Why do some things say NOT to use rechargeable batteries???

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by MWink, Nov 28, 2001.

  1. MWink

    MWink Diamond Member

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    I have read this about various things for quite a while (a long while) and it just doesn't make sense to me. I use rechargeables in everything, even some things that say not to and never had a single problem. The reason I bring this up is I was wandering around Nintendo's site (because I'm getting a Gameboy Advance for christmas) and came across this in the FAQ:

    "Can I use rechargeable batteries with my Game Boy?
    The only type of rechargeable batteries Nintendo recommends are Rayovac Renewals, but ONLY for the Game Boy Advance, Game Boy Color, Game Boy pocket, Game Boy Printer, and the built-in rumble device on Game Boy Game Paks. It is not recommended for use with the original Game Boy.

    Nintendo recommends against using most types of rechargeable batteries, because it's difficult to determine whether the batteries being used are all equally charged."

    This really makes no sense to me as I have seen plenty of Alkaline batteries die one faster than the other. The only legit concern I could possibly see is the fact that rechargeables are 1.2 volt instead of 1.5 volt. My original Gameboy and Gameboy Pocket were used with rechargeable NICD/NIMH batteries all their lives. The part that is even more strange is the fact they sell rechargeable batteries for these systems. I recently tore apart an old rechargeable battery pack for the original Gameboy and what did I find but 4 AA NICD batteries! I think these companies are full of BS. Something tells me the big battery companies pay these companies to say you can't use rechargeables as they take away from business.

    So anyone care to give me a valid reason why I should not use rechargeables in some devices???
     
  2. Thegonagle

    Thegonagle Diamond Member

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    Legit reasons: Because of voltage, capacity, and self discharge rate. It?s a ?Use rechargeables at your own peril? type of warning.

    Why not try them and see how well they work? I think they?d be fine in a Gameboy. I think Nintendo just wants an excuse to blow off whiny children calling their 800 number when they compain that short battery life made thm lose a game.

    Low drain devices, like smoke detectors, clocks, and remotes, or devices you rarely use, but always want at the ready, like a weather radio or a flashlight should always use alkalines. The self-discharge rate of rechargeables becomes a factor.
     
  3. JonnyDuke

    JonnyDuke Senior member

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    A validreason? No... not really. Simply because anymore most of the electronic devices have current and voltage regulating cicuitry
    built into them. There was a time, oh say 10-15 years ago, when the reason for not using rechargables was because they deliver that
    lower voltage at a much higher amperage than an alkaline cell. Therefor if you used NiCd's in a sensitive device it might damage it simply
    because the batteries could deliver more current than the device could handle. You might not WANT to use them in some things because
    they tend to die out rather quickly when the get down to about 30 % charge. At least in the case of the NiCd. The NiMH ones seem to hold
    out better.
     
  4. Mday

    Mday Lifer

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    some of the HP cameras overheat when you use niMH batteries.
     
  5. samarth

    samarth Senior member

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    JonnyDuke is correct
    Because of low voltage and high current. The high current can hurt some sensitive devices.
     
  6. MWink

    MWink Diamond Member

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    << The high current can hurt some sensitive devices. >>



    I kind of knew about that already. I have zapped myself real good a few times with rechargeable batteries. Who knew 3 volts could do so much damage. :Q (Then again, it's not the voltage, it's the amperage)
     
  7. Bozz

    Bozz Senior member

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    <<

    << The high current can hurt some sensitive devices. >>



    I kind of knew about that already. I have zapped myself real good a few times with rechargeable batteries. Who knew 3 volts could do so much damage. :Q (Then again, it's not the voltage, it's the amperage)
    >>



    LOL, please explain how the 3 volts zapped you!!! I also never knew that series'ing up 1.25v rechargeable batteries could make 3v :)



    << The high current can hurt some sensitive devices. >>



    You're on the right track - Most devices that use batteries rely on a certain voltage from the batteries and the battery should be able to supply enough current. The amount of current the battery can supply is related to its internal resistance, an alkaline cell has a higher internal resistance than a NiCd or NiMH cell so the alkaline can supply less current. Get an ammeter on a good alkaline cell when its brand new and test it for a split second, you will see it will deliver around 5-6 amps. Doing that with a NiCd battery shows it will deliver around 20 or more amps. Many electronic devices are poorly engineered without sufficient safety in the event of internal short circuit or failure, as a result NiCd or NiMH cells will deliver enormous amounts of energy quite possibly risking the device melting down or a fire starting in the event of malfunction.

    However for normal use, most devices that warn you not to use rechargeables will work fine if they can cope with the 0.25v lower voltage each NiCd or NiMH cell has.

    Alkalines and dry cells: 1.5v
    NiCd and NiMH: 1.25v (some say 1.24v but for debates sake!)
    LiIon and SLA and lead acid: 2v


    Cheers
     
  8. bunker

    bunker Lifer

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    FYI, I've been using energizer rechargeable NiCd's in my GBA for about 4 months now and have not had a problem.
     
  9. MWink

    MWink Diamond Member

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    << LOL, please explain how the 3 volts zapped you!!! I also never knew that series'ing up 1.25v rechargeable batteries could make 3v >>



    :p So it was 2.5 volts.


    My question still remains. Why do they say not to use them and then they go and sell rechargeable battery packs for it??? :confused:
     
  10. Mungla

    Mungla Senior member

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    I use 1600mah NIMH batteries in my Rio500. There is nothing like doubling how many hours of music I can play, per battery.

    I've been using the Rio with NIMH's for well over a year, almost everyday out of the week, for 2hrs per day.
     
  11. MWink

    MWink Diamond Member

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    I just remembered, I had this RC car that required rechargeable batteries. It said it like 15 times in the manual and all over the battery compartment. "USE ONLY NICD BATTERIES!" I thought it was kind of funny. And boy could that thing suck down batteries! :Q

    Come to think of it, that car may be worth something some day. It has stickers with the names of computer companies all over it. (Some of which don't even exist anymore). It is a CompUSA (or CompUSSR as some of you call it) car.
     
  12. Jfur

    Jfur Diamond Member

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    A decade ago, my pager company told me to only use Duracell because Energizer would not work/destroy the pager :confused: