which sentence is correct?

ElFenix

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Mar 20, 2000
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While the economy recently has changed

While the economy has changed recently


adverbs of time are usually placed at the beginning or end of a clause. so the last is more common.

breaking up the verb phrase, 'has changed,' with an adverb is frowned upon, iirc.


if you didn't want to emphasize the time, you'd go with something like, 'Recently the economy has changed, however,....'

that deemphasizes the time and provides a signal to the reader that you're changing directions at the direction change.
 

imported_Imp

Diamond Member
Dec 20, 2005
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While recently, the economy has changed, but I still buy hookers.

While the economy has recently changed, I still buy hookers.

Grammatically, they are both right I think, but the first one is VERY awkward sounding.
 

BeauJangles

Lifer
Aug 26, 2001
13,941
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Originally posted by: Dear Summer
While recently the economy has changed

While the economy has recently changed

both?

It'd probably be best to leave the recently out because it's awkward in both cases, but it depends on the rest of your sentence.
 

moshquerade

No Lifer
Nov 1, 2001
61,713
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Originally posted by: Dear Summer
While recently the economy has changed

While the economy has recently changed

both?

The second one sounds better to me, but they both seem correct.
 

GasX

Lifer
Feb 8, 2001
29,033
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81
Please provide the rest of the sentence so I can comment on your use of "while" which I think may not be the best word choice for what you are trying to say.
 

hanoverphist

Diamond Member
Dec 7, 2006
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Originally posted by: Imp
While recently, the economy has changed, but I still buy hookers.

While the economy has recently changed, I still buy hookers.

Grammatically, they are both right I think, but the first one is VERY awkward sounding.

with the recent economy changes, i still buy hookers and pills.


either way, in the OP the sentence is incomplete.
 

Gooberlx2

Lifer
May 4, 2001
15,381
6
91
Originally posted by: akubi

While the economy has changed recently

I'm guessing this is correct, and ELFenix explained why. However, the OP's second feels the least awkard (to me) when spoken.
 

PlasmaBomb

Lifer
Nov 19, 2004
11,815
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Originally posted by: Imp
While recently, the economy has changed, but I still buy hookers.

While the economy has recently changed, I still buy hookers.

Grammatically, they are both right I think, but the first one is VERY awkward sounding.

The first example is wrong... it reads while recently, but I still buy hookers.

Two commas can be used to set off additional information that appears within the sentence but is separate from the primary subject and verb of the sentence. These commas help your reader figure out your main point by telling him or her that the words within the commas are not necessary to understand the rest of the sentence. In other words, you should be able to take out the section framed by commas and still have a complete and clear sentence.
 

dullard

Elite Member
May 21, 2001
25,054
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Unless you are writing a law document, break that up into two sentences. It sounds to me like you will create a run-on sentence.

Instead of this:

1) While the economy has changed recently, I still will not live with my mother.

Try this:

2) The economy has degraded recently. However, I still will not live with my mother.

Example #1 is correct, but it isn't as clear as it could be. Example #2 gives more information, is easier to read and write properly, and it has no chance of being a run-on sentence.
 

ElFenix

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Mar 20, 2000
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Originally posted by: dullard
Unless you are writing a law document, break that up into two sentences. It sounds to me like you will create a run-on sentence.

Instead of this:

1) While the economy has changed recently, I still will not live with my mother.

Try this:

2) The economy has degraded recently. However, I still will not live with my mother.

Example #1 is correct, but it isn't as clear as it could be. Example #2 gives more information, is easier to read and write properly, and it has no chance of being a run-on sentence.

even when writing law documents it's best to break it up. long sentences do not get the point across as well as a few short sentences.
 

Agentbolt

Diamond Member
Jul 9, 2004
3,340
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Technically #2 is incorrect. It's similar to a split infinitive (To boldly go) in that you're breaking up the verb construction with an adverb, which is usually bad.

HOWEVER, "popular usage" is starting to do away with that as a hard and fast rule. In this case you're probably okay either way.
 

pstylesss

Platinum Member
Mar 21, 2007
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Originally posted by: Imp
While recently, the economy has changed, but I still buy hookers.

While the economy has recently changed, I still buy hookers.

Grammatically, they are both right I think, but the first one is VERY awkward sounding.

You're comma, happy and in, all the wrong, places.