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What's the etymology of your first name?

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Dimmu

Senior member
Jun 24, 2005
890
0
0
DEREK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DER-ek [key]
From a Low German form of THEODORIC

From the Gothic name Thiudreiks meaning "ruler of the people", derived from the Germanic elements þeud "people" and ric "power, ruler". Theodoric the Great was a 6th-century king of the Ostrogoths who eventually became the ruler of Italy.
 

lizardth

Golden Member
Oct 5, 2005
1,242
0
71
ELIZABETH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: ee-LIZ-a-beth [key]
From ???saßet (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name ??????????? ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath" or perhaps "my God is abundance". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.

The name was borne in the 12th century by Saint Elizabeth, a daughter of King Andrew II of Hungary who became a Franciscan nun and lived in poverty. It was also the name of a ruling queen of England and an empress of Russia. Famous modern bearers include the British queen Elizabeth II and actress Elizabeth Taylor.
 

2Xtreme21

Diamond Member
Jun 13, 2004
7,045
0
0
Originally posted by: Crazee
WILLIAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WIL-ee-am, WIL-yam [key]
From the Germanic name Wilhelm, which was composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". The name was introduced to Britain by the Normans. It has belonged to several rulers of England, Prussia, and Germany, including William the Conqueror, the first Norman king of England. Other famous bearers were Willian Wallace, a 13th-century Scottish hero, and William Tell, a legendary 14th-century Swiss hero. In the literary world it has been borne by dramatist William Shakespeare and poet William Blake, as well as contemporary authors William Faulkner and William S. Burroughs.
 

invidia

Platinum Member
Oct 8, 2006
2,151
1
0
LUCIFER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Theology
Pronounced: LOO-si-fur [key]

Means "bringing light", derived from Latin lux "light" and ferre "to bring". This name originally referred to the morning star, Venus, but later became associated with the chief angel who rebelled against God's rule in heaven. Even later it became associated with Satan himself.


I'm serious. I first found out what my name was and meant at 8.
 

Rike

Platinum Member
Oct 14, 2004
2,614
2
81
MICHAEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Czech, Biblical

Pronounced: MIE-kul (English), MI-khah-el (German) [key]
From the Hebrew name ???????? (Mika'el) which meant "who is like God?". This is the name of one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies, and thus is considered the patron saint of soldiers.

This was the name of nine Byzantine emperors and a czar of Russia. Other more modern bearers of this name include the 19th-century chemist/physicist Michael Faraday and basketball player Michael Jordan.

Also the first or second most popular male name in the U.S. From 1950 through 2006.
 

mrSHEiK124

Lifer
Mar 6, 2004
11,491
2
0
ABD-ALLAH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: ??? ???? (Arabic)
Means "servant of God" from Arabic ??? ('abd) "servant of" combined with ???? (Allah) "God". This was the name of the father of the Prophet Muhammad.
 

Akhen

Golden Member
Nov 14, 2005
1,431
0
71

RAPHAEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, French, Biblical

Pronounced: RAF-ee-el (English), RAY-fee-el (English), ra-fa-EL (French) [key]
From the Hebrew name ??????? (Refa'el) which meant "God has healed". Raphael was one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition. In the Book of Tobit in the Old Testament it is told how he aided Tobias. This was also the name of a 16th-century Renaissance painter, the designer of several of the frescoes in the Vatican Palace in Rome.
 

ThePresence

Elite Member
Nov 19, 2001
27,730
16
81
Originally posted by: mrSHEiK124
ABD-ALLAH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: ??? ???? (Arabic)
Means "servant of God" from Arabic ??? ('abd) "servant of" combined with ???? (Allah) "God". This was the name of the father of the Prophet Muhammad.
I have the same name in Hebrew.
Ovadyah or Ovadia is (ovad or eved) "servant of" Yah "God".
It's Obadiah in English although nobody has ever called me that.
 

Squisher

Lifer
Aug 17, 2000
21,207
65
91
CRAIG
Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: KRAYG [key]

From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic creag meaning "crag" or "rocks". The surname originally belonged to a person who lived near a crag.

Also, derived from the Armenian and Hungarian parents and deemed to rock and party like a rockstar and unable to know his own limits and needs to grow up.

 

mrSHEiK124

Lifer
Mar 6, 2004
11,491
2
0
Originally posted by: ThePresence
Originally posted by: mrSHEiK124
ABD-ALLAH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: ??? ???? (Arabic)
Means "servant of God" from Arabic ??? ('abd) "servant of" combined with ???? (Allah) "God". This was the name of the father of the Prophet Muhammad.
I have the same name in Hebrew.
Ovadyah or Ovadia is (ovad or eved) "servant of" Yah "God".
It's Obadiah in English although nobody has ever called me that.
Heh, when I took Hebrew I and II at USF, my professor made my Hebrew name Ovadyah when I told her what my name meant in Arabic. Obadah (also with an ayin) is a popular name in Arabic.
 

ThePresence

Elite Member
Nov 19, 2001
27,730
16
81
Originally posted by: mrSHEiK124
Originally posted by: ThePresence
Originally posted by: mrSHEiK124
ABD-ALLAH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: ??? ???? (Arabic)
Means "servant of God" from Arabic ??? ('abd) "servant of" combined with ???? (Allah) "God". This was the name of the father of the Prophet Muhammad.
I have the same name in Hebrew.
Ovadyah or Ovadia is (ovad or eved) "servant of" Yah "God".
It's Obadiah in English although nobody has ever called me that.
Heh, when I took Hebrew I and II at USF, my professor made my Hebrew name Ovadyah when I told her what my name meant in Arabic. Obadah (also with an ayin) is a popular name in Arabic.
I have some Syrian friends who call me Abdallah for fun. :)
 

Excelsior

Lifer
May 30, 2002
19,048
17
81
Originally posted by: Crazee
WILLIAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WIL-ee-am, WIL-yam [key]
From the Germanic name Wilhelm, which was composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". The name was introduced to Britain by the Normans. It has belonged to several rulers of England, Prussia, and Germany, including William the Conqueror, the first Norman king of England. Other famous bearers were Willian Wallace, a 13th-century Scottish hero, and William Tell, a legendary 14th-century Swiss hero. In the literary world it has been borne by dramatist William Shakespeare and poet William Blake, as well as contemporary authors William Faulkner and William S. Burroughs.
 

Scouzer

Lifer
Jun 3, 2001
10,359
4
0
DAVID

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Jewish, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian, Czech, Slovene, German, Biblical

Other Scripts: ????? (Hebrew), ????? (Russian)

Pronounced: DAY-vid (English), dah-VEED (Hebrew), da-VEED (French), dah-VEET (Russian), DAH-fit (German) [key]
Possibly derived from Hebrew ??? (dvd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. Jesus was supposedly descended from him.

Famous bearers of this name include the 5th-century patron saint of Wales, two kings of Scotland, empiricist philosopher David Hume, and explorer David Livingstone. This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens' semiautobiographical novel 'David Copperfield'.
 

blakeatwork

Diamond Member
Jul 18, 2001
4,117
1
81
BLAKE
Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BLAYK [key]

From a surname which was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blac "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake
 

xanis

Lifer
Sep 11, 2005
17,571
7
0
BRIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: BRIE-an [key]
The meaning of this name is not known for certain but it is possibly related to the Old Celtic element bre meaning "hill", or by extension "high, noble". Brian Boru was an Irish king who thwarted Viking attempts to conquer Ireland in the 11th century. He was victorious in the Battle of Clontarf, but he himself was slain.
 

Dimmu

Senior member
Jun 24, 2005
890
0
0
Originally posted by: invidia
LUCIFER
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Theology
Pronounced: LOO-si-fur [key]

Means "bringing light", derived from Latin lux "light" and ferre "to bring". This name originally referred to the morning star, Venus, but later became associated with the chief angel who rebelled against God's rule in heaven. Even later it became associated with Satan himself.


I'm serious. I first found out what my name was and meant at 8.
So who are you named after, man? I've never heard that name before!
 

imported_Cameron

Senior member
Oct 11, 2005
571
0
0
CAMERON

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: KAM-u-run, KAM-run [key]
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose". The Camerons were one of the great Highland clans.
 

illusion88

Lifer
Oct 2, 2001
13,164
3
81
ROBERT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Scandinavian, German, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Romanian

Other Scripts: ?????? (Russian)

Pronounced: RAH-burt (English), ro-BER (French), RO-bert (German), RAW-bert (Polish), RO-byert (Russian) [key]
Means "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain. It belonged to three kings of Scotland, including Robert the Bruce who restored the independence of Scotland from England in the 14th century. The author Robert Browning and poets Robert Burns and Robert Frost are famous literary bearers of this name. Also, Robert E. Lee was the commander of the Confederate army during the American Civil War.
 

Journer

Banned
Jun 30, 2005
4,355
0
0
JONATHAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Scandinavian, Biblical

Pronounced: JAHN-a-than (English), YO-nah-tahn (German) [key]
From the Hebrew name ?????????? (Yehonatan) (contracted to ???????? (Yonatan)) meaning "YAHWEH has given". In the Old Testament Jonathan was the eldest son of Saul and a friend of David. He was killed in battle with the Philistines. A famous bearer of this name was Jonathan Swift, the satirist who wrote 'Gulliver's Travels' and other works.

yahweh has given me a mind good enough to be skepticle of his existance with...mwuahaha
 

StinkyMojo

Golden Member
Nov 15, 2004
1,283
0
71
HADI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: ???? (Arabic)
Means "religious guide" in Arabic.
 

doze

Platinum Member
Jul 26, 2005
2,786
0
0
Zachary is a masculine name. It is of Hebrew origin. The meaning of the name Zachary is God or Yahweh has remembered. Zachary is an alternative spelling of the name Zechariah. Zechariah, a minor prophet of the Old Testament, wrote the Book of Zechariah.

In the New Testament, Zechariah is the name of the father of John the Baptist. He expressed his disbelief and was temporarily made numb. Other alternative names for Zachary or Zechariah are Sachairi, Sakari, Sakke, Saku, Yahweh, Zacarias, Zach (the nickname of most men called Zachary), Zachariah, Zak and Zakhar
 

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