Seriously consider moving to Linux

mxnerd

Diamond Member
Jul 6, 2007
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Used to test Linux in VM only (on SSD) for a long time. For the past week I finally install Q4OS Linux (TDE or KDE desktop) on SSD and use it as host machine. TDE -- Trinity Desktop Environment is XP like.

Found it extremely smooth, no tons of crap processes running in the background as Windows 10. Virtual environment KVM is almost as good as VMwarre Workstation.
 
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Goober13

Junior Member
Aug 8, 2023
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Used to test Linux in VM only (on SSD) for a long time. For the past week I finally install Q4OS Linux (TDE or KDE desktop) on SSD and use it as host machine. TDE -- Trinity Desktop Environment is XP like.

Found it extremely smooth, no tons of crap processes running in the background as Windows 10. Virtual environment KVM is almost as good as VMwarre Workstation.
I have Q4OS running on a 13 year old latop with 4GB ram. I have yet to see it go above 1Gb ram, but i don't use that laptop much, It was more of an experiment than anything else.
Q4OS is definitely one of the lightest distros out there!
 
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Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
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I find the best way to make the plunge is to keep your windows drive intact, put in another drive and install Linux on it and dual boot. Don't try to dual boot on same HDD, if you don't do it right you'll trash your windows install when you resize the partition to make room for Lunux, ask how I know. :p The easiest is to make Linux the primary and Windows the secondary. Grub will handle the dual booting process.

Once you are used to Linux being your daily driver you might find yourself needing windows for certain things but it will get annoying to have to reboot your Linux one if you're in middle of something so I find having a KVM and having a dedicated windows box is the best way at least for me.
 
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mikeymikec

Lifer
May 19, 2011
16,879
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I've been dual-booting since 2018 IIRC, nowadays running Linux Mint 21.x as my primary OS and I'm happy with it.

One thing that really surprises me is that if I'm monitoring processor usage in Windows, it's a matter of routine to see unexpected and sustained CPU usage caused by Windows background activity for whatever reason, and I've basically never seen this happen in Linux. I wonder what kind of power usage difference would be noted between two hardware-identical systems being used for the same average user tasks over say a week.

Aside from that, one other thing I like about for example Linux Mint is that it's very rare for me to be interacting with a particular window and for something else to steal the focus. That always bugged me about Windows, where I've found it to be probably a daily occurrence and MS's only partial solution is the notifications system and silencing it which isn't particularly desirable either (since it also silences "you can now safely disconnect this USB device" for example).
 
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