Setting up VNC behind a router?

BlueWeasel

Lifer
Jun 2, 2000
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I've got a US Robotics USR8000 router at home that I use with my cable connection. Previously, I just had my cable modem connected to a second NIC in my computer, so running VNC from work to my home system was easy.

Now since I've gotten the router, I'm a little confused on if it supports VNC and if so, what settings I need to change on the router. I did a little searching on the USR website, and while it's a little vague, I think the settings are going to fall under the 'Special Applications' (under Advanced Settings of the router).

USR8000 Manual
Special Applications of the USR8000 Router

Apparently, the router does support VNC, so is the 'Special Applications' section seem right. Also, I know that I need to enable/forward port 5900 for VNC, but I'm still not sure how to do this. :)

 

InlineFive

Diamond Member
Sep 20, 2003
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Forward Port 5900 to the internal IP address of the computer you want to be the VNC server.

:)
 

BlueWeasel

Lifer
Jun 2, 2000
15,940
474
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Originally posted by: PorBleemo
Forward Port 5900 to the internal IP address of the computer you want to be the VNC server.

:)

OK, let's assume this:

IP address of computer assigned by the router: 192.168.xxx.yyy
Dynamic IP address assigned by ISP: aaa.bbb.ccc.ddd

I need to forward port 5900 to IP 192.168.xxx.yyy in the router settings. Then, to access the VNC server on my home machine, the Ultra VNC client needs to point to aaa.bbb.ccc.ddd:5900.

Correct?
 

InlineFive

Diamond Member
Sep 20, 2003
9,599
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Originally posted by: BlueWeasel
Originally posted by: PorBleemo
Forward Port 5900 to the internal IP address of the computer you want to be the VNC server.

:)

OK, let's assume this:

IP address of computer assigned by the router: 192.168.xxx.yyy
Dynamic IP address assigned by ISP: aaa.bbb.ccc.ddd

I need to forward port 5900 to IP 192.168.xxx.yyy in the router settings. Then, to access the VNC server on my home machine, the Ultra VNC client needs to point to aaa.bbb.ccc.ddd:5900.

Correct?

Correct! :) But you probably don't need the ":5900" on the end of the WAN IP since the program should try it automatically.
 

BlueWeasel

Lifer
Jun 2, 2000
15,940
474
126
Awesome! Thanks for the help PorBleemo :cookie: :beer:

Now, I've got a similar question for setting up VNC access through the router at work. We have a small LAN here with DSL and a D-Link router. VNC is already setup on the router using port forwarding.

The question that we will have 3 engineers who would need to VNC into their own personal workstations. What needs to be done so that they can connect to only their specific machines? Each of the three workstations is assigned an IP address by the router.

Basically, they only need to be able to access our LAN to transfer files back and forth from home. I know that VNC has transfer capabilities, but would there be a better way to go?
 

TechnoPro

Golden Member
Jul 10, 2003
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0
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Originally posted by: PorBleemo
Originally posted by: BlueWeasel
Originally posted by: PorBleemo
Forward Port 5900 to the internal IP address of the computer you want to be the VNC server.

:)

OK, let's assume this:

IP address of computer assigned by the router: 192.168.xxx.yyy
Dynamic IP address assigned by ISP: aaa.bbb.ccc.ddd

I need to forward port 5900 to IP 192.168.xxx.yyy in the router settings. Then, to access the VNC server on my home machine, the Ultra VNC client needs to point to aaa.bbb.ccc.ddd:5900.

Correct?

Correct! :) But you probably don't need the ":5900" on the end of the WAN IP since the program should try it automatically.

If you are using the VNC client, then you do not need to specify port 5900. If, however, you use a web browser to access your PC remotely, then yes, you do: http://a.b.c.d:5800 (<- not a typo, it is 5800).