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What music are you listening to now?

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May 11, 2008
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A song from the year 1973.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2VB2LdOU6vo

REDBONE - We Were All Wounded at Wounded Knee

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redbone_(band)
In 1973 Redbone released the politically oriented "We Were All Wounded at Wounded Knee", recalling the massacre of Lakota Sioux Indians by the Seventh Cavalry in 1890. The song ends with the subtly altered sentence "We were all wounded 'by' Wounded Knee". It charted in several European countries and reached the #1 position in The Netherlands but did not chart in the U.S. where it was initially withheld from release and then banned by several radio stations.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manifest_Destiny

Manifest Destiny was the 19th century American belief that the United States was destined to expand across the continent. It was used by Democrats in the 1840s to justify the war with Mexico; the concept was denounced by Whigs, and fell into disuse after the mid-19th century.

Advocates of Manifest Destiny believed that expansion was not only wise but that it was readily apparent (manifest) and inexorable (destiny).

The concept of American expansion is much older, but John L. O'Sullivan coined the exact term "Manifest Destiny" in the July/August 1845 issue of the United States Magazine and Democratic Review in an article titled "Annexation."[1][2] It was primarily used by Democrats to support the expansion plans of the Polk Administration, but the idea of expansion faced opposition from Whigs like Henry Clay, Daniel Webster, and Abraham Lincoln who wanted to deepen the economy rather than broaden its expanse. John C. Calhoun was a notable Democrat who generally opposed his party on the issue, which fell out of favor by 1860.[3]

The belief in an American mission to promote and defend democracy throughout the world, as expounded by Abraham Lincoln and Woodrow Wilson, continues to have an influence on American political ideology
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Manifest destiny.
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We where all wounded by wounded knee.
 
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BurnItDwn

Lifer
Oct 10, 1999
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Well, I've listened to the New Opeth CD about 10 times thus far, I still don't know what to make of it. I guess It's good, but it didn't shake my very perception of what good music could be like the first time I heard Morningrise ....
 
May 11, 2008
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Erik Satie - Gymnopedies 3 orchestrated by Claude debussy and orchestra ?

I find it enchanting.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KUlZylqILKI



The Gymnopédies, published in Paris starting in 1888, are three piano compositions written by French composer and pianist, Erik Satie.

These short, atmospheric pieces are written in 3/4 time, with each sharing a common theme and structure. Collectively, the Gymnopedies are regarded as the precursors to modern ambient music - gentle yet somewhat eccentric pieces which, when composed, defied the classical tradition. For instance, the first few bars feature a disjunct chordal theme in the bass - first, a G-major 7th in the bass, and then a B-minor chord, also in the lower register. Then comes the one-note theme in D major. Although the collection of chords at first seems too complex to be harmonious, the melody soon imbues the work with a soothing atmospheric quality.

By the end of 1896 Satie's popularity and financial situation were ebbing. Debussy, whose popularity was rising at the time, helped draw public attention to the work of his friend.

Debussy expressed his belief that the 2nd gymnopédie did not lend itself to orchestration. (Orchestrations of this gymnopédie were only realised many decades later, by other composers, and without being frequently performed). Thus, on February 1897, Debussy orchestrated the 3rd and the 1st only, reversing the numbering: First gymnopédie (original piano setting by Satie) → 3rd gymnopédie (orchestration by Debussy) Third gymnopédie (original piano setting by Satie) → 1st gymnopédie (orchestration by Debussy)
 
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