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Ryzen 5 1600 Instability

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Burak Canik

Member
Oct 26, 2017
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0
6
Update: After reverting to default optimized settings from BIOS and using the pc "normally" for 2 and a half days, there were no problems. So I left prime95 running a blend test overnight. It ran for 12 hours without any problems as well before I decided it was enough. So it's fairly safe to assume that any prior instabilities were caused by RAM OC. It's at 2133 MHz right now. I'll do some research on RAM OC (SoC voltage etc.) and gradually apply it when I have the time. So thanks for all help folks, much appreciated.
 

Burak Canik

Member
Oct 26, 2017
31
0
6
Yeah it is supported. I took the model number from HWINFO which says F4-3200C14-8GTZKY for each 8GB indiviual memory stick. But the 16 GB memory "kit" I bought is F4-3200C14D-16GTZKY. It is listed in the link you sent. All though why would HWINFO show something different :( I hope Newegg didn't send me the wrong kit.
 

jcwagers

Golden Member
Dec 25, 2000
1,150
12
81
Have you tried running the memory at 2933? i know that it's 3200 mhz ram but even 2933 would be a nice boost over the standard 2133 clock. I know that some 3200 ram wouldn't run at 3200 but ran flawlessly at 2933. I'm sure that's been addressed by updated bios updates and such but it might still be worth a shot. :)
 

Burak Canik

Member
Oct 26, 2017
31
0
6
Yeah when I bought the RAM and came home I immediately tried to run it at 3200. It didn't even boot. So I dialed it back a little to 2400 to get it to boot. Then I upgraded the BIOS from ver 1.2 to ver 1.8. I've been running it on 3200MHz ever since. Then you know what happened etc. I'll try 2933 MHz when I have the time and hopefully it'll work :)
 

bononos

Diamond Member
Aug 21, 2011
3,727
69
91
Yeah it is supported. I took the model number from HWINFO which says F4-3200C14-8GTZKY for each 8GB indiviual memory stick. But the 16 GB memory "kit" I bought is F4-3200C14D-16GTZKY. It is listed in the link you sent. All though why would HWINFO show something different :( I hope Newegg didn't send me the wrong kit.
Try using another utility like cpu-z to confirm the model number. Or contact Newegg or MSI to see if you have the right ram.
 

Burak Canik

Member
Oct 26, 2017
31
0
6
Contacted G-Skill for clarification. I read some posts on their forum similar to this issue. I think the 8gtzky versions are SPD readings whereas 16gtzky is the actual model number of the "kit". But let's see what G-Skill has to say about this. Meanwhile I'm messing around with XMP profiles and NB voltage SoC voltage etc. to make it work with 3200 MHz CL14.
 

IEC

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Jun 10, 2004
14,016
3,815
136
Just use the memory "Try-It" option for 3200 14-14-14-34 and 1.38V-1.40V on the vDIMM voltage and see if you have stability.
 

Burak Canik

Member
Oct 26, 2017
31
0
6
Was just going to ask about that and something else. What should be the procedure when I want to OC both cpu and RAM ? Which one should I OC first ?
 

Burak Canik

Member
Oct 26, 2017
31
0
6
Did a 10 minute OCCT test with default settings (Large data set, test mode: infinite) and there were no errors. I used XMP 2 profile with 3200 MHz CL14 configuration BUT didn't manually tweak any voltages for now. I'll let prime95 run overnight.
 

Burak Canik

Member
Oct 26, 2017
31
0
6
Prime95 ran for 12 hours overnight. No problems. I don't get it, just days ago I couldn't get prime95 to run without crashing/rebooting with exactly the same RAM frequeny and timings.
Tests I ran with XMP 2 profile on my 3200Mhz CL14 RAM OC:
  • 10 consequent test of cinebench (without letting cpu cool down).
  • 10 minutes of OCCT.
  • 12 hours of Prime95.
So does this mean that my RAM OC is stable ?
 

Burak Canik

Member
Oct 26, 2017
31
0
6
Also OC'd CPU "somewhat". 3.6GHz with VCore = 1.2250V. It got 85 C during OCCT (ran for 10 minutes). If it's getting this hot with a mere OC of 3.6 GHz (and voltage isn't high too) I think it's pretty safe to say that I lost silicon lottery "badly". Not that an additional 200-300 MHz would make a big difference. Still it would be nice to OC it just for the fun of it. Anyways back to stock speeds for CPU.
 

dlerious

Senior member
Mar 4, 2004
954
226
116
Contacted G-Skill for clarification. I read some posts on their forum similar to this issue. I think the 8gtzky versions are SPD readings whereas 16gtzky is the actual model number of the "kit". But let's see what G-Skill has to say about this. Meanwhile I'm messing around with XMP profiles and NB voltage SoC voltage etc. to make it work with 3200 MHz CL14.
The D after C14 means 2 sticks (total 16GB) A Q is quad (4 sticks).
 

Reinvented

Senior member
Oct 5, 2005
489
77
91
Also OC'd CPU "somewhat". 3.6GHz with VCore = 1.2250V. It got 85 C during OCCT (ran for 10 minutes). If it's getting this hot with a mere OC of 3.6 GHz (and voltage isn't high too) I think it's pretty safe to say that I lost silicon lottery "badly". Not that an additional 200-300 MHz would make a big difference. Still it would be nice to OC it just for the fun of it. Anyways back to stock speeds for CPU.
You can't be serious right? You're expecting to overclock on a stock cooler? Get a better cooler, and watch your stability increase.
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
51,943
6,889
126
You can't be serious right? You're expecting to overclock on a stock cooler? Get a better cooler, and watch your stability increase.
While this is true, the stock cooler is 95W, and the CPU 65W, so there is headroom to OC on the stock cooler. I've got two of my R5 1600 rigs @ 3.80Ghz, one is under 120mm water AIO (MasterLiquid Lite, it was like $40 for an AIO, LOL), and the other (with better case airflow) on the stock cooler, also at 3.80Ghz.

If I were doing OCCT 24/7, basically, any serious DC work, then yes, you NEED a better cooler, or a 240mm or better AIO WC. In fact, I tried running the WC R5 1600 doing DC for a few days @ 3.80Ghz, and it was getting too hot (85C). So I backed it off to stock.

So, in short, if you are running REALLY HEAVY loads on the CPU, and want to OC, then yes, you NEED a better cooler.

If you are running lighter loads, and want to OC (gaming), then you can use the stock cooler, up to around 1.350V / 3.80Ghz.
 

Reinvented

Senior member
Oct 5, 2005
489
77
91
While this is true, the stock cooler is 95W, and the CPU 65W, so there is headroom to OC on the stock cooler. I've got two of my R5 1600 rigs @ 3.80Ghz, one is under 120mm water AIO (MasterLiquid Lite, it was like $40 for an AIO, LOL), and the other (with better case airflow) on the stock cooler, also at 3.80Ghz.

If I were doing OCCT 24/7, basically, any serious DC work, then yes, you NEED a better cooler, or a 240mm or better AIO WC. In fact, I tried running the WC R5 1600 doing DC for a few days @ 3.80Ghz, and it was getting too hot (85C). So I backed it off to stock.

So, in short, if you are running REALLY HEAVY loads on the CPU, and want to OC, then yes, you NEED a better cooler.

If you are running lighter loads, and want to OC (gaming), then you can use the stock cooler, up to around 1.350V / 3.80Ghz.
That 95W TDP goes right out the window once you overclock any amount, and you know that.
 

jcwagers

Golden Member
Dec 25, 2000
1,150
12
81
That 95W TDP goes right out the window once you overclock any amount, and you know that.
Then don't take his word for it. This guy , Tech Deals https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCss3QxegBkF8BAetIo0qXA states in many of his videos that the stock cooler is good up to 3.7 ghz and anything over that he recommends aftermarket or watercooling. Since he has plenty of experience, I see no reason why he would lie about it. He seems like an honest, upfront kind of guy. Check him out and see what you think. If you disagree, that's fine. Everybody has their own opinion. :)
 

Reinvented

Senior member
Oct 5, 2005
489
77
91
Then don't take his word for it. This guy , Tech Deals https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCss3QxegBkF8BAetIo0qXA states in many of his videos that the stock cooler is good up to 3.7 ghz and anything over that he recommends aftermarket or watercooling. Since he has plenty of experience, I see no reason why he would lie about it. He seems like an honest, upfront kind of guy. Check him out and see what you think. If you disagree, that's fine. Everybody has their own opinion. :)
That's cool and all. I've seen his videos. But there is such thing as thermal headroom when overclocking. You lose stability easily when overclocking any amount with Ryzen. Get a better cooler, period if you overclock any amount. This has been around for many many years. It's nothing new.
 

DrMrLordX

Lifer
Apr 27, 2000
17,818
6,805
136
OP, since you have RAM stability issues, I will make the following recommendations:

1). Try up to 1.42v vDIMM
2). Try up to 1.1v SoC voltage
3). Also maybe try raising vcore a little bit

All three can contribute to RAM stability. Anything else more intensive than that will require you to mess with subtimings I think. Not sure what's exposed on the Tomahawk though.
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
51,943
6,889
126
That's cool and all. I've seen his videos. But there is such thing as thermal headroom when overclocking. You lose stability easily when overclocking any amount with Ryzen. Get a better cooler, period if you overclock any amount. This has been around for many many years. It's nothing new.
That's what I thought too, when I read many reviews and YouTube videos that said that you could OC Ryzen on the included stock cooler. I didn't have much luck. Turned out, that I really needed better case airflow. Once you've got that, you actually CAN OC Ryzen 5 1600 to 3.80Ghz, on the stock cooler. Depending on sustained load, though. Once again, even for DC, 120mm water wasn't even enough to keep it below 80C all of the time.

Edit: Oh yes, the Tech Deals guy is cool. If you don't want to listen to me, listen to him, I guess.
 
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VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
51,943
6,889
126
Sorry Larry.....I meant no disrespect!
Nah, just yanking your chain.

(@XavierMace probably gets tired correcting my lack of data or more anecdotal threads that I've posted.)

Case cooling is important for Ryzen builds too. It's possible to overheat the VRMs and shut down, even if the CPU isn't quite overheating. I've had it shut down on me when the CPU hit 80C.
 

Reinvented

Senior member
Oct 5, 2005
489
77
91
That's what I thought too, when I read many reviews and YouTube videos that said that you could OC Ryzen on the included stock cooler. I didn't have much luck. Turned out, that I really needed better case airflow. Once you've got that, you actually CAN OC Ryzen 5 1600 to 3.80Ghz, on the stock cooler. Depending on sustained load, though. Once again, even for DC, 120mm water wasn't even enough to keep it below 80C all of the time.

Edit: Oh yes, the Tech Deals guy is cool. If you don't want to listen to me, listen to him, I guess.
Just because one guy on YouTube says you CAN overclock with a stock cooler, doesn't mean you should. Yes, the stock cooler does okay, but you'd just be blowing the same hot air over the entire area rather than removing it. You can't possibly believe that is even remotely okay and then wonder why it's not stable. Even you needed better cooling and airflow. You won't be getting that airflow with the stock cooler. My statement still stands...get a better cooler, and watch the instability disappear.
 

XavierMace

Diamond Member
Apr 20, 2013
4,307
449
126
Nah, just yanking your chain.

(@XavierMace probably gets tired correcting my lack of data or more anecdotal threads that I've posted.)

Case cooling is important for Ryzen builds too. It's possible to overheat the VRMs and shut down, even if the CPU isn't quite overheating. I've had it shut down on me when the CPU hit 80C.
When correcting people is sadly a good portion of your day at work, sometimes you forget to turn that off when on the internet. Especially when you're on the internet at work.

That's cool and all. I've seen his videos. But there is such thing as thermal headroom when overclocking. You lose stability easily when overclocking any amount with Ryzen. Get a better cooler, period if you overclock any amount. This has been around for many many years. It's nothing new.
While I always recommend a better cooler, stating you can't overclock on a stock cooler isn't accurate. A stock R5 1600 has a TDP of 65W. The stock cooler is supposed to be rated for 95W. Using the numbers Larry mentioned (R5 1600 @ 3.8Ghz 1.35v), I come up with an adjusted TDP of 98W (rounded up). That's not that far off. On the other hand an R7 1700X @ 4.0Ghz 1.40v is a 145w TDP (rounded), so yeah, that's not happening on their stock cooler. Of course those are estimations and there's other variables but it's a good starting point.

So yeah, you don't have much headroom on a stock cooler, but you do have some.
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
51,943
6,889
126
Yes, the stock cooler does okay, but you'd just be blowing the same hot air over the entire area rather than removing it. You can't possibly believe that is even remotely okay and then wonder why it's not stable.
Hence why you need case cooling.

There's several things at work here.

1) The heatsink attached to the CPU heatspreader, should draw heat from the CPU heatspreader, FASTER than the die produces it. Can the stock heatsink perform this task? YES, as long as the CPU die is producing LESS than 95W of heat.

2) The case fans need to exhaust the hot air coming off of the heatsink, and blow in cool air. This needs to be done at a sufficient rate of flow, such that the hot air doesn't build up around the heatsink, and prevent #1 from happening.

Yes, you can OC with the stock heatsink, to a certain level, see #1. But if you do, then you're going to need #2 as well.

Edit: See XM's post, there is a (little) headroom to OC on the stock cooler, assuming decent case airflow.

If we're talking, "enthusiast-level" overclocking, like Tim the Toolman putting a turbo boost on a gas leafblower, then no, you wouldn't want the stock cooler for that. (Although you might want to use that turbo-charged gas leafblower for some case cooling.)
 
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