What did you have for dinner? (or going to have)

RossMAN

Grand Nagus
Feb 24, 2000
78,794
266
116
from El Burrito Loco

El Burrito Loco
Chicken Fajita taco

Delicious
 

Cyberian

Diamond Member
Jun 17, 2000
9,999
1
0
The syntax from the command line is much more difficult in psql starting out----but it's easy to get used to. Personally, I've used both MySQL and Postgres gui tools (almost all of them) and I always end up going back to the command shell. That's how I learned em both, and they're my favorite. phpmyadmin and the same tool for postgres work well though through a web interface.

As far as comparing MySQL to a true RDBMS, in the real world there is NO comparison. MySQL doesn't enforce the Atomicity of transactions, nor does it support row level locking ( a default setting in MsSQL and Oracle), nor does it support SPs or Triggers.

Mysql also has a 4GB DB Size limitation and Postgres has a 64 GB limitation as of the last versions I used.

If you're using Mysql or Postgres in a multi-user environment where multiple reads/writes can be committed to the database----you'll have to write your own mechanism for locking records to avoid writing collisions.

Pre Mysql 4.0 the biggest difference between Mysql and Postgres was the lack of support for foreign keys in Mysql. While you can still use Lookup records in much the same way---mysql doesn't enforce an once of a DB Model on the DB Side. If you have a "related" table in MYSQL there's nothing preventing you from inserting a dubious record in your lookup field other then your own code.

Postgres does do the job of handling foreign keys fairly well, and it does allow for user defined functions. However----on larger databases---like the last project I worked on with it we had a 15 GB db, the performance differential is very noticeable. I've lost my timing chart that I created for Posgres vs MSSql on that project---but in some cases with multiple inserts and deletes with cascading constraints----Postgres was 300% to 400% slower. [edit] ON massive updates with multiple join queries to the reporting tables (all dynaically created on each call of a report) postgres was sometimes 2000% - 3000% slower. Granted---that was an unfair test for postgres as the entire process involved a table delete by key, multiple query build to temp recordset, followed by a massive row by row insert. I could have really kicked postrgres's arse w/ MSSql if I had moved that code to all Sp's and triggers---but I just tested it from a web client keeping all the recordsets local to the web server. It was also an unfair test in the way that the reports worked too---they weren't being pulled from SPs...but on large reports, the Crystal Engine had to pull all of the results for each report, and then pull each subreport results as well----and the crystal pull is multi-threaded....so even the rendering favored MSSQL in that case.......

But---all in all----there are clear cases where Mysql is a good alternative. And cases as well where Postgres fits the bill. THe company I was at was a non-profit company, and they saved a buttload using Postgres instead of a true RDBMS----but a year after I left they convert4ed to oracle b/c the database size & the performance drop-down was too much for the 40 or so users to deal with.
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wfbberzerker

Lifer
Apr 12, 2001
10,423
0
0
Originally posted by: Cyberian
The syntax from the command line is much more difficult in psql starting out----but it's easy to get used to. Personally, I've used both MySQL and Postgres gui tools (almost all of them) and I always end up going back to the command shell. That's how I learned em both, and they're my favorite. phpmyadmin and the same tool for postgres work well though through a web interface.

As far as comparing MySQL to a true RDBMS, in the real world there is NO comparison. MySQL doesn't enforce the Atomicity of transactions, nor does it support row level locking ( a default setting in MsSQL and Oracle), nor does it support SPs or Triggers.

Mysql also has a 4GB DB Size limitation and Postgres has a 64 GB limitation as of the last versions I used.

If you're using Mysql or Postgres in a multi-user environment where multiple reads/writes can be committed to the database----you'll have to write your own mechanism for locking records to avoid writing collisions.

Pre Mysql 4.0 the biggest difference between Mysql and Postgres was the lack of support for foreign keys in Mysql. While you can still use Lookup records in much the same way---mysql doesn't enforce an once of a DB Model on the DB Side. If you have a "related" table in MYSQL there's nothing preventing you from inserting a dubious record in your lookup field other then your own code.

Postgres does do the job of handling foreign keys fairly well, and it does allow for user defined functions. However----on larger databases---like the last project I worked on with it we had a 15 GB db, the performance differential is very noticeable. I've lost my timing chart that I created for Posgres vs MSSql on that project---but in some cases with multiple inserts and deletes with cascading constraints----Postgres was 300% to 400% slower. [edit] ON massive updates with multiple join queries to the reporting tables (all dynaically created on each call of a report) postgres was sometimes 2000% - 3000% slower. Granted---that was an unfair test for postgres as the entire process involved a table delete by key, multiple query build to temp recordset, followed by a massive row by row insert. I could have really kicked postrgres's arse w/ MSSql if I had moved that code to all Sp's and triggers---but I just tested it from a web client keeping all the recordsets local to the web server. It was also an unfair test in the way that the reports worked too---they weren't being pulled from SPs...but on large reports, the Crystal Engine had to pull all of the results for each report, and then pull each subreport results as well----and the crystal pull is multi-threaded....so even the rendering favored MSSQL in that case.......

But---all in all----there are clear cases where Mysql is a good alternative. And cases as well where Postgres fits the bill. THe company I was at was a non-profit company, and they saved a buttload using Postgres instead of a true RDBMS----but a year after I left they convert4ed to oracle b/c the database size & the performance drop-down was too much for the 40 or so users to deal with.
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bahahah pwned.
 

Kerouactivist

Diamond Member
Jul 12, 2001
4,665
0
76
Originally posted by: human2k
Subway: Chicken Teryaki Footlong w/Pepsi. Yummy!

I used to really like those until I ralphed after eating one. Now I can't stand to look at them.

Now you will always remember that sandwich, as the sandwich which made me ralph after eating it .

good day

HEHE
 

Darein

Platinum Member
Nov 14, 2000
2,640
0
0
Some chicken, mashed potatoes, aparagus, and a protein shake. Good stuff, although the potatoes were much too cheesy.
 

8WOOD

Banned
May 9, 2003
76
0
0
Pork Roast and a spud.
BTW Im from idaho so you always have a spud on hand for dinner:)
 

UNCjigga

Lifer
Dec 12, 2000
24,784
8,959
136
A tanqueray and tonic aperitif, crab cake appetizer, a vegetable crepe thingie with tomatoes, artichoke hearts, asparagus, goat cheese and some other stuff (sounds yuck but it was AWESOME!), a glass of pinot noir from Napa, and a thick piece of raspberry/blackberry cobbler with ice cream for dessert!

The restaurant where I ate tonite
 

4Lclovergirl

Senior member
Mar 25, 2003
474
0
0
2 brother's pizza, I have boycotted Domino's (long story) but a bunch of us got got together before going out and had to fill our stomach's with somehting so we wouldn't be too lightweight :p
 

conjur

No Lifer
Jun 7, 2001
58,686
3
0
Fish 'n Chips at Molly Malone's, washed down by a nice glass of Guinness. My date had a veggie pasta dish (with enough food on the plate to feed a family of 10!).
 

TheBoyBlunder

Diamond Member
Apr 25, 2003
5,742
1
0
fish & chips, salad with some tasty dressing, piece of chocolate moose cake from the parisan bakery, big ol' glass of milk.
 
Apr 5, 2000
13,256
1
0
What's the point of "eating healthy" at Subway if you wash it down with soft drink? *scratches head*

White rice, chicken and pork, and green vegetables
 

Wingznut

Elite Member
Dec 28, 1999
16,968
2
0
I cooked myself a steak covered in sauteed mushrooms and onions, and a salad (with ranch dressing, of course). :)