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Discussion Which COVID-19 vaccine did you get?

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COVID Vaccine

  • Moderna

    Votes: 34 37.0%
  • Pfizer

    Votes: 39 42.4%
  • Johnson & Johnson

    Votes: 7 7.6%
  • AstraZeneca

    Votes: 3 3.3%
  • Not eligible yet

    Votes: 9 9.8%
  • QAnon/Bill Gates' nanobots conspiracy option

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    92

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
17,587
1,870
126
Just got my first Moderna shot this morning! Arm feels fine, and my cell phone reception seems to have improved! Can't wait for the second one!

Its FANTASTIC! I don't even NEED my phone to makes calls anymore! :p



And day 2 after Moderna #2 ... had some minor aches/chills overnight and at one point woke up soaked and shivering. Got up , took 1g Tylenol and a hot shower then slept till noon.

Feeling about 85% at the moment ... only issue is my energy levels are still low.
 
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Linux23

Lifer
Apr 9, 2000
11,050
452
126
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Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
29,604
3,329
126
that's the shot that that idiot mayor of Detroit rejected as a vaccine for lower class folk and not good enough for his city.


facking twat. :mad:
I saw that video, another jackass underqualified politician putting his foot in his mouth.
 
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Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
17,587
1,870
126
Might want to look for an alternative to the AZ based on the recent headlines....

Must say I agree ... see enough smoke and there has to be a least some fire with those clots. I would pass on AZ unless I had no other option. (to be clear if it was my ONLY option I would albeit reluctantly take it)

In Connecticut if you are patient and don't mind a 20-30 minute drive you can choose which you get between Moderna, Pfizer AND J&J.
 
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SKORPI0

Lifer
Jan 18, 2000
17,022
1,138
126
Sceduled for a J&J vaccine in 6 hours which took 3 weeks to get an appointment from the city. Indicates that 30,000 shots for Wed-Friday in Illinois.
 
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zinfamous

No Lifer
Jul 12, 2006
105,425
20,130
136
I think this may surface in time.

I do wonder how a vaccine was developed so quickly, previously scientists were saying 2-5 years best case scenario. Also after SARS nothing was done and it took many, many years for vaccine research to get anywhere.

Maybe I'm just a little skeptical, and perhaps since governments were throwing money at the problem it this resolved fairly quickly.
None of this is true, though.

The mRNA technology deployed in Pfizer and Moderna (actually, Moderna was and really just is an antibody company, and was early on contracted by the brainy fellow that developed the mRNA tool that eventually became these vaccines) was developed more than 10 years ago, and proved efficacious, in vivo, in model organism trials over years. The human trials last year were as robust as any standard previously met. Pfizer, I think, has now surpassed the data necessary for general release and not EUA. (...and that's at less than a year since deployment.) Now, as for those last two bits, it's certainly a function of the moment that with the pandemic being so hot, it's "easy" to get that kind of data in a very short amount of time, but that is the reality of the situation and it doesn't change the fact that the minimum standards, and beyond, were met.

A lot was done after SARS--in particular, AZ, I believe, and Merck and a few others were working on covid vaccines in response to SARS for several years. SARS was contained and proved less "pandemicy" than thought, so, as with market-driven research and technology, development was halted because it was too expensive to justify this tool that might not be necessary.

These vaccines have probably had as much, if not more testing, actually, than most other vaccines compared to their history of initial deployment.
 

Scarpozzi

Lifer
Jun 13, 2000
25,143
1,019
126
None of this is true, though.

The mRNA technology deployed in Pfizer and Moderna (actually, Moderna was and really just is an antibody company, and was early on contracted by the brainy fellow that developed the mRNA tool that eventually became these vaccines) was developed more than 10 years ago, and proved efficacious, in vivo, in model organism trials over years. The human trials last year were as robust as any standard previously met. Pfizer, I think, has now surpassed the data necessary for general release and not EUA. (...and that's at less than a year since deployment.) Now, as for those last two bits, it's certainly a function of the moment that with the pandemic being so hot, it's "easy" to get that kind of data in a very short amount of time, but that is the reality of the situation and it doesn't change the fact that the minimum standards, and beyond, were met.

A lot was done after SARS--in particular, AZ, I believe, and Merck and a few others were working on covid vaccines in response to SARS for several years. SARS was contained and proved less "pandemicy" than thought, so, as with market-driven research and technology, development was halted because it was too expensive to justify this tool that might not be necessary.

These vaccines have probably had as much, if not more testing, actually, than most other vaccines compared to their history of initial deployment.
They definitely appear to work. 24 hours after Moderna shot #2, I felt fatigue. 32 hours out, I had a splitting headache and fell asleep. That's not like me.

All I have to do now is wait 2 weeks and then hit the strip clubs to see if I'm immune.
 

SKORPI0

Lifer
Jan 18, 2000
17,022
1,138
126
Just came back from the Tinley Park Convention Center for my J&J shot. Long lines started to form outside when I arrived, luckily I was the 3rd in line. It was raining lightly. About >100 people in line by the time they opened the doors. Military all over the place. Show your appointment and I.D./Drivers License to enter. Military personnel to get your info, etc. and inform you that you're allowing them to give you the vaccine willingly and signature on a MS surface tablet. About 150 chairs to wait for your turn and about >50 people (non-military/nurses) with a table and syringes to give the shot. Barely felt the needle inserted 1" on my right arm. Told to go to another area with about >100 chairs and wait 15 minutes for any adverse reaction or symptoms before exiting. Saw a ambulance waiting near a door just in case. So it took from 9:40am-10:27am. Long lines after I left, still drizzling.

Another area in the building had Moderna shots, 1st and 2nd. Police all over the parking lot and front of the building too.

Partial selfie of me (guy in the black hoodie) 3rd in line for the J&J shot.

20210408_095056.jpg
 
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Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
29,604
3,329
126
It's true that the mRNA technology was developed and well developed long before this pandemic happened. It was developed in an effort to protect from anticipated pandemic of SARS around 20 years ago, but that pandemic never materialized as SARS' contagion turned out to be not that problematical. Still, the mRNA technology was recognized as being a very promising development with huge potential. So, when covid-19 hit (and hit big) in early 2020, mRNA vaccine technology was unshelved. They knew how to use it, knew it worked. The initial thing to do was to work up the mRNA to encase in the lipid nanoparticles that get absorbed by your cells, which then create the proteins (that mimic the SARS-CoV-2 spike proteins) that go into your body which provoke your immune response. The SARS-CoV-2 virus never enters your body in this scenario. Once the mRNA vaccines were created (AFAIK, only the Pfizer and Moderna), there needed to be lots of testing in phases before EUA's could be authorized.

I heard last night that the mRNA vaccines are currently data confirmed to provide immunity for over 200 days without boosters.

There are other potential uses for mRNA technology, it could very well be a huge area of development and application in the bio-medical fields going forward.
 
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repoman0

Diamond Member
Jun 17, 2010
3,347
1,638
136
Man that first Moderna shot was painful as all hell for a while starting an hour or two after I got it yesterday. Not sure if I’m just soft or what but I couldn’t even lift my arm last night. It’s better now that I’m taking ibuprofen. No illness or fatigue luckily.

We had an HVAC guy here today ... big dude who was saying he used to play football and his first shot was similarly worse than any hit he’d taken lol.
 

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
17,587
1,870
126
Man that first Moderna shot was painful as all hell for a while starting an hour or two after I got it yesterday. Not sure if I’m just soft or what but I couldn’t even lift my arm last night. It’s better now that I’m taking ibuprofen. No illness or fatigue luckily.

We had an HVAC guy here today ... big dude who was saying he used to play football and his first shot was similarly worse than any hit he’d taken lol.

I'm thinking a LOT of the arm pain (or lack thereof) associated with the vaccines has to do with the shot-giver being careful.

Also from what I've been told it's better to take Tylenol for this.
 

Amol S.

Senior member
Mar 14, 2015
802
108
106
I have a question. Why did the CDC never thought of issuing a FLU shot at the same seating as the COVID-19 shot.
 

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