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Speculation: Intel unlocked 2C/4T?

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cbn

Lifer
Mar 27, 2009
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I don't doubt that you could earn more revenue from a CPU by allowing cores to be re-enabled, since all that would be required is to charge more than the difference between the initial retail prices of each variant. However, that solution impacts upon future sales, with a consequence of reduced long term revenue.
If a person buys a new PC in order to obtain increased CPU performance Intel only gets a portion of the money spent.

And if a person buys a used CPU to upgrade their PC Intel gets none of the money spent.

In contrast, With a software upgrade Intel gets 100% of the money spent.

So from Intel's standpoint I don't see why they would be against it.
 
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PotatoWithEarsOnSide

Senior member
Feb 23, 2017
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Selling a $500 CPU for $200, just because it has been 'disabled', and then charging $200 per 'enablement' etc is what you're effectively suggesting. Better to just sell it at $500 in the first instance.
 

cbn

Lifer
Mar 27, 2009
12,968
221
106
Selling a $500 CPU for $200, just because it has been 'disabled', and then charging $200 per 'enablement' etc is what you're effectively suggesting. Better to just sell it at $500 in the first instance.
Intel will never be able to predict demand exactly.

So Intel has to decide on whether to make too many $500 CPUs (out of the good dies) and then risk the inventory being slow moving vs. not enough $500 CPUs and then having retailer price gouge.

With that mentioned, I think if Intel had an unlocked 2C/4T (software unlockable to 4C or 6C based on the soldered 8C die*) it would benefit DIY motherboard, memory, PSU, enclosure, etc. For example think of how many people would rather buy entry level Z370/Z390 over a lower chipset if they could not only overclock the 2C/4T but software unlock to some higher core count as well. Likewise how many people would choose a better, nicer, higher flowing $50 uATX case over a entry level uATX case if they had such a CPU? Same goes for high frequency DDR4, Optane and to a lesser extent PSU and cooling.


*Could also be based on the 6C die.
 
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