month because of lack of CPU and mobo! ARRGGGG!!!!!
 

thraxes

Golden Member
Nov 4, 2000
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well at least you weren't as dumb as the guy a few places down from me at my last LAN party... sucka forgot to turn on his water pump and his 2500 barton just fizzeled away accompanied by remarkable sound FX by its owner :)

Are you sure your PSU isn't sending too many volts over the rails? It sure sounds like it since you have destroyed 2 boards and CPUs in one sitting.
It could also just be bad luck. 8 years ago I had to trade in my new P75 three times before I got one that actually worked right!
 

Ketchup

Elite Member
Sep 1, 2002
14,545
236
106
Originally posted by: iamtrout

Installed everything. Put on my water cooling setup. Ran it for a few hours making sure there were no leaks and wet spots.

Might be a good idea to check a water cooling setup for leaks BEFORE you install it in your system. Just a thought.
 

iamtrout

Diamond Member
Nov 21, 2001
3,001
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I've been using this water cooling setup for two years now. It's never leaked on me before. I've always made sure that all of the clamps are nice and tight and give every joint a wipe with a paper towel. As for the PS, it's the same one I've been using for two years. Antec 400 watter. I hope that it's just bad luck. Gonna call AMD and try to get a replacement. If this third one gets screwed, then I probably will end up going with Intel for sanity's sake.
 

iamtrout

Diamond Member
Nov 21, 2001
3,001
1
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Yeah, it's probably me. WAHH!! Or bad luck. Seriously, I don't think I've been doing anything different from what I've always done. Hehe, check out the new sig.
 

Insane3D

Elite Member
May 24, 2000
19,446
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Here's a suggestion. I'm not sure what the status of your bad parts are, but maybe you should try a different motherboard manufacturer and get a cheaper CPU like the 1700+ Tbred B. You could get a new Epox 8RDA+ and a 1700+ that will do @ least 2Ghz, more likely 2.4ish, and it will cost you roughly $120. Sell the shuttle mobo, or RMA it to recoup some money.

Just an idea..


One more thing...why watercooling? You can get a quiet HSF for not a lot of money that will do the job fine.
 

Tab

Lifer
Sep 15, 2002
12,145
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Agreed, this has nothing to do with Intel vs. AMD. Personally, you should ditch that mobo and get some real air cooling!
 

mechBgon

Super Moderator<br>Elite Member
Oct 31, 1999
30,699
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If all that happened was that your CPU overheated and tripped the thermal-shutdown circuitry, I fail to see where the histrionics are warranted here. :) It's not likely to be damaged from one or two incidents, although if you keep on trying and trying, well, you might manage to kill it through sheer persistence.

Test it with a SocketA heatsink/fan unit, and make sure to orient the heatsink in the correct direction (stepped end of heatsink facing the power supply, on your Shuttle).

If that brings it to life, then it tells you that your waterblock has not been making square contact with the CPU core, possibly for the reason illustrated in figure 14 of this guide, or perhaps due to lack of adequate clamping force to compress the CPU's cornerpads. I don't know if the underside of your waterblock is asymmetrical or not, but the clip should be... its pressure point must be over the CPU core, and the underside of the waterblock should not touch ANYTHING but the core and the cornerpads.

Hope that helps you out :)
 

drag

Elite Member
Jul 4, 2002
8,708
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Make sure that your pump is still pumping and the cpu is getting the correct voltage. Shear physics say that if the heat sink worked for one cpu it'll work for the other. Unless it's a badly designed one that barely kept the old slower cpu cool.

Make sure that the pump is actually pumping and not just making noise. The impeller could be broken or a hose pinched.

Unless you used anti-freeze or some other electrolite cancelling solvent in your cooling fluid you could have a clogged heatsink. The moving water is a good enough path for electricity that if you have a dissimilar metals in the system (say copper heatsink and aluminum radiator) you will create the same effect as a extremely low voltage battery. The aluminum oxides very quickly (thats how it gets strong... aluminum is very shiny, but as soon as it touches oxygen (like in air) it oxides to a dull finish that is strong, any scratches and gouges are filled partially with alumimum oxide expanding as it oxides and protects the underlining metal) If a slight charge is present the aluminum will begin to flake off as it rots and will be deposited on the copper of your heatsink thus completing the electronic exchange. In cars with much more water and heat this is accentuated with iron engine blocks and alumimum cylender heads. You will actually rot away the alumimum and it will cause weakening of the walls and cracks (causes leaks in aluminum radiators too) can form if you don't use the proper blend of anti-freeze.
 

AtomicDude512

Golden Member
Feb 10, 2003
1,067
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Originally posted by: Budman
time to go Intel. :D

People often make the very bad assumption that Intel is all powerful, stable and will make anything work. This is incorrect in my opinion. If you choose the right hardware from the right manufacturers your system will be very stable and work fine, AMD...or Intel (had to put that in so as not to break the AMD vs. Intel rule ;)). I have a MSI KT3 Ultra and an AMD XP 1700 and the thing runs stable as a rock almost 24/7.

You just need the right stuff, next time buy a MSI, Asus or ABit motherboard based off of the nForce2 chipset and you should be fine.
 

XMan

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
12,513
49
91
Stupid question . . . is the AK35N one of those boards that shuts down if it doesn't detect a fan plugged into the CPU fan header?
 

mechBgon

Super Moderator<br>Elite Member
Oct 31, 1999
30,699
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Originally posted by: X-Man
Stupid question . . . is the AK35N one of those boards that shuts down if it doesn't detect a fan plugged into the CPU fan header?
You meant AN35N, but that's a solid suggestion. I had a look at the manual, and the language seems to indicate that this board will run without an RPM signal.
The AMD AthlonXP/Athlon/Duron processor requires a set of heatsink/fan
to ensure proper cooling of the processor. If heatsink/fan have not been already
mounted on your CPU, you must purchase the heatsink/fan separately
and have it installed. Plug the cable throught the heatsink/fan in the CPU fan
power connector located nearby. Note that there are several types of CPU
fan connectors. Normally, if your mainboard supports the hardware monitoring
function, a 3-pin fan power connector should allow your system to
detect the CPU fan's speed. The CPU fan can also run with a 2-pin fan power
connector, however, detection of CPU fan's speed is not supported. Another
type of CPU fan may feature a large 4-pin fan power connector, which
does not support CPU fan's speed detection and must be directly connected
to the system's power supply unit.
 

Boobers

Senior member
Jun 28, 2001
799
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0
I've seen boards do this before. Turn on, spin up fans, then shut off. It has to do with the CPU fan RPM signal. It doesn't matter how the BIOS is set, sometimes it takes a high RPM fan signal to start the board. I know this sounds unbelievable (I wouldn't believe it myself, if it hadn't happened to me), but is easy to check quickly. Plug in a 60mm fan (They usually spin faster then th 80's) and see what happens...YMMV
 

Cerb

Elite Member
Aug 26, 2000
17,484
33
86
Originally posted by: Boobers
I've seen boards do this before. Turn on, spin up fans, then shut off. It has to do with the CPU fan RPM signal. It doesn't matter how the BIOS is set, sometimes it takes a high RPM fan signal to start the board. I know this sounds unbelievable (I wouldn't believe it myself, if it hadn't happened to me), but is easy to check quickly. Plug in a 60mm fan (They usually spin faster then th 80's) and see what happens...YMMV

Could be...try the setup w/o water. The cheapo $10 coolermaster HSF should get it to boot up.