Which religion has the most active Terrorists

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LunarRay

Diamond Member
Mar 2, 2003
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Originally posted by: dahunan
?
A couple of African nations have millions dead.. not all from combat but, I'd venture hundreds of thousands of non combatants died..
I'm not sure of the religion though.. which is the question, no?
Not sure they have a religion per se... maybe they do..

 

ConantheBarbarian

Senior member
Nov 8, 2000
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Originally posted by: Crazyfool
The cult of Islam started approximately 1400-1500 years ago is the religion of choice for terrorists.

What's really great about it is that the followers are stupid and gullible enough to believe there are 69 virgins waiting for them after some smelly bearded dude tells them to kill themselves in a manner that no legitimate religion could endorse. Man, I've heard of some hard-up dudes, but dang.
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dnoyeb

Senior member
Nov 7, 2001
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Oxymoronic question. One can not be both religious and a terrorist. At least not in Judeo-Christian religions (which includes Islam).
 

dnoyeb

Senior member
Nov 7, 2001
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Originally posted by: HJD1
Originally posted by: dahunan
?
A couple of African nations have millions dead.. not all from combat but, I'd venture hundreds of thousands of non combatants died..
I'm not sure of the religion though.. which is the question, no?
Not sure they have a religion per se... maybe they do..


Africans no religion? Sounds about like what the first European visitors to Africa said...Were you meaning to imply they had no popularly classified religion? I have never heard of an African Athiest. Maybe I missed your meaning!?
 

LunarRay

Diamond Member
Mar 2, 2003
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My meaning is I have no knowledge of African culture save the north African area. I am sure they have a belief system and I know there were missionaries sent to Africa from many organizations... I just don't know if: there are terrorist activity amongst the folks there and what the name is or if it is "a religion" as I might know it.
 

konichiwa

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
15,077
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Originally posted by: Crazyfool
The cult of Islam started approximately 1400-1500 years ago is the religion of choice for terrorists.

What's really great about it is that the followers are stupid and gullible enough to believe there are 69 virgins waiting for them after some smelly bearded dude tells them to kill themselves in a manner that no legitimate religion could endorse. Man, I've heard of some hard-up dudes, but dang.
Pat Buchannan? Is that you?
 

etech

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
10,597
0
0
Originally posted by: HJD1
My meaning is I have no knowledge of African culture save the north African area. I am sure they have a belief system and I know there were missionaries sent to Africa from many organizations... I just don't know if: there are terrorist activity amongst the folks there and what the name is or if it is "a religion" as I might know it.
The BBC has a nice site which gives a few facts about countries. I started you off with two.

Algeria

Since 1991 Algerian politics have been dominated by the struggle involving the military and Islamist militants. In that year a general election won by an Islamist party was annulled, marking the beginning of a bloody campaign which has seen the slaughter of tens of thousands of people.

Sudan
Apart from an 11-year period of peace, it has been torn by civil war between the mainly Muslim north and the Animist and Christian south since independence in 1956.
The country's name comes from the Arabic bilad al-sudan, or land of the blacks. Arabic is the official language and Islam the religion of the state, but the country has a large non-Arabic speaking and non-Muslim population which has rejected attempts by the government in Khartoum to impose Islamic shari'ah law on the country as a whole.

 

burnedout

Diamond Member
Oct 12, 1999
6,249
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[/b]58 % (21/36) of the groups indicated on the U.S. State Department 'Current List of Designated Foreign Terrorist Organizations' are considered "radical Islamic" by numerous sources

1. Abu Nidal Organization (ANO)
2. Abu Sayyaf Group
3. Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigade
4. Armed Islamic Group (GIA)
5. Asbat al-Ansar

6. Aum Shinrikyo
7. Basque Fatherland and Liberty (ETA)
8. Gama?a al-Islamiyya (Islamic Group)
9. HAMAS (Islamic Resistance Movement)
10. Harakat ul-Mujahidin (HUM)
11. Hizballah (Party of God)
12. Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan (IMU)
13. Jaish-e-Mohammed (JEM) (Army of Mohammed)
14. al-Jihad (Egyptian Islamic Jihad)

15. Kahane Chai (Kach)
16. Kurdistan Workers? Party (PKK) a.k.a. Kurdistan Freedom and Democracy Congress (KADEK)
17. Lashkar-e Tayyiba (LT) (Army of the Righteous)
18. Lashkar i Jhangvi

19. Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE)
20. Mujahedin-e Khalq Organization (MEK)
21. National Liberation Army (ELN)
22. Palestinian Islamic Jihad (PIJ)
23. Palestine Liberation Front (PLF)
24. Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP)
25. PFLP-General Command (PFLP-GC)
26. al-Qa?ida

27. Real IRA
28. Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC)
29. Revolutionary Nuclei (formerly ELA)
30. Revolutionary Organization 17 November
31. Revolutionary People?s Liberation Army/Front (DHKP/C)
32. Salafist Group for Call and Combat (GSPC)
33. Shining Path (Sendero Luminoso, SL)
34. United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC)
35. Communist Party of the Philippines/New People's Army (CPP/NPA)
36. Jemaah Islamiya organization (JI)

PKK was purposely excluded from the "Islamic" list. They hate Turks, not infidels.

Another Bush/Powell conspiracy, right? :p
 

LunarRay

Diamond Member
Mar 2, 2003
9,993
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Etech,

The BBC has a nice site which gives a few facts about countries. I started you off with two.

I guess it is obvious that I am woefully lacking in a working knowledge of some of the threads that I post in. I also don't spend the time needed to bring myself up to speed on the subject matter before I post something. Most information easily could be had with a bit of research. I think this frustrates some folks. So, I'll refrain from posting with out having at least a bit of info upon which to base an opinion. Hopefully, this will result in a reduction of what may be a truly worthless use of space and the time of others, like you, who are well versed in the worlds social issues or at least spend the time to educate themselves on the topic before posting worthless comments.
Again, thanks for the links. I do read them.
 

Moonbeam

Elite Member
Nov 24, 1999
69,674
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HJD1, this sort of reminds me of a story about Sufi acolyte and his bride. The two were married and the brides father gave them a copy of the Koran and told them, if they ever had need, to open it and read. Well they fell on hard times and after difficulties in the extreme came to the wife?s father reluctantly and on the advise of the Teacher, for help. The father cursed and yelled at the two when they explained their problem reminding them of his admonishment to read the Koran if they were in trouble. He told them to get out and go do so. Abject and in shock they left and opened the book. Inside they found a sum of money, enough to alleviate their problems. The Teacher brought them back to the father and said to him. Know sir, that your son in law has no need to open the Koran because he knows it by heart, and your daughter has no need to open it because, although she cannot read, she lives every word.

Just wanted you to know that I value you more for what is in your heart than what is in your mind. Love's the only thing that there's not enough of.
 

LunarRay

Diamond Member
Mar 2, 2003
9,993
1
76
Moonster,

Just wanted you to know that I value you more for what is in your heart than what is in your mind. Love's the only thing that there's not enough of.[/quote]

I think I have just received everything. Without which I'd have nothing. To have everything feels good... thank you!
 

Moonbeam

Elite Member
Nov 24, 1999
69,674
5,147
126
No problem, it's just that your humility scared me. If I have to wait till I know something to post here it's going to be a long wait. Damn it, I never let that stop me, you shouldn't either. I almost got a guilt complex. :D
 

LunarRay

Diamond Member
Mar 2, 2003
9,993
1
76
Solar ray
If I have to wait till I know something to post here it's going to be a long wait. Damn it, I never let that stop me, you shouldn't either. I almost got a guilt complex. :D[/quote]

By virtue of the power usurped by me from the current administration in DC, I have nominated you for a seat on the third bench on the left in downtown Oakland. The high honor of this position requires confirmation by the toga tribe who have voiced opposition but, will reluctantly avoid filibuster on the issue. With this lifetime seat you will be charged with faithfully enacting the exact change issues that may come before you. This role, of course, is cloaked in darkness and requires the light of day. To provide for the absence of this darkness you will be entitled to invoke the seldom used Writ of Estoppel on Darkness.
You will be provided by secret messenger the black box of Wonder. Inside are the details but, never, never, well hardly ever allow complexity of this office to influence your photonination upon the shallow waters of understanding to be muted...
I wonder what I just said?;)
 

Moonbeam

Elite Member
Nov 24, 1999
69,674
5,147
126
What you said was:

"By virtue of the power usurped by me from the current administration in DC, I have nominated you for a seat on the third bench on the left in downtown Oakland. The high honor of this position requires confirmation by the toga tribe who have voiced opposition but, will reluctantly avoid filibuster on the issue. With this lifetime seat you will be charged with faithfully enacting the exact change issues that may come before you. This role, of course, is cloaked in darkness and requires the light of day. To provide for the absence of this darkness you will be entitled to invoke the seldom used Writ of Estoppel on Darkness.
You will be provided by secret messenger the black box of Wonder. Inside are the details but, never, never, well hardly ever allow complexity of this office to influence your photonination upon the shallow waters of understanding to be muted..."

I will use the Writ of Estoppel on Darkness as judiciously as I can, but I can tell you I'm dying to try it out.
 

LunarRay

Diamond Member
Mar 2, 2003
9,993
1
76
Galactic Ray

I will use the Writ of Estoppel on Darkness as judiciously as I can, but I can tell you I'm dying to try it out.[/quote]

"What you said was:"
Is funny...

remember the illunimation quip..? I knew you would...

:D
 

etech

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
10,597
0
0
This forum is for intelligent discussions about the war in Iraq and related events in the Middle East. Passions are already high on all sides of these subjects so we ask all members to keep the following in mind:

1. Please keep your posts on topic for this forum.

2. Support your positions with facts and good links.

3. Please respect your fellow members. PERSONAL ATTACKS WILL NOT BE TOLERATED.

Rules subject to update as necessary.


AnandTech Moderator
Some people seem to have not read the rules of this forum, so I present them again. I hope it will not be necessary do this again.

 

Moonbeam

Elite Member
Nov 24, 1999
69,674
5,147
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HJD1, this sort of reminds me of a story about Sufi acolyte and his bride. The two were married and the brides father gave them a copy of the Koran and told them, if they ever had need, to open it and read. Well they fell on hard times and after difficulties in the extreme came to the wife?s father reluctantly and on the advise of the Teacher, for help. The father cursed and yelled at the two when they explained their problem reminding them of his admonishment to read the Koran if they were in trouble. He told them to get out and go do so. Abject and in shock they left and opened the book. Inside they found a sum of money, enough to alleviate their problems. The Teacher brought them back to the father and said to him. Know sir, that your son in law has no need to open the Koran because he knows it by heart, and your daughter has no need to open it because, although she cannot read, she lives every word.
------------------------------------------
I'm reminded here of this story because, if you read into it, the hidden implications are that, in converse, one may read the Koran daily and completely miss its essence. It is always thus with those who know the law but not the spirit of the law. When we look into the subject of terrorism, sometimes we can discuss it in a seemingly cogent fashion and never realize the implications to our own selves. That prompts me to ask, now, just exactly what is terrorism and what does it intend to accomplish.

I see terrorism as the attempt to use fear with the intention to control or impel others. But why would anybody do this? One would think, perhaps first off, that you would have to ask them since they are the ones doing it, but I think they would be the last to know. I suspect that the terrorist uses terror because he is himself a victim of it. We all know that civilized societies like our own use psychological counseling to help terror victims re-orient to normal life. They are encouraged to talk their experiences our and allow themselves to feel their guilt, shame, rage and fears, to purge themselves, as it were, of the traumatic experience by re-acquainting themselves of its details from a fresh and free perspective. We recognize the damage that terrorism does to the psyche and that it can induce its own resultant psychosis like the Stockholm syndrome, nightmares, flashbacks etc.

But if there is nobody to help the victim of terrorism the victim has to live with his internalized fear. This means that the victim of fear is in a state of terror, but unaware that terror is what motivates him. The result is a rigidity, a lack of spontaneity and flexibility, a need to control to insure the environment contains no threat real of perceived. (These symptoms probably should be expanded on greatly to better flesh them out, but in the interest of brevity, I hope this gives a general idea.) Forced to abandon the self confidence that adheres to all being, the terrorist seeks the comfort of externals, the controlled micromanaged, orderly world of rules which he himself is only too glad to make up if none are readily at hand.

I think it safe to say that religion uses terror quite frequently as part of it's attracting and holding power. But clearly one doesn't need religion to practice terror. All that is needed is to be afraid. There is no greater terrorist than the rat who finds himself cornered.

Of course there is perhaps something almost as objectionable, the one who says there is no corner. :D
 

LunarRay

Diamond Member
Mar 2, 2003
9,993
1
76
Moonbeam

There is no greater terrorist than the rat who finds himself cornered.

Of course there is perhaps something almost as objectionable, the one who says there is no corner. :D[/quote]

Interesting observation regarding that which I did not repost here.

But, the rat thing... You mean that if cornered he will use any and all means of escape because of his fear... Never corner a bear sorta notion... The one who says there is no corner, I assume, has forced the rat into a situation or the bear and seeks to not defuse the situation but, rather, to obfuscate the observer. Is this your meaning?
 

Moonbeam

Elite Member
Nov 24, 1999
69,674
5,147
126
No, I was referring to is that the trap which humans find themselves in is duality and that the seeker, the mind, the rat, the source of dissatisfaction, can never achieve unity because it is a fragment in search of itself, an eye that seeks sight of itself, an impossibility. The observer finally reaches it's limit and is cornered. The seeking is the division. There is no exit as the existentialist might say. With the full realization of the impossibility of escape comes recognition of the colossal joke that has been played. When the mind sees its own joke it can die. Gone then is the seeker and the seeking. There was no corner, no answer because there was no question. Some find the news rather disturbing especially if they haven't died yet.
 

LunarRay

Diamond Member
Mar 2, 2003
9,993
1
76
Originally posted by: Moonbeam
No, I was referring to is that the trap which humans find themselves in is duality and that the seeker, the mind, the rat, the source of dissatisfaction, can never achieve unity because it is a fragment in search of itself, an eye that seeks sight of itself, an impossibility. The observer finally reaches it's limit and is cornered. The seeking is the division. There is no exit as the existentialist might say. With the full realization of the impossibility of escape comes recognition of the colossal joke that has been played. When the mind sees its own joke it can die. Gone then is the seeker and the seeking. There was no corner, no answer because there was no question. Some find the news rather disturbing especially if they haven't died yet.
In "Caddy Shack" Bill Murry told of his time cadding for the Lama... for the effort Bill was told that when he died he would have total enlightenment... at least he has that going for himself. But, then he was already close to perfection... his world was simplicity. He sought understanding of little. He was open to much. He was enlightened.
Everything is nothing and nothing is eternal and eternal is everything and everything is seeking and seeking is everything.

 

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