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Someone HELP Me With My Friends Resume...

FettsBabe

Diamond Member
Oct 21, 1999
3,708
0
0
She graduated last night, and needs a resume.

She's been a waitress...can someone help me spruce up that job.

Also, she wants to be a pediatrician, can someone help me write a cool objective.

I've always done legal resumes so I'm not sure where I should start at with her's :( I need to get it done today.

 

guyver01

Lifer
Sep 25, 2000
22,151
4
61


<<

She's been a waitress...can someone help me spruce up that job.

>>



you could put something like 'worked in service industry servicing hundreds of clients

:Q

er... uhn.... or mebbe not
 

BDawg

Lifer
Oct 31, 2000
11,631
2
0
So she wants to go directly from waitress to pediatrician? Isn't that a big leap?

Did she just graduate from high school or college, or med school?
 

Keribeth

Senior member
Mar 28, 2001
441
1
0
experience with customer relations. Works in fast paced, high stress environment.

objective - short and sweet...

To obtain employment in the medical feild that will provide experience necessary to work as a pediatrician.

hows that?:)
 

FettsBabe

Diamond Member
Oct 21, 1999
3,708
0
0
dawg, her long term goal is to be a pediatrician. She will attend college this fall to work on her four-year bachelors degree.

Keri, great objective. WOOHOO, cut and paste!!!!

She also worked as a cashier at Food Lion. I like the worked in high stress environment for that!!!
 

WordSmith2000

Banned
May 4, 2001
328
0
0


<< To obtain employment in the medical feild that will provide experience necessary to work as a pediatrician. >>



NONONO!

Geese, does ANYBODY use the search feature here???@!@

First of all, you tell an employer what you want to do for THEM, not what you want THEM to do for you. That would be like me putting as my objective:


<< To obtain employment at a firm that uses XML technology so I can get a better job using the XML skills I learn. >>



An employer hires people for two reasons:
1) to make them money
2) to save them time and/or money

Everything in the resume has to be geared toward this goal, unless you are trying to get into Greenpeace or something as a grunt laborer.

Fetts: Interview the girl. Ask her about her affiliations, charity work, anything that might pertain to helping people or handling stress. Build the resume around those things. But you must always show that the person behind the resume will bring some kind of value to the potential employer.

Oh, and spell check the stuff you cut and paste. You have to make sure all the feeleds are correct.
 

Rio Rebel

Administrator Emeritus<br>Elite Member
Oct 9, 1999
5,194
0
0
I hate resumes. It's like college football - either play the game dishonestly like everyone else, or stand by the wayside.

That being said, here's a few tips that have helped me:

The days of the old &quot;last three jobs, education, and references&quot; are gone. Today's resume has to be a precise arrangement of flashy yet direct statements. Exagerrate beyond belief. The meek may inherit the earth, but they don't stand a chance at landing the job.

But the best foot forward. If there is little experience, DON'T lead with your recent work history - lead with your skills. If you have tons of experience but little formal education, hammer in the experience at the beginning, and make the positive impression before they ever get to the part about your educational background.

Many people will tell you that it's best to list accomplishments instead of responsibilities. I agree to a point, but don't use all your space listing irrelevant accomplishments just to follow that model. If you worked as a waiter, emphasize your organization and ability to produce under pressure - don't try to manufacturer some statistical accomplishment if it's not appropriate.

References: I was telling a good friend last night that references are the most overrated aspect of an application (job, grad school, whatever.) References almost NEVER get you a job - but they often COST you a job. Unless that person actually makes a contact and helps you get your foot in the door, your references are not going to get you an interview over someone else. Remember first and foremost that it's much, much better to get a stellar reference from an unknown professor or boss than a mediocre reference from someone famous or highly-titled. I'll take the raving comments from my philosophy professor over some friendly but ambiguous lines from the Chancellor ANY DAY OF THE WEEK.

I'm not an out-and-out expert, but I did spend three years recruiting, analyzing, and selecting participants for a teaching/graduate program. Situations can always be different, but these tips above are pretty solid.
 

BDawg

Lifer
Oct 31, 2000
11,631
2
0
What is she trying to do this summer? Does she need a resume? I didn't need one for my summer jobs before college.

Maybe she could get an internship at a vet, or do volunteer work for the hospital?
 

happykitten

Golden Member
Feb 6, 2001
1,364
0
0


<< I've always done legal resumes so I'm not sure where I should start at with her's >>



Nice of you to do it for her, but why can't she do it herself?

Writes her own resume,
~kitten >^.^<
 

Keribeth

Senior member
Mar 28, 2001
441
1
0
wordsmith how many resumes have you written. this objective is perfectly acceptable. minus spelling. I have had to write many and sit through endless classes geared only to writing a resume. After going through these and having my own critiqued by many professionals I have come to understand that different epople are looking for different things.
The objective should outline what you expect to take from the job being applied for. Save what you can give the company for the interview. I think this is especially appropriate for an entry-level position.

<---also writes her own resume:D
 

FettsBabe

Diamond Member
Oct 21, 1999
3,708
0
0
Kitten, She can't do it herself. She doesn't have a computer, and she just graduated high school, and has no idea at how to produce a quality resume.

Rio, your comments are very precise and correct...

While she has no real medical experience, I led off the cover letter with her ability to thrive in a fast paced team environment, and also noted on eagerness to learn medical facility procedures.

Dawg, She wants to work in a nursing home or medical facility. Most of the facilities require or prefer resumes. She will probably attend the first year of college at night, and transfer to day her 2nd year. This allows her to get the basic requirements out of the way and save money while working.

 

cyclistca

Platinum Member
Dec 5, 2000
2,886
11
81
Two works functional resume. You don't want to use a chronological one. A functional resume allows you to highlight you skill set and the projects you have worked one. To get more info do a lookup on you favourite search engine.
 

WordSmith2000

Banned
May 4, 2001
328
0
0
Keri:
Hundreds. I used to make 50 bucks an hour writing resumes. In college, I paid a good part of my tuition creating them for the outgoing seniors.

I also hired a lot of people over the years, and could tell which persons were coming on board to gain experience for the next job and which ones actually wanted a career with the company.
If you work in an HR department, you will see a lot of resumes that have that kind of objective. Resumes that detail the value of the applicant tend to rise to the top after a while.

Nowadays, you have to put your strongest foot forward, or you will not even get to the interview.



<< The objective should outline what you expect to take from the job being applied for. >>



Sorry, but when I was hiring, that kind of objective would have rejected your resume in the first 10 seconds after reading it. When you are looking for a job, you need to expect the company to pay you for the work you produce. First and foremost, companies do NOT want to train you for your next job. They want to keep you until you are no longer making them money, or saving them time and money in comparison to your salary.

Even in entry-level jobs, the applicant must understand that they are providing a service (their work) for a return (the paycheck). If you are applying for volunteer work, you may be able to get away with that kind of objective, but I would not recommend that you try that in the &quot;real&quot; world.
 

Rio Rebel

Administrator Emeritus<br>Elite Member
Oct 9, 1999
5,194
0
0
I tend to agree with Wordsmith on that one.

An objective may sound like it's telling a company what you want from them, but that's not why the company looks for an objective. The company is trying to get you to describe the type of job you are looking for, so they can weed you out if your experience and goals don't fit their position.

There are exceptions to this rule, but you can usually go on the assumption that the HR person is not digging for gems, they are eliminating wasted time and paper. The model that usually takes place is they get a stack of resumes in response to an advertised position, and they start cutting and slicing from there. So your goal is NOT to start negotiating and informing them of your needs from the start - it's to GET THAT INTERVIEW.

The job application process is a constant battle between YOU, who wants to keep all options open and get face to face with the employer, and the EMPLOYER, who wants to get to the &quot;real&quot; candidates as quickly and efficiently as possible, without going on wild goose chases with applicants who don't meet the requirements. If it's a job you're really interested in, every word and every phrase should be geared toward selling yourself to the company and convincing them that you meet their needs. There's plenty of time to talk about YOUR needs when you get close to an offer.
 

FettsBabe

Diamond Member
Oct 21, 1999
3,708
0
0
Thanks for all the help. I've completed the cover letter and resume. I'm gonna help her find good leads tonight, so she can mail them out tomorrow. :):) You guys are the greatest.
 

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