String Trimmer Cord Melting?

Raizinman

Platinum Member
Sep 7, 2007
2,300
25
91
Bought an Echo String Trimmer at Home Depot last year (end of season special), but never used it much. Now, just starting to use it and after about 10 or 15 minutes, the cord quits coming out. When I disassemble the head, I find that the cord has slightly melted to itself which is why it won't come out. I checked the Echo website and it said to put lubricant on the cord. I sprayed some WD40, and it helped a little, but it still melts requiring me to remove the head to separate the cord. Is there something better to use besides WD40? Anybody else have this problem with string trimmers?
 

cabri

Diamond Member
Nov 3, 2012
3,617
1
81
I have a Toro from 5 years ago that this has always happened.

I think that this only happened when I put a new line on the reel.
Suspicion is that the method of winding causes the problem.
 

NutBucket

Lifer
Aug 30, 2000
26,293
227
106
That's odd. I don't give any special care when I reload the reel and have never had this problem.
 

highland145

Lifer
Oct 12, 2009
40,057
3,301
136
Same as NB. Is it caused by the friction of the head on the ground? Is there a better quality cord you can get?
 

Zivic

Diamond Member
Nov 25, 2002
3,498
35
91
try better string... and a better lube...

I would put a little bar/chain oil on it (like a 30w oil)
 

cabri

Diamond Member
Nov 3, 2012
3,617
1
81
try better string... and a better lube...

I would put a little bar/chain oil on it (like a 30w oil)
Getting my string at ACE Hardware. But I may be trying to put way to much on the real and to tight:\
 

Howard

Lifer
Oct 14, 1999
47,988
8
81
I've never had this problem and I've used several very old Weed Eater units.
 

boomerang

Lifer
Jun 19, 2000
18,897
638
126
Makes me wonder if you've got a bearing at the end of the shaft that's getting really hot with that heat transferring into the trimmer head. Something is making it hot.

But it could just as easily be some of the cheaper line from China. (Everything is from China now.)
 

Zorba

Diamond Member
Oct 22, 1999
7,389
1,328
126
Makes me wonder if you've got a bearing at the end of the shaft that's getting really hot with that heat transferring into the trimmer head. Something is making it hot.

But it could just as easily be some of the cheaper line from China. (Everything is from China now.)
Probably this.

I bet I have the same trimmer as you OP, the gearbox can get quite hot, but I've never seen any melting on the line. I use the Echo orange line from HD.
 

Raizinman

Platinum Member
Sep 7, 2007
2,300
25
91
I spent the day talking to Echo Factory. Here is what they told me about this problem.

This condition is commonly called trimmer line "welding" and results from ultrasonic resonance of the line within the spool. It can happen with any type of line, but is more prevalent with round shaped line than with square or hexagonal line. The ambient outside temperature does not significantly contribute to line welding. Line welding is encouraged by: sustained high speed trimming against a hard stationary surface (fences, curbing, walls, etc.) and wrapping the line on the bump head spool in a rotationally twisted manner. You can minimize line welding by using a lower head speed when trimming against hard objects and varying the throttle speed. It also helps to let the line hang free and rotate the spool around the line when loading the spool. Most people hold the spool stationary and wind the line around the spool. This technique tends twist the line rotationally which causes the line to bind and fuse together due to the ultrasonic vibration.

To avoid this problem, he told me to soak the trimmer cord in water 24 hours or more before using it, as it will make the cord less brittle and more flexible. Also to spray lube on the cord. If the problem continues, to use a cord with aluminum or titanium in it.
 

boomerang

Lifer
Jun 19, 2000
18,897
638
126
^^^^^^^^^

Oh yeah, ultrasonic welding, that was going to be my next guess. :whiste: j/k
I like the fact that they talked to you and that they were aware of the problem and that the problem was technical in nature. :awe: Nice that they had some solutions too. :thumbsup:
 

LTC8K6

Lifer
Mar 10, 2004
28,523
1,568
126
I would carefully examine the head to make sure it is only the line melting. If it's only the line, then it probably is what Echo said. If anything else plastic is melting, then it's probably a bearing or gearbox getting hot.

WD40 probably just evaporates with the heat and doesn't do much.

Try an actual oil lube, or even a few drops of motor oil.
 

Raizinman

Platinum Member
Sep 7, 2007
2,300
25
91
It is only the trimmer cord melting. WD40 did virtually nothing. I will try a thicker oil and perhaps a dab of axle grease.
 

Anubis

No Lifer
Aug 31, 2001
78,727
412
126
That's odd. I don't give any special care when I reload the reel and have never had this problem.
Same as NB. Is it caused by the friction of the head on the ground? Is there a better quality cord you can get?

yea never seen this happen in 20+ years of having a cord trimmer. currently have a huskvarna and its never happened

I just use whatever generic cord I find at the store and ive never lubed the cord
 

cabri

Diamond Member
Nov 3, 2012
3,617
1
81
I spent the day talking to Echo Factory. Here is what they told me about this problem.

This condition is commonly called trimmer line "welding" and results from ultrasonic resonance of the line within the spool. It can happen with any type of line, but is more prevalent with round shaped line than with square or hexagonal line. The ambient outside temperature does not significantly contribute to line welding. Line welding is encouraged by: sustained high speed trimming against a hard stationary surface (fences, curbing, walls, etc.) and wrapping the line on the bump head spool in a rotationally twisted manner. You can minimize line welding by using a lower head speed when trimming against hard objects and varying the throttle speed. It also helps to let the line hang free and rotate the spool around the line when loading the spool. Most people hold the spool stationary and wind the line around the spool. This technique tends twist the line rotationally which causes the line to bind and fuse together due to the ultrasonic vibration.

To avoid this problem, he told me to soak the trimmer cord in water 24 hours or more before using it, as it will make the cord less brittle and more flexible. Also to spray lube on the cord. If the problem continues, to use a cord with aluminum or titanium in it.
thanks :thumbsup:
 

iamwiz82

Lifer
Jan 10, 2001
30,756
0
71
I use Echo Crossfire cord with my SRM-225 and have never welded it. My old Ryobi would constantly do this, though.
 

mindless1

Diamond Member
Aug 11, 2001
5,157
384
126
Wind the cord looser. Use up what you have with some baby powder sprinkled in instead of oil or other liquid lube which gums up with vegetative debris and isn't good for the lawn.

Once you've gone through that spool of cord, try another make/model. The x-shaped cord is far less likely to stick to itself though it also breaks off at a faster rate so you're buying more and winding more often. They claim it cuts better too but IMO if you have a decent trimmer there won't be cutting problems until you get to something that needs a saw blade.
 

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