RIP Anthony Bourdain.

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Drako

Lifer
Jun 9, 2007
10,706
161
106
Damn it, loved No Reservations. I was planning on watching Parts Unknown several times on Netflix, but never got around to it.

A great lose for the foodie/entertainment world. RIP.
 

Noah Abrams

Golden Member
Feb 15, 2018
1,041
109
76
no dummy. I like Bourdaine and admired him, until he fucking killed himself leaving behind a little girl who is like WTF where my daddy? I have zero respect for people who commit suicide. if you don't like my position on the matter I don't care.
If you have a daughter, maybe there could be a case made for sympathy towards her on fate having given her a father full of anger.
 
Aug 11, 2008
10,451
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Complete and utter despair. You cannot see a way out other than ending it all.
Obviously, that is true, but still does not answer the question "why?". I can understand someone with a serious illness, or in great physical pain, or even abject poverty, with no hope for improvement, ending it all, but it does seem strange that someone who appears to "have it all" would do so.
 

sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
88,261
11,017
126
Obviously, that is true, but still does not answer the question "why?". I can understand someone with a serious illness, or in great physical pain, or even abject poverty, with no hope for improvement, ending it all, but it does seem strange that someone who appears to "have it all" would do so.

Yet it happens to a lot of people.
 

vi edit

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 28, 1999
61,795
6,359
126
Obviously, that is true, but still does not answer the question "why?". I can understand someone with a serious illness, or in great physical pain, or even abject poverty, with no hope for improvement, ending it all, but it does seem strange that someone who appears to "have it all" would do so.
Success can provide a very overpowering and hard to understand feedback loop. Once you start providing a certain level of success it's expected, you have to keep digging to find new content, keeping people happy, and drives it's own stress of continuously trying to keep up your product. At a certain point you may feel out of control of your own life and may not have the tools or support to deal with weight.
 

zinfamous

No Lifer
Jul 12, 2006
107,778
23,898
146
Obviously, that is true, but still does not answer the question "why?". I can understand someone with a serious illness, or in great physical pain, or even abject poverty, with no hope for improvement, ending it all, but it does seem strange that someone who appears to "have it all" would do so.
"appear" is what matters. What we think we know about such people is clearly not very close to the truth. What we see as "having it all" doesn't approach the truth of the illness that such people have in their lives. People like outhouse, simply refuse to understand that the world exists for other people, in completely different ways than what he wants it to be: the way he sees it, for him and himself only. If you don't live that life as he approves, then you are less than human, to people like Outhouse. The repercussions of what people leave behind are very real and truly sad--no one discounts that--but to be so naive as to assume that the mind of the individual that is not you, works in the same way as yours biochemically, and thus responds to stress and reality in exactly the same ways, is to be as foolish, childish, and lacking of empathy as someone like Outhouse.

Those of us that aren't famous, aren't going to understand this, as it happens over and over and over and over again. Many of the work tirelessly, year-round, because they truly are trying to keep themselves busy and distracted from whatever it is that torments them.
 

clamum

Lifer
Feb 13, 2003
26,240
394
126
I never really watched the guy but I know he was quite popular and people really liked his work. I have read about his past addictions somewhat, or knew about them at least, so honestly I wasn't really surprised when I heard this. I mean, I don't think all addicts will end up committing suicide, but I think those with (past) addictions are more susceptible to depression.and suicide.

Rest in peace sir. Maybe I'll check out some of his shows as I heard they're on Netflix (for a bit longer?).
 

PianoMan

Senior member
Jan 28, 2006
505
10
81
RIP. Anthony, u will be missed.

Gonna start re-binge watching his shows to celebrate his life.
 

Mermaidman

Diamond Member
Sep 4, 2003
7,945
65
91
Celeb deaths don't affect me much, but this one truly saddens me. After learning of Bourdain's death this morning, I booked a flight to see my father next week - He's suffering from retirement doldrums..
 

Denly

Golden Member
May 14, 2011
1,348
160
106
I'm so damn angry right now I could snap kitchen knives.

3 his books are still on my night stand this morning.

Bourdain has been my idol since the late 90s, always felt a kinship with him as we both traveled a lot as kids, and as adults saw food as the most interesting portion of anthropology.

I just had to put my dog down too. This is horrible. My heart goes out to his girls, and also to Eric Ripert. I have a special kind of anguish and sympathy for the friend that makes the discovery. :confounded:
Looking to pickup one of his books, any suggestion?
 

MrSquished

Lifer
Jan 14, 2013
14,706
11,698
136
Looking to pickup one of his books, any suggestion?
I never read his fiction stuff but from his main non-fiction books you gotta get the one that put him on the map - Kitchen Confidential. It's an all-time classic and what launched his post-restaurant career.

I just bought The Nasty Bits today, which is more a compilation of non-fiction essays/stories and I think it's going to rock, and I have read his newer book (2011) called Medium Raw, which was not as good as KC in my opinion. A Cook's Tour is old school and good too but KC is definitely more the page-turner.
 
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Ns1

No Lifer
Jun 17, 2001
55,385
1,517
126
Jonathan Gold wrote a really nice piece

http://www.latimes.com/food/jonathan-gold/la-fo-gold-anthony-bourdain-20180608-story.html

If you spent much time in food circles around the year 2000, you knew that American food culture was beginning to change — and not necessarily toward the embrace of the seasonable, sustainable, organic pleasures promised by the food revolution. Chefs had been part of popular culture for years. What was new was the idea of the kitchen — the sweating, bleeding, cursing crew of cooks and dishwashers, the maelstrom of sharp edges and leaping flames, the battle-hardened camaraderie of men and women working together in submarine-tight proximity.

Anthony Bourdain’s first articles for the New Yorker, which became the foundation for his first book, “Kitchen Confidential,” slashed through the walls separating working-class cooks from their soft, well-fed customers, and for perhaps the first time since George Orwell’s “Down and Out in Paris and London,” elevated the rough humanity of the kitchen above the soft pleasures of the table. It is hard to imagine the current American restaurant scene, powered by the beauties of hard work, loud music and love, without him. It is hard to imagine an aspiring chef without a worn copy of “Kitchen Confidential” sitting by the bed.

Bourdain wrote for the people with sheet pan burns on their arms and bits of flour stuck in their hair; for the people who found the deepest parts of themselves inside the stinking cavities of the pigs they were breaking down for dinner service; and for the people who cursed equally well in English and in Spanish. His best pieces tended to be not about great chefs, but about people like the cook who cut every piece of fish served at a three-star gastronomic temple but who had never eaten in the restaurant.

His greatest fame likely came with his food/travel television series, hopping from the Food Network to the Travel Channel and then finally to CNN. From the beginning, Bourdain was most interested in the intersection of food and culture, and a shot of a fish on a plate would usually be preceded by an exploration of the people who had cooked it, sold it in the market or landed it on their boat. He didn’t ignore the world’s great restaurants — some of the best episodes involved places such as El Bulli or Restaurant Paul Bocuse, and Le Bernardin’s Eric Ripert, who reportedly discovered Bourdain’s body in a hotel room this morning, was a constant presence both onscreen and off — but even there the emphasis was more on the people who loved food than on a sauced hare’s disembodied presence.

“Parts Unknown,” his series for CNN, at times fused the culinary with the political. Bourdain looked for answers about the future of places such as Libya, Ethiopia and the Punjab region of India through their food cultures, and he was occasionally less than optimistic.

From the outside, his last year seemed devoted to combating sexual harassment through his passionate advocacy of the #MeToo movement. (His girlfriend, Italian actress Asia Argento, has accused Harvey Weinstein of rape.) He was also publicly mournful about his role in toxic male kitchen culture, which he may have helped to cultivate with his earliest writing, but which he forcefully denounced in later years.

“I’ve had to ask myself…” he told Slate last year. “To what extent in that book did I provide validation to meatheads?”

The outpouring of grief in the food world the morning after his death is overwhelming. I counted 38 consecutive Bourdain posts in my Twitter feed this morning before I gave up and closed the app.
 

Ns1

No Lifer
Jun 17, 2001
55,385
1,517
126
from reddit:

In 2010, I covered a Bourdain book-tour stop at The Fox Theatre in St. Louis where a boy with leukemia asked his culinary idol where he should go eat - anywhere in the world - once he’s in remission. Bourdain didn’t hesitate: Spain. But then after Bourdain left town and our story about the tour appearance ran, his assistant reached out to me, privately. Bourdain wanted to help send this kid to Spain and make it the time of his life. So, with the help of Make A Wish, Evan Piña-White went to Spain. We wrote about that but our story doesn’t mention Bourdain’s involvement (per his wishes). He set the kid up at the best restaurants & helped make the trip incredible. He was special. ~ Evan Benn, editor-in-chief of Miami Herald
 
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MrSquished

Lifer
Jan 14, 2013
14,706
11,698
136
Man after I got home today I sat down and read some Bourdain tributes from various sources and it started to hit me and I got choked up. Then I just watched the Greek Islands episode of Parts Unknown with my girl and I just lost it. Absolutely brilliant television, so thoughtful and thorough. I have never really cried from a celebrity death before but this one got me good. Thank god he contributed so much for us to consume and learn from, but it's just heart-breakingly sad that he won't be giving us anymore, and no longer bringing what must have been a lot of joy into the lives of his friends and family.
 

BarkingGhostar

Diamond Member
Nov 20, 2009
9,957
2,506
136
I feel sadden by his 11 year old no longer having a father. In time she will understand, but she's 11 and it will be years before she understands. Wife and I talked about this sad news during dinner. We loved the guy. Not sure what pushed him over the edge, but it doesn't really matter as it changes nothing for him or his child.
 

PlanetJosh

Golden Member
May 6, 2013
1,627
75
91
Part of having it all and being famous could include having lots of women if he chose to. Maybe he indulged in that in between girlfriends. So that makes it even harder to understand the suicide. Not that he ever cheated on his last girlfriend or any girlfriend.
 

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