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This trump/Republican party narrative needs to end

ivwshane

Lifer
May 15, 2000
28,182
7,997
136
I've been reading and seeing an increase in the narrative that trump has replaced or killed the Republican party and the party has abandoned all its core principles, this is false.

Trump has simply exposed the GOP for what it is and what it's always been since Reagan. Trump's policies are the culmination of Republican policies, from the belief of a failed economic policy (trickle down), to tax breaks for the wealthy and big businesses. Trump's huge deficit policy are the same as they were under Reagan (and pretty much every Republican president). He's all about cutting/gutting social safety nets and big military spending. He's corrupted the office of the presidency. He courted white evangelicals. He used fear mongering just like Reagan did. Trump even parrots the same talking points Reagan did with regards to health care. They both even corrupted the office.
Hell, they both even ignored health issues.

So no, trump hasn't replaced the GOP he's simply brought it to its logical conclusion.




Ps
The articles aren't necessary other than to show examples of what people are saying.
 
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dawp

Lifer
Jul 2, 2005
10,310
1,521
126
I tend to agree with you, trump is symptom of the GOP, he is a reflection of the current party, when they change the party name to the trump party is when I start thinking otherwise.
 

UNCjigga

Lifer
Dec 12, 2000
22,531
4,698
136
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pauldun170

Diamond Member
Sep 26, 2011
7,149
2,330
136
Maybe someone who saw this happen from the inside should write a book about... oh wait, they already did?


NPR did an interesting interview with him last week (ish).
 

Juiblex

Senior member
Sep 26, 2016
299
89
101
Make Israel Great Again!

But lets vote in another Zionist, why don't we, that'll change things.
 

nickqt

Diamond Member
Jan 15, 2015
5,999
4,038
136
I've been reading and seeing an increase in the narrative that trump has replaced or killed the Republican party and the party has abandoned all its core principles, this is false.

Trump has simply exposed the GOP for what it is and what it's always been since Reagan. Trump's policies are the culmination of Republican policies, from the belief of a failed economic policy (trickle down), to tax breaks for the wealthy and big businesses. Trump's huge deficit policy are the same as they were under Reagan (and pretty much every Republican president). He's all about cutting/gutting social safety nets and big military spending. He's corrupted the office of the presidency. He courted white evangelicals. He used fear mongering just like Reagan did. Trump even parrots the same talking points Reagan did with regards to health care. They both even corrupted the office.
Hell, they both even ignored health issues.

So no, trump hasn't replaced the GOP he's simply brought it to its logical conclusion.




Ps
The articles aren't necessary other than to show examples of what people are saying.
Trump is the most Republican Republican in the history of the Republican Party.

Just ask 64 million Republicans who voted for him.
 

UNCjigga

Lifer
Dec 12, 2000
22,531
4,698
136
NPR did an interesting interview with him last week (ish).
I haven’t read it yet—but it’s on my Libby hold list.

“Stuart Stevens spent decades electing Republicans at every level, from presidents to senators to local officials. He knows the GOP as intimately as anyone in America, and in this new book he offers a devastating portrait of a party that has lost its moral and political compass.

This is not a book about how Donald J. Trump hijacked the Republican Party and changed it into something else. Stevens shows how Trump is in fact the natural outcome of five decades of hypocrisy and self-delusion, dating all the way back to the civil rights legislation of the early 1960s. Stevens shows how racism has always lurked in the modern GOP's DNA, from Goldwater's opposition to desegregation to Ronald Reagan's welfare queens and states' rights rhetoric. He gives an insider's account of the rank hypocrisy of the party's claims to embody "family values," and shows how the party's vaunted commitment to fiscal responsibility has been a charade since the 1980s. When a party stands for nothing, he argues, it is only natural that it will be taken over by the loudest and angriest voices in the room.

It Was All a Lie is not just an indictment of the Republican Party, but a candid and often lacerating mea culpa. Stevens is not asking for pity or forgiveness; he is simply telling us what he has seen firsthand. He helped to create the modern party that kneels before a morally bankrupt con man and now he wants nothing more than to see what it has become burned to the ground.
 

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