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Romney will fight marijuana legalization 'Tooth and Nail'

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Moonbeam

Elite Member
Nov 24, 1999
66,613
3,406
126
You ever live in LA?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=76RWWl01JMc

It's true too, I always do my best thinking on the bus (or the shower).
What you showed was an example of thinking by association one idea triggering the next. All this is based on previous experience, the past which is dead. This will lead if followed with precision, to the realization that thought is a prison. When one experiences the utter hopelessness of this kind of thinking to solving the emptiness of the heart, one can come to the end of thought. There the mind can turn inside out and God appear. God, knowledge, realization, love, being, certainty, whatever word you want to use, it doesn't matter. You are not alone. You have a friend in the dark whom you don't see because he looks out of the same eyes that you do. You are not alone. Do not think about it. You are not alone.
 

shira

Diamond Member
Jan 12, 2005
9,574
5
81
Filthy milk drinkers. One day it's 2% and the next heroin.
You seriously underestimate the danger of 2% milk. Once a person gets a taste of even a little milk fat, the next step is ice cream! And even butter cannot be ruled out!
 

Ns1

No Lifer
Jun 17, 2001
55,399
1,510
126
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday voted 11-2 to repeal its recent ban on medical marijuana dispensaries, averting a March election on the explosive issue of storefront pot sales.

The action leaves Los Angeles, once again, without any law regulating the estimated 1,000 pot shops operating within its boundaries. But that does not necessarily mean dispensaries will be allowed to stay open.

Council members say they are hoping that a new federal crackdown on L.A. dispensaries may accomplish what they hoped to achieve with their ban. “That is our relief,” Councilman Jose Huizar said of the federal action, which began last week with raids on several dispensaries. Dozens of other pot shops were sent letters, ordering them to close.

The city may also seek to shut down dispensaries on its own by prosecuting operators for violating city land use laws.

After the City Council voted for the ban in July, activists collected tens of thousands of signatures to send a referendum repealing it to the ballot. Council members on Tuesday had to decide whether to rescind the ordinance or put the matter on the March ballot, when voters will be choosing a new mayor, city controller, city attorney and eight council members.
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2012/10/city-council-repeals-marijuana-dispensaries.html
 

Ns1

No Lifer
Jun 17, 2001
55,399
1,510
126
In a faint and gravelly voice, Los Angeles Councilman Bill Rosendahl delivered an impassioned plea Tuesday asking his colleagues to lift the ban on pot dispensaries, asking them: “Where does anybody go, even a councilman go, to get his medical marijuana?”
Minutes before the council voted 11-2 to rescind its recently passed ban on storefront pot shops, Rosendahl said the council’s decision had created “a very emotional moment” for him. Rosendahl has been battling cancer for the past three months and relying on medical marijuana during that time.

“On the 20th of July, I had an MRI that was very, very serious. And the bottom line on that was, they didn’t give me much time to live. And I said, ‘No, no no no, I'm not ready to go. I certainly want to live a long time,’” said Rosendahl, who has been undergoing chemotherapy treatments and relying on a walker to move around in recent days.

Rosendahl, 67, said he began taking medical marijuana a decade ago to manage his neuropathy, a stinging pain in his feet, taking it “occasionally at night.” But on Tuesday, he put the issue in the context of his battle with cancer, which has made it difficult for him to speak above a whisper.

“If I can’t get marijuana, and it’s medically prescribed, what do I do?” he asked his colleagues.

Rosendahl criticized President Obama’s handling of the issue and spoke against some of the recent federal raids of dispensaries. And he said Los Angeles should work with state lawmakers to make California law regulating medical marijuana clearer.
Rosendahl, you da man.
 

IGBT

Lifer
Jul 16, 2001
17,699
47
91
with the numerous opportunities liberals have had over the years..going all the way back to carter why isn't this stuff legal?? I wana see you guys get all the dope you deserve.
 

lotus503

Diamond Member
Feb 12, 2005
6,502
1
76
with the numerous opportunities liberals have had over the years..going all the way back to carter why isn't this stuff legal?? I wana see you guys get all the dope you deserve.
That's awesome because after an 18 hour day of hell I prefer a joint to a glass of scotch.
 

Darwin333

Lifer
Dec 11, 2006
19,947
2,323
126
Never thought i'd say this, but it actually is a gateway drug. Most people wouldn't go from having a beer to snorting a line.
Are you actually implying that alcohol is the gateway drug to pot and pot is the gateway drug to "snorting lines"? Beer must become public enemy number 1 obviously, right?
 

silverpig

Lifer
Jul 29, 2001
27,708
8
81
Are you actually implying that alcohol is the gateway drug to pot and pot is the gateway drug to "snorting lines"? Beer must become public enemy number 1 obviously, right?
And coffee before that. And hot chocolate before that. And breast milk before that.
 

lotus503

Diamond Member
Feb 12, 2005
6,502
1
76
it's not the booze. it's not the dope. It's the desire to intoxicate. That's the monkey.
I think intoxicating every few weeks after a long hard day at work to relax with some friends or whatever, is healthy on a number of levels.
 

shira

Diamond Member
Jan 12, 2005
9,574
5
81
The gateway to marijuana is tobacco. We should make tobacco illegal.
No, tobacco - unlike marijuana - is the gateway to death. Clearly, that's not a good enough reason to make tobacco illegal.
 

shira

Diamond Member
Jan 12, 2005
9,574
5
81
Heck, writing off portions of every demographic, and yeah, maybe a little more youth than others. I really am starting to wonder if the Reps seriously wanted to make a real go at winning for POTUS or if they wanted to give a 'good enough' appearance and just are content with letting Obama slog it out with them for the next 4 years.

Then come 2016 they can point to 8 years of Obama and be virtually assured presidency. They better pray they can keep a House majority for that period of time and not hand Dems a fillibuster proof majority in the Senate. Might work for them for 2 more years, but another 2? Not sure if the country would reward them again at that point...

Chuck
This is a great strategy for ensuring that Obama won't be re-elected in 2016. In fact, I can state with near certainty (barring a fast-track Constitutional amendment) that Obama will not be re-elected in 2016. Unfortunately, running against Obama's eight years in 2016 isn't going to be very effective at stopping Hillary, even a 69-year-old Hillary.
 

zanejohnson

Diamond Member
Nov 29, 2002
7,048
7
81
the idea of making a law, forbidding what a person puts in there own body.. not only goes against moral, it goes against everything darwin believed in too.. put something in your body that will kill you, and you will die, your son will see.. he will not repeat (and the gene pool gets a little bit better).. (i'm not talking about pot, just a frame of reference..

here america is thinking about our trade of oil, there's one thing that is a higher commodity.. the opium poppy..

it gets high prices in the illicit market as well as the pharma market.. and i bet you the same players are playing in both..

if opium cultivation or marijuana cultivation suddenly became legal here, 100 farms would pop up overnight.. there would be a great shift in money, and the very rich would have competition eventually...

it would be chaos, but it would change everything we THOUGHT we knew.. and something not very people have the capacity to comprehend.

that is the number 1 cash crop.. not corn. or oil..or waging wars for profit. and the limits are incredible. therefore, it is VERY CONTROLLED.
 

jackstar7

Lifer
Jun 26, 2009
11,679
1,941
126
with the numerous opportunities liberals have had over the years..going all the way back to carter why isn't this stuff legal?? I wana see you guys get all the dope you deserve.
How is this a left-right issue in your mind exactly?
 

xj0hnx

Diamond Member
Dec 18, 2007
9,267
3
76
the idea of making a law, forbidding what a person puts in there own body.. not only goes against moral, it goes against everything darwin believed in too.. put something in your body that will kill you, and you will die, your son will see.. he will not repeat (and the gene pool gets a little bit better).. (i'm not talking about pot, just a frame of reference..

here america is thinking about our trade of oil, there's one thing that is a higher commodity.. the opium poppy..

it gets high prices in the illicit market as well as the pharma market.. and i bet you the same players are playing in both..

if opium cultivation or marijuana cultivation suddenly became legal here, 100 farms would pop up overnight.. there would be a great shift in money, and the very rich would have competition eventually...

it would be chaos, but it would change everything we THOUGHT we knew.. and something not very people have the capacity to comprehend.

that is the number 1 cash crop.. not corn. or oil..or waging wars for profit. and the limits are incredible. therefore, it is VERY CONTROLLED.
There were three, I believe, very large poppy farms here in the US, WA, somewhere NE, and one in AZ. The one in AZ was the one supplying pretty much all the "ornamentals", at least the good ones, and got busted by the DEA a couple years ago. That being said pharmaceutical companies that make opiate/opiods have to get their raw opium from somewhere. The problem is the yield per acre is too low to mitigate the risk. I don't think that even if it were legal we'd see large scale poppy farming for heroin production here, if I remember correctly it's something ridiculous like 5 acres worth of raw for a few hundred grams. Weed on the other hand You can grow several thousands of dollars worth in a dececnt sized closet.
 
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BudAshes

Lifer
Jul 20, 2003
12,667
1,571
126
I love how the people that always say they are about freedom want to regulate the fuck out of everything that they don't do. Freedom is obviously only important if it directly relates to your insignificant existence. Since I don't care about guns make them illegal! I don't smoke pot, ILLEGAL! I don't want to marry a same sex person, ILLEGAL! How about all of you nosy busy bodies shut the fuck up and let people live their lives how they see fit.
 

chucky2

Lifer
Dec 9, 1999
10,038
36
86
This is a great strategy for ensuring that Obama won't be re-elected in 2016. In fact, I can state with near certainty (barring a fast-track Constitutional amendment) that Obama will not be re-elected in 2016. Unfortunately, running against Obama's eight years in 2016 isn't going to be very effective at stopping Hillary, even a 69-year-old Hillary.
How could you have possibly read my post and got that I was saying Repubs would be planning to run against Obama in 2016? Wow...
 

Ns1

No Lifer
Jun 17, 2001
55,399
1,510
126
Oakland, good for something:

In an unprecedented civil complaint, the city of Oakland is suing federal prosecutors to stop them from seizing property leased by the nation's largest medical marijuana dispensary.

The complaint seeks to "restrain and declare unlawful" a July federal forfeiture action against Harborside Health Center's landlords in Oakland and San Jose.

It comes as federal prosecutors have ramped up efforts to shutter dispensaries statewide, targeting those close to schools, as well as operations such as Harborside, which are in compliance with local and state laws but prosecutors have deemed "superstores."

Launched in 2006, Harborside now counts 108,000 patients in its collective and paid $3.5 million in taxes last year, $1.1 million of that to Oakland. Co-founder Steve DeAngelo worked closely with Oakland officials as they crafted one of the nation's strictest regulatory schemes to monitor and tax the industry.

The lawsuit filed Wednesday in federal court against Atty. Gen. Eric Holder and Melinda Haag, U.S. attorney for the Northern District, refers to Harborside as "vital to the safe and affordable distribution of medical cannabis to patients" suffering from pain, illness and injury.

San Francisco attorney Cedric Chao, who is representing Oakland, said in a statement Wednesday the federal government "acted beyond its authority" by filing the forfeiture action outside the statute of limitations.
He added the government has indicated for many years "by its words and actions that so long as dispensaries and medical patients acted consistently with state law, the dispensaries would be allowed to operate. Oakland has reasonably relied on these assurances."

In an interview, Oakland City Atty. Barbara J. Parker said the lawsuit "is about protecting the rights of legitimate patients who need this medicine” and “doing everything we can to assure that this pipeline is not shut off."

Advocates for medical marijuana said they know of no other instance in which a city has sued federal prosecutors in an attempt to protect a dispensary.

Harborside's Oakland dispensary is the largest in the nation, and the center also operates a smaller sister dispensary in San Jose. Landlords facing the forfeiture action have moved in state court to evict, while Harborside has countered it is meeting all lease requirements. Court rulings are expected soon.
 

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