Starter Golf Clubs

MisfitsFiend

Platinum Member
Jun 19, 2001
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I am interested in this also - I have taken a class, and recently my husband has won a golf outing...

Do I need to get clubs right away, if I rent from the club will they look at me funny?

Do I need spikes right away as well?
 

GagHalfrunt

Lifer
Apr 19, 2001
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Define "starter". Are you just taking up the game or have you been playing for a while with a borrowed set and are ready to move to something of your own? If you're truly just starting don't buy clubs. Beg, borrow or steal a set to use for 6 months until you become somewhat competent, then get fit for an inexpensive beginner set. If you've been playing for a little while, like the game, intend to stick with it and can hit the ball reasonably well then find a local clubmaker and get fitted for a set that suits your body and your swing.

And yes, get yourself a good pair of comfortable golf shoes with softspikes ASAP. A solid base is the foundation of a good swing, you'll struggle to improve if your feet are slipping.
 

vi edit

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 28, 1999
62,387
8,154
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Got a Play it Again Sports nearby? They (at least used to) carry some Golden Bear sets. Really nice clubs for the money. Very nice bag, 400cc titanium driver, 3W, 5W, 3-9I, PW, and putter. Used to be able to get them for around $250 a set.

Some of them forego the 3I for a hybrid club.
 

i wouldn't buy clubs until your swing is fully developed and consistent

then you can get fit and have clubs that really fit your swing

additionally, if you're new and want to continue playing golf - get a few lessons
the first few lessons will fix your swing and stance and grip
 

purbeast0

No Lifer
Sep 13, 2001
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i would recommend to atleast get steel shafted irons in regular flex for a beginner.

also, if you aren't hung up on brand name, check out http://www.lowprogolf.com . I recently made the switch from OEM golf clubs to component golf clubs. it saves you TONS in $$$ and lets you get the club built PERFECTLY to your specs, and the clubs are just as good (if not better) than brand name OEM clubs. I just got a new full set of irons for $220 from that site, but that was also me picking a shaft that I wanted. You can get built sets about $100 cheaper than that from the site.

if you go there, ask for Bryant. he will do you wonders. he put together a GREAT driver for me and now, 3 weeks later, had me ordering a full set of irons from him. Also, you will get %10 off if you mention the forums over at http://www.freegolfinfo.com (another GREAT site for golf information).
 

MX2

Lifer
Apr 11, 2004
18,651
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I have also had interest in learning to golf lately:) A friend of mine suggested a cheapy set with a few hours and a bucket of balls at the local driving range. I cant wait to get some free time for this:D
 

purbeast0

No Lifer
Sep 13, 2001
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honestly, i wouldn't spend over $150 - $200 on a brand new, full set (Driver, 3w,5w,3i - PW), if you are just trying to learn golf. I would probably even head over to some golf forums and pick up a used set for about $100. then if you like it and develop your swing more, then get some clubs more fitted to your swing style.
 

MisfitsFiend

Platinum Member
Jun 19, 2001
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Thanks! What is the best way to go after my first set of lessons?

I don't feel confident enough to go on a course by myself yet - just get a bucket o'balls and go to a range?

My husband won 9 holes of golf for two - should I see if I can trade it in for more lessons or the driving range, or just go any try the 9 holes?
 

Slvrtg277

Golden Member
Sep 9, 2004
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linkI picked these up just today. $238.00 including tax and a bag of tees. People I've talked to have said it's a good starter set, and they were cheap.

 

vi edit

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 28, 1999
62,387
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Originally posted by: Slvrtg277
linkI picked these up just today. $238.00 including tax and a bag of tees. People I've talked to have said it's a good starter set, and they were cheap.

That's very similar to the set my wife and a friend of mine have. They paid $250 for it retail. They are really happy with the set as well.

It really is a pretty quality set up for the $$. Bigger name brands (Calloway, Cleveland, Taylor Made, ect) would be that much just for a single driver. And you get a whole set and a very nice golf bag & putter.
 

purbeast0

No Lifer
Sep 13, 2001
52,855
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if any you guys are left handed i have a used set i'm going to be ridding of this friday when my new clubs come in if you are interested ... would let em go VERY cheap :).
 

GagHalfrunt

Lifer
Apr 19, 2001
25,297
2,000
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Originally posted by: MisfitsFiend
Thanks! What is the best way to go after my first set of lessons?

I don't feel confident enough to go on a course by myself yet - just get a bucket o'balls and go to a range?

My husband won 9 holes of golf for two - should I see if I can trade it in for more lessons or the driving range, or just go any try the 9 holes?


At this stage it's best to stay off the course for a little while. When you run into water, hills, trees, rough, sand and the other stuff that lines a real golf course you're just going to get frustrated. Until you can hit the ball 100 yards fairly straight and fairly consistently stick to the range and a bucket of balls. It's a lot more fun when you don't have to chase the misses. After you've gotten a little bit better at the range try to find a par 3 course. They're usually easier, flatter and more wide open than real courses and are great for beginners. Work your way up a little at a time. If you were to try taking on a real course now you'd probably just wind up hating the game in an hour or two.
 

habib89

Diamond Member
Jan 17, 2001
3,599
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i'd go with something cheap like the one posted above.. i dont' see the point in starting otu with super expensive clubs, unless you have money burning a hole in your pocket, or want to keep up some sorta image..
 

BEL6772

Senior member
Oct 26, 2004
225
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My story is from many years ago, but:

When I was a sophomore in HS, I went to a local shop and got custom fitted. I had been playing on borrowed clubs for some time, so I had a basic swing that the club maker looked at when selecting shaft flex etc. He built me a set for $20 per club. He used Tour Model II heads, which are a basic cavity back, "no-name" design.

I still have that set and play with it regularly. I haven't played enough to get good enough to justify a more expensive set.

My recommendation (based on my experience) is to find a local shop that makes you feel comfortable and is willing to look at your swing and explain their recommendations to you. Your first set should be good quality in case you find yourself still playing them 15 years down the road, but they shouldn't be an expensive name-brand set in case your skill improves to the point that you're ready for a new, higher performance set in a few years.

You should be looking for a cavity back design for the irons. By moving the 'meat' of the club head to the outer edges, the club is more forgiving of off-center hits. The trade-off is that once you're good enough to start trying to intentionally curve your shots in flight, the cavity back is harder to work with.

Good luck! I hope you enjoy the game for years to come!
 

Slvrtg277

Golden Member
Sep 9, 2004
1,004
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Originally posted by: GagHalfrunt
Originally posted by: MisfitsFiend
Thanks! What is the best way to go after my first set of lessons?

I don't feel confident enough to go on a course by myself yet - just get a bucket o'balls and go to a range?

My husband won 9 holes of golf for two - should I see if I can trade it in for more lessons or the driving range, or just go any try the 9 holes?


At this stage it's best to stay off the course for a little while. When you run into water, hills, trees, rough, sand and the other stuff that lines a real golf course you're just going to get frustrated. Until you can hit the ball 100 yards fairly straight and fairly consistently stick to the range and a bucket of balls. It's a lot more fun when you don't have to chase the misses. After you've gotten a little bit better at the range try to find a par 3 course. They're usually easier, flatter and more wide open than real courses and are great for beginners. Work your way up a little at a time. If you were to try taking on a real course now you'd probably just wind up hating the game in an hour or two.


Or you could do what I did and get in on a 4 man scramble with some friends who aren't as new to the activity as you are. Then you just play "best ball" and if you lose one, oh well.
 

Uppsala9496

Diamond Member
Nov 2, 2001
5,272
19
81
Originally posted by: purbeast0
i would recommend to atleast get steel shafted irons in regular flex for a beginner.

also, if you aren't hung up on brand name, check out http://www.lowprogolf.com . I recently made the switch from OEM golf clubs to component golf clubs. it saves you TONS in $$$ and lets you get the club built PERFECTLY to your specs, and the clubs are just as good (if not better) than brand name OEM clubs. I just got a new full set of irons for $220 from that site, but that was also me picking a shaft that I wanted. You can get built sets about $100 cheaper than that from the site.

if you go there, ask for Bryant. he will do you wonders. he put together a GREAT driver for me and now, 3 weeks later, had me ordering a full set of irons from him. Also, you will get %10 off if you mention the forums over at http://www.freegolfinfo.com (another GREAT site for golf information).

This is the way to go. Bryant makes excellent clubs and knows his sh!t!
 

GagHalfrunt

Lifer
Apr 19, 2001
25,297
2,000
126
Originally posted by: Uppsala9496
Originally posted by: purbeast0
i would recommend to atleast get steel shafted irons in regular flex for a beginner.

also, if you aren't hung up on brand name, check out http://www.lowprogolf.com . I recently made the switch from OEM golf clubs to component golf clubs. it saves you TONS in $$$ and lets you get the club built PERFECTLY to your specs, and the clubs are just as good (if not better) than brand name OEM clubs. I just got a new full set of irons for $220 from that site, but that was also me picking a shaft that I wanted. You can get built sets about $100 cheaper than that from the site.

if you go there, ask for Bryant. he will do you wonders. he put together a GREAT driver for me and now, 3 weeks later, had me ordering a full set of irons from him. Also, you will get %10 off if you mention the forums over at http://www.freegolfinfo.com (another GREAT site for golf information).

This is the way to go. Bryant makes excellent clubs and knows his sh!t!


BAD idea at this stage. Yep, LowPro is great and Bryant knows his stuff, but he's not a psychic or a mindreader. If I call Bryant and say "I need a 450CC driver head handpicked to 9.7* loft with a slightly open face and a tip-stiff 85 gram shaft at 264CPM he can build it. But if I say "I'm new to the game, make me a set of clubs that fits" he can't. You can't buy shoes online without knowing your size, the salesman can't guess at it from 3000 miles away. It's the same with golf, clubs are not one-size-fits-all. Getting properly fit is a hands-on experience. The fitter needs to see you swing, get you on a launch monitor and experiment with different flexes and lie angles to find what fits perfectly. You should not order clubs online unless you're sure of the exact specs you need, most beginners don't.
 

Uppsala9496

Diamond Member
Nov 2, 2001
5,272
19
81
All you have to do is go get fit somewhere and then can call him. He can build to your specs. Anyone who actually gets clubs without being properly fit is just pissing away money. I made the assumption that the person in question would get fit.
He's done it for me with 3 drivers and each one is exactly what I've expected (with the exception of one of the shafts playing less stout than I thought it would).
 

purbeast0

No Lifer
Sep 13, 2001
52,855
5,727
126
Originally posted by: GagHalfrunt
Originally posted by: Uppsala9496
Originally posted by: purbeast0
i would recommend to atleast get steel shafted irons in regular flex for a beginner.

also, if you aren't hung up on brand name, check out http://www.lowprogolf.com . I recently made the switch from OEM golf clubs to component golf clubs. it saves you TONS in $$$ and lets you get the club built PERFECTLY to your specs, and the clubs are just as good (if not better) than brand name OEM clubs. I just got a new full set of irons for $220 from that site, but that was also me picking a shaft that I wanted. You can get built sets about $100 cheaper than that from the site.

if you go there, ask for Bryant. he will do you wonders. he put together a GREAT driver for me and now, 3 weeks later, had me ordering a full set of irons from him. Also, you will get %10 off if you mention the forums over at http://www.freegolfinfo.com (another GREAT site for golf information).

This is the way to go. Bryant makes excellent clubs and knows his sh!t!


BAD idea at this stage. Yep, LowPro is great and Bryant knows his stuff, but he's not a psychic or a mindreader. If I call Bryant and say "I need a 450CC driver head handpicked to 9.7* loft with a slightly open face and a tip-stiff 85 gram shaft at 264CPM he can build it. But if I say "I'm new to the game, make me a set of clubs that fits" he can't. You can't buy shoes online without knowing your size, the salesman can't guess at it from 3000 miles away. It's the same with golf, clubs are not one-size-fits-all. Getting properly fit is a hands-on experience. The fitter needs to see you swing, get you on a launch monitor and experiment with different flexes and lie angles to find what fits perfectly. You should not order clubs online unless you're sure of the exact specs you need, most beginners don't.

yes, but you could STILL probably get a beginner set cheaper from Bryant than just going to the store and getting them at a B&M store. and yes, bryant could match you better up, over the phone, than someone could do at a sports authority. He has a form on his website that you can fill out to give the physical aspects to fit you.

of course it won't be as good as going to get personally fitted for clubs in person and go on a launch monitor. however, i don't think he's trying to break the bank on his beginner set of clubs. if he goes to a real golf store to get beginner clubs, they will set him up with stuff that is $400+ most likely, and a fitment fee on top of that if its not included in the price.