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The "I just bought..." thread.

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highland145

Lifer
Oct 12, 2009
41,295
4,133
136
They do that around here, and least in some ways. They have leds at the dollar store for $1 of course, and goodwill gets them also, as well as discounts at homedepot and such. You know damned well they cost more than $1 to make and sell. They're being subsidized by the energy company. Works for me too.
I'm all for more efficiency.

We have a new solar farm outside of town. Just looked it up but it's not showing on google so no idea how big it is...or who's it is. Too bad it's so expensive/kwh. That damned solyndra... ;)
 

Hayabusa Rider

Admin Emeritus & Elite Member
Jan 26, 2000
50,880
4,212
126
That was an interesting article. Bias ply was a bit before my driving time, but there was still a lot of literature comparing/contrasting the styles when I started driving, though everyone was using radials at that point.
I was a kid but I remember going to Pep Boys with my father and being woken up when a tire blew out, something that was common.
 

Paratus

Lifer
Jun 4, 2004
14,644
7,892
146
Whatcha makin?
A couple of things. My 18 year old craftsman router ate itself so I wanted a new one that could take my old 1/4in bits but let me buy 1/2in bits.

I’ve got it in a router table I built to fit my collapsible work bench. (Knobs and feather board I 3D printed)4161ABF1-4379-4572-8112-8AFA1E735F05.jpeg

We’re extending an attic closet and I’ve got a lot of shelves to build in

I’m also fixing a shit job my contractor did installing new kitchen cabinets.

I had create a new front panel for two drawers. They needed a dado and some dovetails routed to match the original pieces he lost/ruined.

I've got this on my projects list for April:

the nice thing about the Bosch is after doing the gross height adjustment under the table I can do fine adjustments above the router table with a hex key.
 

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
45,310
2,674
126
the nice thing about the Bosch is after doing the gross height adjustment under the table I can do fine adjustments above the router table with a hex key.
Very nice! My ultimate goal is to build an assembly table with a flip-down hole in the middle to put mobile boxes like a mini portable router, hot wire cutter, inverted jigsaw, etc. I have a limited amount of space, so a multi-function trap door would be really nice!
 
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KMFJD

Lifer
Aug 11, 2005
21,961
22,729
136
I just bought a new coffee grinder, old one broke, the new one grinds extremly fine , perfect for espresso machine

/coffee is way stronger now
 

snoopy7548

Diamond Member
Jan 1, 2005
6,489
3,339
136
Just recently bought a new router:


View attachment 17812
That's a nice one - I have it. I don't have a jointer, so I bought a 2" spiral downcut flush-trim bit and have used it with an aluminum straight edge to "joint" edges for some table top glue-ups. Does very well.

I also bought the handheld Colt 1.25HP version last year which is nice for lighter work, but there doesn't seem to be any dust collection attachments available for it, so I've just dealt with the mess the best I can. I recently did some edge forming around plywood for some cabinet doors I'm making for my workbench, and the mess was unbelievable.

At some point, like Kaido, I really want to build a router table. I've got this one on my mind:
 
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TXHokie

Platinum Member
Nov 16, 1999
2,492
121
106
AMD Ryzen combo with watercooler and 2060 video card. Gave it all to my kid to upgrade his rig and I inherit his old rig so I can play BFV after a good many yrs absence from online gaming. Find out I suck now...then again I was never any good. Great fun tho.
 
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Reactions: Perknose

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
45,310
2,674
126
That's a nice one - I have it. I don't have a jointer, so I bought a 2" spiral downcut flush-trim bit and have used it with an aluminum straight edge to "joint" edges for some table top glue-ups. Does very well.

I also bought the handheld Colt 1.25HP version last year which is nice for lighter work, but there doesn't seem to be any dust collection attachments available for it, so I've just dealt with the mess the best I can. I recently did some edge forming around plywood for some cabinet doors I'm making for my workbench, and the mess was unbelievable.

At some point, like Kaido, I really want to build a router table. I've got this one on my mind:
I'm in the process of building my G table. My approach is GBB: Good, Better, Best. It prevents me from going into perfectionism mode & stalling out, lol. So the G table is my "good enough" table...doesn't have all of the features yet, but it will get me started! My current design is:

1. 4x8' table, nice large size

2. Top table is 1/2" MDF covered with industrial carpet. I learned this trick from a college job doing assembly work for custom houses. It creates an anti-skid surface & is easily vacuumed up. It's just the tightly-knit thick stuff you get from Home Depot...you use spray glue to get it on the board, wrap it around the edges, and staple it.

3. I also have a 4x8' sheet of $10 melamine board, kind of like a thin whiteboard material, for when I need a really flat surface. Otherwise I just grab an oversized cutting mat for quick jobs.

4. I got these super-nice locking, leveling caster wheels. They're not cheap ($80 a set), but they can hold 2,400 pounds, they lock without having a big kick arm that you trip over, and they can level your table.

5. The bottom shelf is a 4x8' sheet of plywood. My CNC machine is going under there (1000mm X-Carve), along with a Dustopper dust collection system. I've been reading about the dangers of fine dust by Bill Pentz; my unfinished half-basement is unventilated & I'll be cutting MDF, so I have invisible dust AND resin to worry about. I got a cheap air quality monitor off eBay (9-in-1 unit, about $40 shipped) to monitor the dust when I start using it. I found a really cool enclosure design on reddit that I'm going to try out, which uses three tricks: it's slightly not fully sealed, so that sucks the air in, then there's a dust boot for chips & a separate air hose for the chamber. I dunno how well it will work, but I'll find out later this month!

6. I found a monster 24-outlet surge protector from Amazon Basics for $40, so I can plug the whole universe in easily.

Down the road, I want to add on:

1. Some sliding shelves under the top table, with soft-close mechanisms.

2. A cutout for various portable boxes (upside-down jigsaw for quick cuts, hot-wire for foam, router lift for doing edges, etc.) The CNC will handle most of the work, but the trap-door setup will be nice for quick jobs or things that need to be done by hand.

3. A vise setup on the side.

4. A vacuum table for the CNC machine

5. A pegboard system on the wall. I'm very interested in permanent solutions that won't fall apart; currently looking at this metal setup & then hanging it up with some French cleats (I have cinder-block walls down in the basement).

Progress is a bit slow as I don't have a ton of free time at home & I'm on building this setup a budget, so I chip away on it as I can. So far:

1. Got the lighting up. Got a 10-pack of LED florescent-style lights. It's so white & bright that you could surgery in my basement lol. Turns on & off instantly, super-low power usage, easy to hang up, and they all plug together with built-in outlets & cords on each fixture!

2. Finally retired my ~20-year-old stool & got a nicer one with wheels. I don't have a ton of space in my basement, so my goal is to have literally everything on wheels so that I can easily move things around & reconfigure the layout as necessary.

3. Picked up a rolling cart with 22 bins. Easy way to store hand tools & misc stuff.

4. I also use baker's racks on wheels & full-sized baker's trays (18x26"). If you shop around, you can get the racks & trays used for super cheap - check eBay, Craigslist, local kitchen supply stores, Facebook marketplace, etc. This is waaaaaay cheaper than even the cheapo shop carts at Home Depot, let alone the nicer stuff like Snap On & whatnot. It's a crazy nice setup because you can see all of your tools, adjust the height of the racks, slide them out to get what you need, and even fully remove a tray to put on your assembly table to use while you're working on a project - great hack!

5. I'm using a Dustopper dust separator system for the CNC machine, which is kind of like a mini horizontal cyclone. Snaps onto a $5 Homer bucket & plugs into whatever shop vac you have available (yay Black Friday deals!). I'd love to get a Clear Vue system a la Bill Pentz, but $3k+ is out of my budget for this project (plus the noise issue, plus available space).

6. Aside from the CNC dust-collection system, I also put up an air filter. It's a large WEN unit. If you wait around, it goes on sale for $200 or less from time to time. Once I get things up & running fully later this month, I'll be monitoring the air quality with the sensor & see how effective this setup is. I may have to pipe out through the dryer vent lol.

7. I'm building a large 12-foot countertop (basically the entire side wall haha) on the side of the workspace for my 3D printer, Cricut, and other goodies. The idea being to make a mini Maker's Lab type of setup. I started doing custom signage for my IT clients using the vinyl cutter & it will be nice to have a permanent location where I can just sit down & use it!

The electrical & flooring is done, next step is building the table & testing the dust-collection systems!
 
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Paratus

Lifer
Jun 4, 2004
14,644
7,892
146
Very nice! My ultimate goal is to build an assembly table with a flip-down hole in the middle to put mobile boxes like a mini portable router, hot wire cutter, inverted jigsaw, etc. I have a limited amount of space, so a multi-function trap door would be really nice!
That’s a good idea. I’m short on space too. I have a two car garage but when I’m not doing major home improvements we actually keep two cars in it. The router table I built is nice because I can completely take it apart in about 5 minutes. The router plate comes out, the fence comes off and get hung on a wall and the table slides in next to the garage fridge. The workbench then folds up and hangs on the wall.
I’ve also got a small crappy job site table saw. Just made a mitre sled for it which has upped the usability and safety. Now I need to make a better insert plate since it uses a non-standard metal one with a massive gap around the blade.
That's a nice one - I have it. I don't have a jointer, so I bought a 2" spiral downcut flush-trim bit and have used it with an aluminum straight edge to "joint" edges for some table top glue-ups. Does very well.

I also bought the handheld Colt 1.25HP version last year which is nice for lighter work, but there doesn't seem to be any dust collection attachments available for it, so I've just dealt with the mess the best I can. I recently did some edge forming around plywood for some cabinet doors I'm making for my workbench, and the mess was unbelievable.

At some point, like Kaido, I really want to build a router table. I've got this one on my mind:
That’s a really good idea. I’ve done a little jointing by putting a couple of very thin washers on the outfeed side of the fence and using a spiral bit to take off the washer thickness from a bad board. It works ok but I like the idea of using a flush trim bit and a truly straight - straight edge.
 

snoopy7548

Diamond Member
Jan 1, 2005
6,489
3,339
136
I'm in the process of building my G table. My approach is GBB: Good, Better, Best. It prevents me from going into perfectionism mode & stalling out, lol. So the G table is my "good enough" table...doesn't have all of the features yet, but it will get me started! My current design is:

1. 4x8' table, nice large size

2. Top table is 1/2" MDF covered with industrial carpet. I learned this trick from a college job doing assembly work for custom houses. It creates an anti-skid surface & is easily vacuumed up. It's just the tightly-knit thick stuff you get from Home Depot...you use spray glue to get it on the board, wrap it around the edges, and staple it.

3. I also have a 4x8' sheet of $10 melamine board, kind of like a thin whiteboard material, for when I need a really flat surface. Otherwise I just grab an oversized cutting mat for quick jobs.

4. I got these super-nice locking, leveling caster wheels. They're not cheap ($80 a set), but they can hold 2,400 pounds, they lock without having a big kick arm that you trip over, and they can level your table.

5. The bottom shelf is a 4x8' sheet of plywood. My CNC machine is going under there (1000mm X-Carve), along with a Dustopper dust collection system. I've been reading about the dangers of fine dust by Bill Pentz; my unfinished half-basement is unventilated & I'll be cutting MDF, so I have invisible dust AND resin to worry about. I got a cheap air quality monitor off eBay (9-in-1 unit, about $40 shipped) to monitor the dust when I start using it. I found a really cool enclosure design on reddit that I'm going to try out, which uses three tricks: it's slightly not fully sealed, so that sucks the air in, then there's a dust boot for chips & a separate air hose for the chamber. I dunno how well it will work, but I'll find out later this month!

6. I found a monster 24-outlet surge protector from Amazon Basics for $40, so I can plug the whole universe in easily.

Down the road, I want to add on:

1. Some sliding shelves under the top table, with soft-close mechanisms.

2. A cutout for various portable boxes (upside-down jigsaw for quick cuts, hot-wire for foam, router lift for doing edges, etc.) The CNC will handle most of the work, but the trap-door setup will be nice for quick jobs or things that need to be done by hand.

3. A vise setup on the side.

4. A vacuum table for the CNC machine

5. A pegboard system on the wall. I'm very interested in permanent solutions that won't fall apart; currently looking at this metal setup & then hanging it up with some French cleats (I have cinder-block walls down in the basement).

Progress is a bit slow as I don't have a ton of free time at home & I'm on building this setup a budget, so I chip away on it as I can. So far:

1. Got the lighting up. Got a 10-pack of LED florescent-style lights. It's so white & bright that you could surgery in my basement lol. Turns on & off instantly, super-low power usage, easy to hang up, and they all plug together with built-in outlets & cords on each fixture!

2. Finally retired my ~20-year-old stool & got a nicer one with wheels. I don't have a ton of space in my basement, so my goal is to have literally everything on wheels so that I can easily move things around & reconfigure the layout as necessary.

3. Picked up a rolling cart with 22 bins. Easy way to store hand tools & misc stuff.

4. I also use baker's racks on wheels & full-sized baker's trays (18x26"). If you shop around, you can get the racks & trays used for super cheap - check eBay, Craigslist, local kitchen supply stores, Facebook marketplace, etc. This is waaaaaay cheaper than even the cheapo shop carts at Home Depot, let alone the nicer stuff like Snap On & whatnot. It's a crazy nice setup because you can see all of your tools, adjust the height of the racks, slide them out to get what you need, and even fully remove a tray to put on your assembly table to use while you're working on a project - great hack!

5. I'm using a Dustopper dust separator system for the CNC machine, which is kind of like a mini horizontal cyclone. Snaps onto a $5 Homer bucket & plugs into whatever shop vac you have available (yay Black Friday deals!). I'd love to get a Clear Vue system a la Bill Pentz, but $3k+ is out of my budget for this project (plus the noise issue, plus available space).

6. Aside from the CNC dust-collection system, I also put up an air filter. It's a large WEN unit. If you wait around, it goes on sale for $200 or less from time to time. Once I get things up & running fully later this month, I'll be monitoring the air quality with the sensor & see how effective this setup is. I may have to pipe out through the dryer vent lol.

7. I'm building a large 12-foot countertop (basically the entire side wall haha) on the side of the workspace for my 3D printer, Cricut, and other goodies. The idea being to make a mini Maker's Lab type of setup. I started doing custom signage for my IT clients using the vinyl cutter & it will be nice to have a permanent location where I can just sit down & use it!

The electrical & flooring is done, next step is building the table & testing the dust-collection systems!
I recently bought that same WEN air filter! It does a good job. I can do some woodworking, turn it on, walk out for an hour, come back and my garage won't smell like wood dust.

I do need to get a dust collection system going. I've got my eye on the Grizzly G1029Z2P, and I would add a Wynn 35A canister filter and probably a Super Dust Deputy.

 

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
45,310
2,674
126
I recently bought that same WEN air filter! It does a good job. I can do some woodworking, turn it on, walk out for an hour, come back and my garage won't smell like wood dust.

I do need to get a dust collection system going. I've got my eye on the Grizzly G1029Z2P, and I would add a Wynn 35A canister filter and probably a Super Dust Deputy.

Dang, that's a beast! And glad to hear that about the WEN!

This month, I'll be experimenting with air quality in the unventilated room while cutting, and also noise levels. I'm probably going to try something like a combination of EPS panels & egg-crate foam to dampen the sound for the CNC & for the shop vac that runs the dust-collection system. Plan B is to send the dust out via the dryer vent & put a fan in the doorway to act as makeup air from the rest of the house. I definitely don't want to be breathing in fine invisible dust or resin! (from cutting MDF)

Super excited to finish setting up the shop! I'm a big believer in having readily-accessible "battlestations" where all of your equipment is laid out & ready to go so that you can get to work, instead of having to get geared up to get to work before you can do the work. Outside of cooking, I've been so slammed with work that I haven't really done anything super creative in, like, years lol. I'm hoping the CNC setup will negate the need for a large number of hand & power tools, as I can just whip it up in CAD & then cut it out with precision automatically. Time to get back into speaker-building!!
 

skyking

Lifer
Nov 21, 2001
19,509
1,236
136
typical costco trip minus the toilet paper. The corona virus has scared everyone into making a run on TP.
Freaks, I need some !#$% toilet paper!
 

sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
83,873
8,851
126
typical costco trip minus the toilet paper. The corona virus has scared everyone into making a run on TP.
Freaks, I need some !#$% toilet paper!
They are making diy mask with rolls of tp
 

lxskllr

No Lifer
Nov 30, 2004
54,485
4,487
126
K&N has been proven to let more particulate through than paper filter...
That's not an oil bath air cleaner. That's ricer snake oil. An oil bath cleaner pulls the air through oil like a bong, and the oil traps particulates. That's how real VWs worked. You bought 4qt of oil, 3.5 went in the motor, and the other .5 went in the air cleaner.
 

rh71

No Lifer
Aug 28, 2001
52,644
846
126
Just bought a small air compressor to air up basketballs and bike tires. Got one on Amazon for $24: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B07QR4Q42L/ref=ppx_od_dt_b_asin_title_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I don't like that it only has the cigarette lighter plug and not one for a wall socket but it should do the trick for my needs.
I bought this power supply adapter to help with that, but apparently the voltage or whatever isn't enough to power my air compressor correctly. The air compressor works via a car cig lighter every time while this adapter only works some of the time. Anyone know why? I use it to blow up bicycle tires too so the cig lighter interface is not ideal.

adapter: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B078RZQ9WY/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
air compressor: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06XCG24KJ/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

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