Transfer speeds windows 8 to windows 7

Feb 13, 2014
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Hello,

I setup two systems attached to my network that are hardwired.

System 1 is running Windows 8.1, System 2 is running Windows 7 X64 Ultimate.

I setup my homegroup and am able to access the two shared folders on the Windows 7 system. The Windows 7 system acts as my HTPC and I store my media there from the Windows 8 Machine.

My issue is when transferring files across the network I am only getting speeds of 10 MB/11MB. I was under the impression that my network supported 100 MB transfer rates.

Each system has a gigabit lan card so I know that is not the issue.

What can I do to increase the speeds over the 11 MB? It takes quite some time to transfer large movies at that rate.

Thanks!
 

Charlie98

Diamond Member
Nov 6, 2011
6,206
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Might want to have a mod move this to Computer Help... it might get a little more exposure.
 

Dirigible

Diamond Member
Apr 26, 2006
5,950
6
81
Also: ID any bottlenecks. Your computers have gigabit, but what about the rest of your LAN?
 

Maiyr

Member
Sep 3, 2008
117
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Network speeds are generally rated in Mbps (Mega Bits Per Second). I am guessing your network is 100 Mbps, not 100MBps (Mega Bytes). If that is the case then your 10MBps transfer speeds are utilizing your 100Mbps connection.

I could be crazy though!
 

Dirigible

Diamond Member
Apr 26, 2006
5,950
6
81
Network speeds are generally rated in Mbps (Mega Bits Per Second). I am guessing your network is 100 Mbps, not 100MBps (Mega Bytes). If that is the case then your 10MBps transfer speeds are utilizing your 100Mbps connection.

I could be crazy though!
That'd be my guess too. There's probably a 100Mbs bottleneck somewhere.
 

piasabird

Lifer
Feb 6, 2002
17,183
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91
It doesn't matter what your transfer speed is. Drives only work so fast??? Writing it to the second drive probably takes longest.

A switch should be capable of 200Mbs.
 
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piasabird

Lifer
Feb 6, 2002
17,183
60
91
Might try a gigabit switch or router and Cat 6. Not only is gigabit faster but it has more throughput.

So do you really need to be that fast for some reason?

There are a lot of factors that can slow you down like Cache size on the drives and usable RAM.

I was reading an article on HDMI and using files that are not HDCP complient can slow down playing video sometimes. Even the Media player you use can slow you down. If the output from the Media Player is not HDCP complient with HDMI it will be forced to decode the sound and reincode it as 2 channel audio.
 
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piasabird

Lifer
Feb 6, 2002
17,183
60
91
I use to have teenagers with computers at my house playing games over the network. That will slow things down. When you get 4 computers on a network all doing diff things over the Internet it might be a bit slower. There might be some tricks you can use with a media server to shield it from all internet activity but let you still access it.
 

Fallen Kell

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
5,353
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It doesn't matter what your transfer speed is. Drives only work so fast??? Writing it to the second drive probably takes longest.

A switch should be capable of 200Mbs.
That 200 is bi-directional (i.e. 100Mbps down and 100Mbps up simultaneous). In the case of transferring files, it is pretty much a 1 way connection (with just packet received acknowledges in the other direction).

10-11MBps transfer speed is about correct for a 100Mbps network (10-11MBps = 80-88Mbps, add the overhead of the packets and transfer protocol and you are at the max speed).

You could consider upgrading to a 1GB switch. Most integrated network cards in motherboards have been 1GB for 10 years or so now. Switches are also very cheap. But don't expect much more than 20-30MB if you upgrade due to the speed of your actual disks, unless you are running multi-disk RAID and/or SSDs.
 

velis

Senior member
Jul 28, 2005
600
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Hub relays every packet to every connected client. As a result there are tons of collisions and other ineficacies in the network traffic. Switch "intelligently" only relays it to destination client. You don't want a hub, even if you do take the pain of finding one of the few still available. They were pretty much phased out years ago.
 

DesiPower

Lifer
Nov 22, 2008
15,328
718
126
How exactly will a switch help? dont you need internet on your computers? then wont you have to connect through the routers anyways? maybe a gigabit router would have helped?

Just curious, I am a network noob so might be dumb questions...
 
Feb 13, 2014
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the router will still send info to the switch then thr switch divides it to the proper address. the switch for me is primary for file ttansfers between my main pc and htpc
 

velis

Senior member
Jul 28, 2005
600
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@DesiPower: Local network traffic doesn't go through internet. Having a fast local network alows for good data transfer speeds / low latencies among your home computers / gadgets. But that doesn't mean you will have any better torrent / youtube / whatever transfers. That is a completely separate network with a completely different transfer speed / latency.
In between your local network and internet there's a little box that says "router" on it and that box is actually responsible for deciding where a particular network packet is going to go. If it's directed from one local comp to another local comp, it will never see internet and will remain on the fast local network. If you're watching youtube though, that packet will go through several more routers (not in your home) to arrive at youtube server which will then send you the requested video in many, many packets - but only as fast as your internet connection is (and theirs, of course).
 
Feb 13, 2014
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Upgraded to a gigabit switch and now all is well, transfer rate of 85 MB a second :).

I feel kind of dumb, but thanks for the help everyone!
 
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