Repartitioning External Drive

ChAoTiCpInOy

Diamond Member
Jun 24, 2006
6,446
1
81
I have a 1.5TB drive. I am thinking of partitioning it as such

1) 600 GB Time Machine backup (I don't want to give Time Machine 1.5TB's to work with)
2) 250 GB for Windows 7 drive
3) everythign else for my main usage drive (Storing Data and the such)

Do I need to readjust some of the numbers?

I'm basically going to do all this and then start Time Machine over on the drive.
 

aphex

Moderator<br>All Things Apple
Moderator
Jul 19, 2001
38,572
2
91
What is the size of the main drive in your computer?
 

RadiclDreamer

Diamond Member
Aug 8, 2004
8,622
40
91
As long as you arent changing loads of data and dont want to go back to the begining of time those numbers dont look too bad to me, the thing that DOES concern me is installing windows 7 on an external (likely usb/firewire I assume) drive.

I'm not sure if bootcamp would allow that and even if it would it would be slow
 

Ka0t1x

Golden Member
Jan 23, 2004
1,724
0
71
I wouldn't boot off of an external, possibly if it was FW800 but that's its own category.

You should be able to use diskutil command line to resize your partitions, while not having to repartition the whole drive.
 

ChAoTiCpInOy

Diamond Member
Jun 24, 2006
6,446
1
81
My main drive is 320gb but 60gb is for Windows 7.

The external won't be the boot drive for Windows 7 just another external to install stuff on. It is FW800.

I would use the diskutil command but right now there is a lot of Time Machine backups on the drive and I wouldn't be able to.
 

MStele

Senior member
Sep 14, 2009
410
0
0
Here is my suggestion. It may be overkill for you but I do this. First, off get a second internal drive for backup use that has enough room for all that you need. Partition it in a way that suits your backup style. Personally I just go with one main partition, but I understand your need to limit your backup software. Once you've done all your backups as needed and have everything in place, take your external and make a copy of your internet backup drive.

There is a method to my madness, and these are lessons i've learned over the years :

1. You should always maintain proper backups, and that includes redundancy of the backup itself.

2. Internal drives make better backup drives because they are more accessable during every day use (they don't require power-up) and you benefit from full SATA speed. Obviously "better" or "worse" is a matter of opinion, so take it as such.

3. Offloading backup duties from your system drive will provide more room to breath as well as making a system crash much easier to bounce back from (assuming you have a proper image on another drive).

4. In my experience, external drives tend to fail more often than internals due to the additional interface circuitry (more parts to fail) , and thus IMO shouldn't be used as a primary backup device. This is especially true if you plan to backup often, or plan to keep the drive running all the time, since wear and tear can reduce external life considerably. This is another reason why I prefer internal drives for primary backup.

Obviously this is just one way of doing it, and doing a single backup to external will work fine for most people. Personally, I assume all hardware eventually fails and plan accordingly.