Second time cooking swordfish

Herr Kutz

Platinum Member
Jun 14, 2009
2,398
58
106
#1
...and it turned out quite tasty. Until a week ago, I never realized how quick and easy fish was to cook.



P.S. Paul Prudhomme’s magic salt free seasoning is clutch on pretty much everything.
 
Feb 25, 2011
16,184
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#2
Looks delicious.

Fish is very easy to do a pretty okay job of cooking, and very hard to screw up too bad (staple fish like salmon or tilapia are easy to overcook, but that just tends to make it kinda meh, not terrible. Cod is gross when overcooked, though.)

Seasoning is key.
 

Herr Kutz

Platinum Member
Jun 14, 2009
2,398
58
106
#4
I just realized I’m probably way over the recommended “safe” level of mercury intake. Am I going to die?
 

IBMJunkman

Senior member
May 7, 2015
268
1
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#6
In my youth I would summer in Maine at my grandparents. They had a fish monger that came to the house once a week. A station wagon with the back filled with ice and fish. My mother and grandparents tried to get me to eat swordfish. No go.

25+ years later I was at a co-workers house in Denver for dinner. He did swordfish on the Weber with just lemon and butter. I kicked myself for not trying it all those years earlier.

Screw the mercury. As a kid I played with a ball of it in my palm. I am still here!
 
Jul 13, 2005
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#8
I just realized I’m probably way over the recommended “safe” level of mercury intake. Am I going to die?
dude!! OMG your ass is grass!!

March 2004


EPA-823-R-04-005


2004 EPA and FDA Advice For:
Women Who Might Become Pregnant
Women Who are Pregnant
Nursing Mothers
Young Children


Fish and shellfish are an important part of a healthy diet. Fish and shellfish contain high-quality protein and other essential nutrients, are low in saturated fat, and contain omega-3 fatty acids. A well-balanced diet that includes a variety of fish and shellfish can contribute to heart health and children's proper growth and development. So, women and young children in particular should include fish or shellfish in their diets due to the many nutritional benefits.


However, nearly all fish and shellfish contain traces of mercury. For most people, the risk from mercury by eating fish and shellfish is not a health concern. Yet, some fish and shellfish contain higher levels of mercury that may harm an unborn baby or young child's developing nervous system. The risks from mercury in fish and shellfish depend on the amount of fish and shellfish eaten and the levels of mercury in the fish and shellfish. Therefore, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are advising women who may become pregnant, pregnant women, nursing mothers, and young children to avoid some types of fish and eat fish and shellfish that are lower in mercury.


By following these 3 recommendations for selecting and eating fish or shellfish, women and young children will receive the benefits of eating fish and shellfish and be confident that they have reduced their exposure to the harmful effects of mercury.


1. Do not eat Shark, Swordfish, King Mackerel, or Tilefish because they contain high levels of mercury.


2. Eat up to 12 ounces (2 average meals) a week of a variety of fish and shellfish that are lower in mercury.


  • Five of the most commonly eaten fish that are low in mercury are shrimp, canned light tuna, salmon, pollock, and catfish.
  • Another commonly eaten fish, albacore ("white") tuna has more mercury than canned light tuna. So, when choosing your two meals of fish and shellfish, you may eat up to 6 ounces (one average meal) of albacore tuna per week.

3. Check local advisories about the safety of fish caught by family and friends in your local lakes, rivers, and coastal areas. If no advice is available, eat up to 6 ounces (one average meal) per week of fish you catch from local waters, but don't consume any other fish during that week.


Follow these same recommendations when feeding fish and shellfish to your young child, but serve smaller portions.

Frequently Asked Questions about Mercury in Fish and Shellfish:

  1. "What is mercury and methylmercury?"
    Mercury occurs naturally in the environment and can also be released into the air through industrial pollution. Mercury falls from the air and can accumulate in streams and oceans and is turned into methylmercury in the water. It is this type of mercury that can be harmful to your unborn baby and young child. Fish absorb the methylmercury as they feed in these waters and so it builds up in them. It builds up more in some types of fish and shellfish than others, depending on what the fish eat, which is why the levels vary.
  2. "I'm a woman who could have children but I'm not pregnant - so why should I be concerned about methylmercury?"
    If you regularly eat types of fish that are high in methylmercury, it can accumulate in your blood stream over time. Methylmercury is removed from the body naturally, but it may take over a year for the levels to drop significantly. Thus, it may be present in a woman even before she becomes pregnant. This is the reason why women who are trying to become pregnant should also avoid eating certain types of fish.
  3. "Is there methylmercury in all fish and shellfish?"
    Nearly all fish and shellfish contain traces of methylmercury. However, larger fish that have lived longer have the highest levels of methylmercury because they've had more time to accumulate it. These large fish (swordfish, shark, king mackerel and tilefish) pose the greatest risk. Other types of fish and shellfish may be eaten in the amounts recommended by FDA and EPA.
  4. "I don't see the fish I eat in the advisory. What should I do?"
    If you want more information about the levels in the various types of fish you eat, see the FDA food safety website or the EPA website.
  5. "What about fish sticks and fast food sandwiches?"
    Fish sticks and "fast-food" sandwiches are commonly made from fish that are low in mercury.
  6. "The advice about canned tuna is in the advisory, but what's the advice about tuna steaks?"
    Because tuna steak generally contains higher levels of mercury than canned light tuna, when choosing your two meals of fish and shellfish, you may eat up to 6 ounces (one average meal) of tuna steak per week.
  7. "What if I eat more than the recommended amount of fish and shellfish in a week?"
    One week's consumption of fish does not change the level of methylmercury in the body much at all. If you eat a lot of fish one week, you can cut back for the next week or two. Just make sure you average the recommended amount per week.
  8. "Where do I get information about the safety of fish caught recreationally by family or friends?"
    Before you go fishing, check your Fishing Regulations Booklet for information about recreationally caught fish. You can also contact your local health department for information about local advisories. You need to check local advisories because some kinds of fish and shellfish caught in your local waters may have higher or much lower than average levels of mercury. This depends on the levels of mercury in the water in which the fish are caught. Those fish with much lower levels may be eaten more frequently and in larger amounts.

For further information about the risks of mercury in fish and shellfish call the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's food information line toll-free at 1-888-SAFEFOOD.


For further information about the safety of locally caught fish and shellfish, visit the Environmental Protection Agency's Fish Advisory website.
 
Oct 10, 1999
24,450
227
126
#10
That is Beautiful!

I have 2 little frozen chunks of swordfish I picked up at the store on sale ...

Tempted to pan sear them on cast iron and then toss in the oven for a few mins like with a salmon or a steak.

Gonna git me some Mercury! Mmmm
 

Herr Kutz

Platinum Member
Jun 14, 2009
2,398
58
106
#11
That is Beautiful!

I have 2 little frozen chunks of swordfish I picked up at the store on sale ...

Tempted to pan sear them on cast iron and then toss in the oven for a few mins like with a salmon or a steak.

Gonna git me some Mercury! Mmmm
I've been using the bake-only option for ease of preparing and cleaning. So far it's working well!
 

Zanovar

Platinum Member
Jan 21, 2011
2,657
39
106
#12
Looks delicious indeed.Checks price of swordfish.Looks at frozen cod,hugs frozen cod.
 

Herr Kutz

Platinum Member
Jun 14, 2009
2,398
58
106
#13
Looks delicious indeed.Checks price of swordfish.Looks at frozen cod,hugs frozen cod.
Swordfish steaks are only $8.99/lb at the local Trade Joe's which was much less than I was expecting.
 
Oct 10, 1999
24,450
227
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#14
Swordfish steaks are only $8.99/lb at the local Trade Joe's which was much less than I was expecting.
wow,
I thought it was a bargain when It was on sale for like under $1 per ounce! under $10 a pound is fantastic!
 
Feb 14, 2002
15,798
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#15
Beautiful plating!

I'm not a huge fan of swordfish. I even had it fried and it wasn't that good.
 

Herr Kutz

Platinum Member
Jun 14, 2009
2,398
58
106
#16
Beautiful plating!

I'm not a huge fan of swordfish. I even had it fried and it wasn't that good.
Yeah, it’s not amaze balls, but it’s different. Honestly, catfish tastes better (or at least it can depending on preparation). I made some last week:



Trader joe’s Swordfish comes in packs of two:

 
Feb 14, 2002
15,798
115
126
#17
I like catfish. It's good fried in cornmeal or blackened. But my go to fish is whole red snapper. It's good tasting fish raw or cooked and not that expensive. I like eating the entire fish and not just the filet. Americans seem to be afraid to eat the entire fish for some reason. Give me the head, eyes, eggs, milt, everything.
 

Herr Kutz

Platinum Member
Jun 14, 2009
2,398
58
106
#18
I like catfish. It's good fried in cornmeal or blackened. But my go to fish is whole red snapper. It's good tasting fish raw or cooked and not that expensive. I like eating the entire fish and not just the filet. Americans seem to be afraid to eat the entire fish for some reason. Give me the head, eyes, eggs, milt, everything.
Red snapper you say? Reminds me of a fishing trip I took a while back:





 
Jan 28, 2002
13,750
174
126
#19
I just realized I’m probably way over the recommended “safe” level of mercury intake. Am I going to die?
You might die of shame if you were to research the dismal future of the species, due to unscrupulous techniques used in commercial fishing. :(

Damned research and watching Blue Planet already wrecked my passion for octopus.

At least there will always be calamari.
 

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