See if you can get this Maths Question right

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Kyteland

Diamond Member
Dec 30, 2002
5,747
1
81
The answer is $97 folks. There are 3 people involved and it is a closed system. No money is added or lost to it.

The second shopkeeper comes out of the deal with no change. He didn't gain or lose any money.
The customer comes out of the deal +$18 item +$79 in change -$0 counterfit bill for a net gain of $97

$0+$97+$x = 0

Solve for x and the guy lost $97
 

firefaux

Banned
May 5, 2005
105
0
0
its a trick question. the real answer is that mr. anderson goes mad with rage and goes on a rampage. he hunts down mr.brown and tortures him for two weeks before killing him. before he dies, mr. brown tells mr. anderson his secret swiss bank account number, where he had been hiding all of his nazi gold that he bought with his counterfit money scheme. mr. anderson sells the gold and makes a profit of 200 million $$. or if you want a pussy answer, i got 97$
 

nwfsnake

Senior member
Feb 28, 2003
697
0
0
Mr Brown (Customer) - Came into store with essentially nothing, Left with $79 and product selling for $21, costing Mr Anderson $18. Netted at least $97, maybe $100.

Mr Anderson (Shopkeeper) - Gave away product which cost him $18 (retailed for $21),
gave Mr Brown $79 in change, gave neighbor shopkeeper $100, received $100 from neighbor shopkeeper.

Neighbor Shopkeeper - Gave Mr Anderson $100, got $100 back eventually.

Soooo, Mr Anderson lost the $79 in change, the $100 he had to give to neighbor shopkeeper, and the product (your choice is it $18 or $21).

$100 + $79 + $18 - $100 = $97
$100 + $79 + $21 - $100= $100

Lets average and call it $98.50!

This make the other side happy! ;)
 

Glavinsolo

Platinum Member
Sep 2, 2004
2,946
0
0
Originally posted by: AnnihilatorX
It's said 9 out of 10 uni students get this wrong
Don't spoil if you have came across this:

Mr. Anderson is a shopkeeper at a local town. He was selling a product to Mr. Brown. The product has a marked price of $21 while the cost price of it is $18. Mr. Brown decided to buy it with his $100 note. Unfortunately Mr. Anderson ran out of change. He swapped the $100 bank note for some change in a neigbour shop. He gave the Mr. Brown the correct change and Mr. Brown left.

Soon the neighbour shopkeeper realised the banknote is a counterfiet. Our Mr. Anderson had no choice but to pay his neigbour $100.

How much in total had our poor Mr. Anderson lose?

*Marked price - The price tag of the product to customers
*Cost price - The per unit cost of the product bought from the wholeseller to the shop

Corrected. Lol sorry apparently I didn't proof read my writing. Sorry for the confustion :/


Shopkeeper paid:

$100 to Neighbor (Justify the mistake of the counterfeit)
$79 to Conterfeiter (Brown gets clean $79)
$18 loss of product (Product)

=$197

 

Amused

Elite Member
Apr 14, 2001
55,793
13,754
146
Originally posted by: Kyteland
The answer is $97 folks. There are 3 people involved and it is a closed system. No money is added or lost to it.

The second shopkeeper comes out of the deal with no change. He didn't gain or lose any money.
The customer comes out of the deal +$18 item +$79 in change -$0 counterfit bill for a net gain of $97

$0+$97+$x = 0

Solve for x and the guy lost $97

As a business owner, I would say $100. Lost profit is still a loss.

But I admit, the question is too vague, so I would settle for my previous answer of:

Quite simply, if you count his lost profits, he's out $100. If you don't, he's out $97.
 

royaldank

Diamond Member
Apr 19, 2001
5,440
0
0
If it makes it easier for folks, just forget about the $100. Forget it. It doesn't exist. Forget about the "neighbor" as well since that is the same thing as this guy's cash register.

$100 if he would have sold it legititmately. $97 if that item would have never been sold to anyone.
 

MobiusPizza

Platinum Member
Apr 23, 2004
2,001
0
0
Originally posted by: huesmann
I guess British people can't write English either.


My bad my bad. My ethic origin is not British. English is my second language so sorry for the hassle. I am living in UK that's why I said that
 

BurnItDwn

Lifer
Oct 10, 1999
26,059
1,541
126
It is impossible for him to have lost more than "$100" since that was the total amount of mony involved in the transactions.
He lost whatever he gave in change + the cost or price of the product (take your pick) ...

He did not lose any other money.
All you who are saying > 100 are completely wrong.
 

xospec1alk

Diamond Member
Mar 4, 2002
4,329
0
0
Originally posted by: Glavinsolo
Originally posted by: AnnihilatorX
It's said 9 out of 10 uni students get this wrong
Don't spoil if you have came across this:

Mr. Anderson is a shopkeeper at a local town. He was selling a product to Mr. Brown. The product has a marked price of $21 while the cost price of it is $18. Mr. Brown decided to buy it with his $100 note. Unfortunately Mr. Anderson ran out of change. He swapped the $100 bank note for some change in a neigbour shop. He gave the Mr. Brown the correct change and Mr. Brown left.

Soon the neighbour shopkeeper realised the banknote is a counterfiet. Our Mr. Anderson had no choice but to pay his neigbour $100.

How much in total had our poor Mr. Anderson lose?

*Marked price - The price tag of the product to customers
*Cost price - The per unit cost of the product bought from the wholeseller to the shop

Corrected. Lol sorry apparently I didn't proof read my writing. Sorry for the confustion :/


Shopkeeper paid:

$100 to Neighbor (Justify the mistake of the counterfeit)
$79 to Conterfeiter (Brown gets clean $79)
$18 loss of product (Product)

=$197


the $79 bucks came from the original counterfeit that the customer gave him...

its like the customer asking the neighbor for $100 in change
 

silverpig

Lifer
Jul 29, 2001
27,709
11
81
Originally posted by: Glavinsolo
Originally posted by: AnnihilatorX
It's said 9 out of 10 uni students get this wrong
Don't spoil if you have came across this:

Mr. Anderson is a shopkeeper at a local town. He was selling a product to Mr. Brown. The product has a marked price of $21 while the cost price of it is $18. Mr. Brown decided to buy it with his $100 note. Unfortunately Mr. Anderson ran out of change. He swapped the $100 bank note for some change in a neigbour shop. He gave the Mr. Brown the correct change and Mr. Brown left.

Soon the neighbour shopkeeper realised the banknote is a counterfiet. Our Mr. Anderson had no choice but to pay his neigbour $100.

How much in total had our poor Mr. Anderson lose?

*Marked price - The price tag of the product to customers
*Cost price - The per unit cost of the product bought from the wholeseller to the shop

Corrected. Lol sorry apparently I didn't proof read my writing. Sorry for the confustion :/


Shopkeeper paid:

$100 to Neighbor (Justify the mistake of the counterfeit)
$79 to Conterfeiter (Brown gets clean $79)
$18 loss of product (Product)

=$197

Shopkeeper received

$100 counterfeit bill = $0
$100 in change from shopkeeper #2 = $100

-$197 + $100 = -$97
 

Amused

Elite Member
Apr 14, 2001
55,793
13,754
146
Originally posted by: Glavinsolo


Shopkeeper paid:

$100 to Neighbor (Justify the mistake of the counterfeit)
$79 to Conterfeiter (Brown gets clean $79)
$18 loss of product (Product)

=$197

I'm still trying to figure out where you people are coming up with an extra $100.

The change he handed the man was his neighrbors money. He simply owes his neighbor $100. He lost nothing of his own except an $18 item, but he kept $21 of his neighbor's money.

That makes $97 he's out. $100 if you count his lost profit as a loss as well (I would).
 

mordantmonkey

Diamond Member
Dec 23, 2004
3,075
5
0
how can people get this so wrong?
$97 or $100 depending if you consider the "lost profit" i.e if it was the last item, someone came in to buy it, and went somewhere else instead.
edit: if he ordered the item again before someone came in to buy it then he would not have "lost profit" but would be out a certain amount of time...stocking, selling, etc.
 

DrPizza

Administrator Elite Member Goat Whisperer
Mar 5, 2001
49,606
166
111
www.slatebrookfarm.com
Two explanations:

Starting at 0 in drawer.

Receives counterfeit bill (debt to be paid later)
+$100 = total of $100 in drawer.
gives counterfeit bill to neighbor, now $0 in drawer
Receives $100 in change from neighbor. Now, $100 in drawer.
Gives man $18 in product. (Let's say that he pays his cost when the item is sold - owes the manufacturer $18 now) Still, $100 in drawer.
Gives man $79 in change. Now, $21 in drawer.
Neighbor returns, demands $100 for the counterfeit bill.
Borrows $100 from wife to pay the neighbor.

So, he started with 0 in the drawer.
Now:
positive $21 in drawer.
owes wife $100
Owes product manufacturer $18.

+21 -100 -18 = lost $97.



Method #2 (so we don't go negative.)

Starts with $500 in drawer. (unfortunately too large of bills to make change)
Receives counterfeit $100, now $600 in drawer.
Goes to neighbor, does the exchange, still $600 in drawer.
Toothfairy comes, exchanges small bills for the large bills in the drawer so the guy is capable of the next step.... still $600 in drawer.
Gives guy product, takes $18 out of drawer to pay the manufacturer (think of it as selling on consignment... he doesn't have to deduct the cost until after the sale. )
Now has $582 in drawer.
Gives $79 in change. Now has $503 in drawer.
Neighbor returns. "Gimme back my $100 or I'm calling the secret service!"
Gives neighbor $100. Now, $403 in drawer.

He's out $97.

 

Glavinsolo

Platinum Member
Sep 2, 2004
2,946
0
0
Originally posted by: Amused
Originally posted by: Glavinsolo


Shopkeeper paid:

$100 to Neighbor (Justify the mistake of the counterfeit)
$79 to Conterfeiter (Brown gets clean $79)
$18 loss of product (Product)

=$197

I'm still trying to figure out where you people are coming up with an extra $100.

The change he handed the man was his neighrbors money. He simply owes his neighbor $100. He lost nothing of his own except an $18 item, but he kept $21 of his neighbor's money.

That makes $97 he's out. $100 if you count his lost profit as a loss as well (I would).

He has to eat the conterfeit bill twice.

Which totals $200

$79 goes to conterfeiter
$100 goes to neigbor

I'm changing my answer to $179
 

royaldank

Diamond Member
Apr 19, 2001
5,440
0
0
This is like the bellhop riddle.

Three guys pay for a $150 room with a $50 bill each. Shopkeeper decides he overcharged $5 and sends it up with the bellboy. He tells the guys and shows them the $5. They decide to each take $1 from the bellboy and let him have the extra $2. So, each guy paid $49 which equals $147. Now, add the $2 the bellboy has in his pocket and that's only $149. Where's the extra dollar.
 

MobiusPizza

Platinum Member
Apr 23, 2004
2,001
0
0
Many people have realised it already and "actively" trying to convince others;

So I'd just put down the official answer.
The official answer is $100 though because -

As BurnItDwn pointed out, losing more than $100 is wrong. The neigbour was just a wash since the neigbour did not gain or lose. The total amount of money involved in the transaction was no more than $100

Firstly; the shopkeeper Mr. Anderson lost his $18 to the buyer Mr. Brown. Mr. Brown paid Mr. Anderson a courtfert $100 note; which equals nothing; Mr. Anderson gave him a change of $79

In this view Mr. Anderson had gained $0-$79-$18 = -$97

However strictly speaking; as royaldank and Amused pointed out;
It depends on what the definition of "lost" in the question is.
He'd have that $3 profit if the product had successfully sold to any customer
Although he physically lost $97; -$100 is what he'd put in his account book

Congradulations to royaldank as the first person realising this.
Thanks everyone for their active participation :D

The swift replies had suprised me
I personally got $197, then changed my mind to $97 when I first tackled this question.
If you view it at an angle like the explanation above, it's pretty simple.
 

mobobuff

Lifer
Apr 5, 2004
11,100
1
81
Originally posted by: royaldank
This is like the bellhop riddle.

Three guys pay for a $150 room with a $50 bill each. Shopkeeper decides he overcharged $5 and sends it up with the bellboy. He tells the guys and shows them the $5. They decide to each take $1 from the bellboy and let him have the extra $2. So, each guy paid $49 which equals $147. Now, add the $2 the bellboy has in his pocket and that's only $149. Where's the extra dollar.

Please don't.
 

Amused

Elite Member
Apr 14, 2001
55,793
13,754
146
Originally posted by: Glavinsolo
Originally posted by: Amused
Originally posted by: Glavinsolo


Shopkeeper paid:

$100 to Neighbor (Justify the mistake of the counterfeit)
$79 to Conterfeiter (Brown gets clean $79)
$18 loss of product (Product)

=$197

I'm still trying to figure out where you people are coming up with an extra $100.

The change he handed the man was his neighrbors money. He simply owes his neighbor $100. He lost nothing of his own except an $18 item, but he kept $21 of his neighbor's money.

That makes $97 he's out. $100 if you count his lost profit as a loss as well (I would).

He has to eat the conterfeit bill twice.

Which totals $200

$79 goes to conterfeiter
$100 goes to neigbor

I'm changing my answer to $179

No, he doesn't. Quite simply, you're wrong.
 

mooncancook

Platinum Member
May 28, 2003
2,874
50
91
hmm let me think again.

He gains $3 total from the sale (21-18). Then he lose $100 to the neighbor for the fake bill. 100-3=97.

So my final answer is $97.