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What's with the idiots who use their flashes in big open areas?

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Sqube

Diamond Member
Dec 23, 2004
3,078
1
0
Originally posted by: Aharami
iSpider
uFailure.

That said, I think that a lot of people don't know that having the flash go on in that situation will make your pictures come out *****. If anything, I wouldn't use the flash because I wouldn't think the flash would have a measurable effect on something that far away.

Would that make me right by broken clock syndrome?
 

DrPizza

Administrator Elite Member Goat Whisperer
Administrator
Mar 5, 2001
49,606
162
111
www.slatebrookfarm.com
This almost belongs in digital video and cameras, but I'm going to pretend that forum is only for digital cameras and make believe that everyone at baseball games has those $4.99 disposable cameras where you really don't have a choice if it flashes or not.
 

OutHouse

Lifer
Jun 5, 2000
36,414
616
126
Originally posted by: Lalakai
with the right camera and equipment, you can take flash shots from a long ways away; you just have to know to juggle the settings to compensate. I agree though with an earlier statement where the person pointed out that most of the people taking the pictures, use their cameras on auto, and the camera will use the flash, resulting in a picture that is basically worthless as the subject was too far away to benefit from the flash.

if you do it right, you can take some extremely interesting pictures using flashes, and different types of flash (strobe, slaved, ect.).
not true. most digital camera flashes have a range of 20-25 feet.

i have a detachable honeywell flash for my 35mm that has a range of 60-70 feet.
 

Demon-Xanth

Lifer
Feb 15, 2000
20,551
2
81
With a lot of the digital cameras I've used, if you turn off the flash, it ramps up the exposure time to something much larger that results in a blurry image unless the camera and what you're taking a picture of are perfectly still. Leave the flash on and everything works.
 

mugs

Lifer
Apr 29, 2003
48,902
10
81
Originally posted by: foghorn67
Or you want to meter for what is on the infield, and fill flash the rest. Don't mock what you don't understand.
If he was talking about some other situation, I would have said the same thing. But you know that the vast majority of the people taking pictures at a baseball game have no idea what you're talking about, and most of them just want to get the action on the field, not whatever surrounds them in the stands (if it's even in the frame).
 

Sinsear

Diamond Member
Jan 13, 2007
6,434
79
91
Originally posted by: Syringer


I must admit though, it's a nice effect when tons of flashes go off consecutively..
It is pretty cool. I was at Yankee Stadium the night before Arod hit 500. Every pitch was like a festival of flashes. Was pretty neat looking IMO.
 

Syringer

Lifer
Aug 2, 2001
19,333
2
71
Originally posted by: Demon-Xanth
With a lot of the digital cameras I've used, if you turn off the flash, it ramps up the exposure time to something much larger that results in a blurry image unless the camera and what you're taking a picture of are perfectly still. Leave the flash on and everything works.
It's much better to risk a blurry image in hopes of getting a good clear image than to ALWAYS having a bad, dark image.
 

Eos

Diamond Member
Jun 14, 2000
3,451
2
81
Originally posted by: Turin39789
Originally posted by: foghorn67
Or you want to meter for what is on the infield, and fill flash the rest. Don't mock what you don't understand.
I think he's talking about those moments at major sporting events when the entire audience is flashing away. In fact its pretty clear that is what he is talking about. There is no way that is what all of those people are doing. Or even what 2% of them are doing
You wouldn't see the people who know what they're doing because their flash is not firing... :D
 

TallBill

Lifer
Apr 29, 2001
46,044
62
91
Originally posted by: DrPizza
This almost belongs in digital video and cameras, but I'm going to pretend that forum is only for digital cameras and make believe that everyone at baseball games has those $4.99 disposable cameras where you really don't have a choice if it flashes or not.
The tough choices that one has to live with for the rest of his life, those of an Anandtech Moderator.
 

LTC8K6

Lifer
Mar 10, 2004
28,520
1,573
126
The flash range on the pocket cams that those folks are using is probably not more than 20 feet at the most.

The flash is doing nothing for the vast majority of them, except lighting up the heads of the folks near them.

You see the same thing at a Nascar race. People 200 feet away from their subject with the flash firing.

Of course, it's really just that they have the thing on Auto, and in the end, that's as it should be for most people.

What's really cool is the flash system set up for the NBA. Big flash guns up in the ceiling, wireless transmitters on the cameras to trigger them.



 

feralkid

Lifer
Jan 28, 2002
15,445
3,005
126
Originally posted by: Lalakai
with the right camera and equipment, you can take flash shots from a long ways away; you just have to know to juggle the settings to compensate. I agree though with an earlier statement where the person pointed out that most of the people taking the pictures, use their cameras on auto, and the camera will use the flash, resulting in a picture that is basically worthless as the subject was too far away to benefit from the flash.

if you do it right, you can take some extremely interesting pictures using flashes, and different types of flash (strobe, slaved, ect.).


Is ect "ectoplasmic" for taking photos of ghosts?
 

mugs

Lifer
Apr 29, 2003
48,902
10
81
Originally posted by: LTC8K6
What's really cool is the flash system set up for the NBA. Big flash guns up in the ceiling, wireless transmitters on the cameras to trigger them.
Yeah, I've noticed that at hockey games before. Pretty cool.
 

Demon-Xanth

Lifer
Feb 15, 2000
20,551
2
81
Originally posted by: Syringer
Originally posted by: Demon-Xanth
With a lot of the digital cameras I've used, if you turn off the flash, it ramps up the exposure time to something much larger that results in a blurry image unless the camera and what you're taking a picture of are perfectly still. Leave the flash on and everything works.
It's much better to risk a blurry image in hopes of getting a good clear image than to ALWAYS having a bad, dark image.
But I never have a problem with a dark image. Unless I don't use a flash. Only blurry ones. I understand the theory, but I think the cameras I've used are designed for stupid and don't work well when you try to think.
 

Jeff7

Lifer
Jan 4, 2001
41,599
17
81
Originally posted by: sehlaw
I would guess that a large percentage are using their cameras on "auto" mode (or something similar). The dark surroundings cause the flash to go up.
Exactly. They probably don't know a thing about how to use their cameras.
 

Lalakai

Golden Member
Nov 30, 1999
1,634
0
76
Originally posted by: Citrix
Originally posted by: Lalakai
with the right camera and equipment, you can take flash shots from a long ways away; you just have to know to juggle the settings to compensate. I agree though with an earlier statement where the person pointed out that most of the people taking the pictures, use their cameras on auto, and the camera will use the flash, resulting in a picture that is basically worthless as the subject was too far away to benefit from the flash.

if you do it right, you can take some extremely interesting pictures using flashes, and different types of flash (strobe, slaved, ect.).
not true. most digital camera flashes have a range of 20-25 feet.

i have a detachable honeywell flash for my 35mm that has a range of 60-70 feet.

agreed on both points. by syncing an external flash you can easily get 60-70 feet. by juggling the shutter speed and using a flash focusing filter, you can push it further. What i said is true, as you just pointed out.
 

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