Tired of hearing about 'Fragmentation', but...

Discussion in 'Mobile Devices & Gadgets' started by stormkroe, Apr 1, 2012.

  1. MrX8503

    MrX8503 Diamond Member

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    I don't develop apps, but I develop websites. I'll create a website that'll work across browsers, but it increases development costs. I'm assuming Android developers go through the same thing but on a much extreme level.

    This is why apps get delayed, are buggy, or aren't released first on Android. For example it took forever for Android to get Netflix and Skype (or Skype video). Netflix and Skype aren't mom n pop shop developers either.
     
  2. Bateluer

    Bateluer Lifer

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    Baloney. If you follow standard code, 99% of websites will look fine across any browser.

    Netflix and Skype aren't typical cases, as both can easily chew through a LOT of data. Carriers don't want you sucking down a GB or more a day watching Netflix. Carriers make the Netflix/Skype devs jump through hoops, bring up a handful of devices at a time, etc. When the first Netflix apks leaked, it was easy to simple change your device ID string and make the app work on nearly any Android device. Until they got wise and found other methods to artificially block the app.

    Even if the carriers could charge you buy the MB used, there isn't enough spectrum and bandwidth for every wireless user to treat it as a home cable line.
     
  3. QueBert

    QueBert Lifer

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    Unless your site's CSS heavy, because Microsoft doesn't believe in following the CSS standards. It's a PITA to make a site that uses CSS look the same in IE as all other browsers.
     
  4. MrX8503

    MrX8503 Diamond Member

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    Baloney? Do you do development work?

    IE doesn't follow standard code.

    http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2011/11/03/“but-the-client-wants-ie-6-support”/

    If you want entire web browser support its time and money. Every developer is different, but I charge for it.

    That's a stretch and if you're not on the dev team, I'm gonna chalk that up as your assumption.

    What about Temple Run app? The android app is buggy. There are numerous apps that are either delayed or buggy when its ported to Android. Users don't really see the work that goes into an app because they rely on the developer to just make it work.

    The truth is that its more work for the developer, so Android users have to wait longer for an app.
     
  5. ponyo

    ponyo Lifer

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    Why don't you guys talk about the positives of fragmentation?
     
  6. alent1234

    alent1234 Diamond Member

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    nice for you but i'm not going to be telling my mom to root her phone, look for apk's on the internet or whatever. she just wants it to work and i don't want phone calls asking me stupid questions
     
  7. Red Storm

    Red Storm Lifer

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    Pretty sure his point was that Netflix was purposefully fragmented. In this particular situation, the coding for variable SoCs argument doesn't hold much weight when all it took is one simple change to get it working.

    I would sympathize with devs who complain about having to code for variable systems, but PC application devs have been doing it for years and years...
     
  8. badb0y

    badb0y Diamond Member

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    PC applications also cost more.
     
  9. alent1234

    alent1234 Diamond Member

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    no, netflix had issues with making DRM work on the different CPU/GPU combinations out there. Same with skype, either the original tegra or the tegra 2 didn't support NEON or something like that and that ruled out skype working on those phones for video calls
     
  10. Red Storm

    Red Storm Lifer

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    In other words, the application worked fine, it's the DRM (that didn't stop pirates anyway) that needed work.
     
  11. Pia

    Pia Golden Member

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    Plus, while the PC platform has a lot of variance, very little of it has any effect on PC developers. The lowest common denominator of e.g. 95% of existing PCs running XP or better is quite high, which translates to little work being necessary to make the same app work on all of those machines. Developers working closely with hardware, such as game devs, are an exception.
     
  12. Puddle Jumper

    Puddle Jumper Platinum Member

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    The same is true for Android as well, the vast majority of Android devices are 2.2 or higher so as long as developers target API Level 8 their app should work on fine for most users.
     
  13. WelshBloke

    WelshBloke Lifer

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    Thats a bit of a weird argument.

    How many analogs of CM are there for other mobile OSs?
     
  14. MrX8503

    MrX8503 Diamond Member

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    Speaking of app support. Instagram is available for Android 2.2 and up now. I don't use it, but I know its a big deal for some.
     
  15. Pia

    Pia Golden Member

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    Targeting the 95% of the PC market I was talking about, you can assume things like decent keyboard and exact pointing ability, at least 1024x768 screen, tons of performance. The lowest common denominator of 95% of Android devices is terrible, and an app designer is very likely to be hamstringed by it.
     
  16. akugami

    akugami Diamond Member

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    You're trying to say there is no fragmentation issue on Android. There is.

    On iOS there is no fragmentation issue because there isn't really any device differentiation. Even then, there are some issues that may crop up between the different iOS versions or between an older model iPhone or iPad. There is some fragmentation on iOS but the impact is tiny because there's only been 6 models of iPhones total and 3 iPads as well as 4 OS revisions.

    On Android, our developers have to account for different screen sizes, different hardware, different OS revisions, and to top it off different skins. All with their own quirks.

    What you stated does not refute what I said. What you stated actually reinforces my point that fragmentation is an issue. You put a straw man argument saying that having to bug test for different devices is part of development. That's true, it is. Even on iOS it is. But that doesn't change the fact that fragmentation is an issue. All of those apps that "work perfectly" on most major devices had to go through bug testing. They didn't magically come out of the chute working on all devices.
     
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