QUESTION FOR EE's

Goosemaster

Lifer
Apr 10, 2001
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I just came back from my Diff. EQ'ns class and wanted to ask you some questions regarding my mathematical future.


After DE and "Topics in DE" ( systems of DE's), how does the average BSEE curriculum approach math? For example, from then on, does it become strictly an applied skilled used in other classes such as electronics, or are there more "math" classes?

Thanks.
 

WhiteKnight

Platinum Member
May 21, 2001
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Well, you may want to take an applied math class or an analysis class, the latter especially if you are planning on going to grad school.
 

xyion

Senior member
Jan 20, 2001
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I had to take up to Cal 3, ODE (no PDE), and Matricies I believe. I was done with "Math" classes after 2.5years of school, but the math is applied everywhere

EDIT: and a Stat class, if that counts as math.
 

jteef

Golden Member
Feb 20, 2001
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we didn't have any more courses taught by the math department after diff eq's, but you can be sure we used all the stuff we learned in every calc class and diff eq's in 75% of the EE courses from then on. (exception being the linear algebra stuff from calc 5)

courses that stick out in my mind are of course the Emag for EE courses, the more advanced circuit analysis courses, signals, random signals, motors

when we came across a particularly difficult or outright unsolvable differential equation, the professors usually did spare us from the cruelty and annotate the significance rather than leaving it as an "exercise to the reader" so that was nice...
 

CanOWorms

Lifer
Jul 3, 2001
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We went up to linear algebra.

The math in an EE class will be much easier than the math in a pure math class. Your professors will brush up (you'll mostly remember things anyways) on critical mathematical procedures in courses when they're required (at least in my experiences). How much math you encounter would depend on which field you concentrate on.
 

TuxDave

Lifer
Oct 8, 2002
10,572
3
71
Probabilty, Linear Algebra, and Convex Optimizations or something like that. That's all the 'math' from EEs that I know of. Everything else then uses this math.
 

Goosemaster

Lifer
Apr 10, 2001
48,777
3
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Thanks. You have all been very helfpful as usual.

For reference, I have taken:

Calc I (limits, derivivatives, optomization yada yada)
Calc II (Integration, some DE's, non-cartesian graphing, and series)
Calc III ( 2d Vectors, 3d derivations and integration, 3d vectors, multivariables and applying all that to vector fields)
Linear Algebra (Augmented matrices, Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors, vector spaces yada yada)

I am currently in ordinary Differential equations , and next term, hopefully, I will be taking Partial next term. With the way I am going, hopefully I will get a chance to transfer to Virginia Tech by next Fall or soon after ,while having earned an Associates here at NVCC.

I must say that I am very glad to hear that Math will remain a permanent fixture in the future for me. It was once my absolute worst subject and, ironically, it is now is the flagship of my success and is my sole source of motivation (INCOMPREHENSIBLY IRONIC). I was just afraid that the courses would get stale and that I would forget what I know. Diff. Eq'ns looks like it will be fun ( i know, I know, having fun is unethical) and my prof came off as a smart and helpful individual.
 

cchen

Diamond Member
Oct 12, 1999
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Convex Optimizations ? That's an OR class, and a grad class to boot
 

cchen

Diamond Member
Oct 12, 1999
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76
Originally posted by: Goosemaster
Originally posted by: cchen
Convex Optimizations ? That's an OR class, and a grad class to boot

no...area and volume silly:p...that was in calc I

heh... convex optimization isn't as easy as the stuff in calc

The problem of maximizing a linear function over a convex polyhedron, also known as operations research or optimization theory. The general problem of convex optimization is to find the minimum of a convex (or quasiconvex) function f on a finite-dimensional convex body A. Methods of solution include Levin's algorithm and the method of circumscribed ellipsoids, also called the Nemirovsky-Yudin-Shor method.
 

RaynorWolfcastle

Diamond Member
Feb 8, 2001
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The truth of the matter is, most of the problems with DE's that you'll encounter as an EE will be solved by SPICE or Matlab. FWIW, signal and systems is little more than applied Fourier analysis, that can almost count as a math class.
 

blahblah99

Platinum Member
Oct 10, 2000
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In the real world, you probably wont' be solving differential equations that much, unless you go into a hardcore field.

You will be using a lot of signals and systems, bode plots, vectors, and some calculus.
 

Chaotic42

Lifer
Jun 15, 2001
33,929
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That's a lot of math that you guys have to take.

Not as much as I do, but I'm going for a pure math degree. I've heard EE is one of the hardest programs to go after.

:beer: for the engineers.
 

fawhfe

Senior member
Mar 22, 2001
442
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I just finished diff eq's and that's pretty much all my university recommends (having already taken linear algebra and the basic calc stuff). I might go on and take differential geometry for fun. Also, I've been told that complex analysis is good for physics, so if you plan to head down that path at all, that might also be a good class.

This is an entirely uneducated opinion, but I would recommend not taking a PDE course. Basically the problems are ridiculously easy if you understand the methods, and since it's difficult to derive the methods, they can't really make the exams hard by trying to make you come up with something "new". So effectively, what it turns into is you memorize a lot of these techniques, many of which have nothing to do with each other despite the fact that in the future, whenever you see a PDE (which I doubt is all that often), you'll probably be pulling out a handbook as an engineer. Again, that's a totally unqualified opinion since I'm still a junior in EE and I didn't attend a single lecture for diff eq or do a single homework (Curse you Diablo 2).
 

cchen

Diamond Member
Oct 12, 1999
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Originally posted by: fawhfe
I just finished diff eq's and that's pretty much all my university recommends (having already taken linear algebra and the basic calc stuff). I might go on and take differential geometry for fun. Also, I've been told that complex analysis is good for physics, so if you plan to head down that path at all, that might also be a good class.

This is an entirely uneducated opinion, but I would recommend not taking a PDE course. Basically the problems are ridiculously easy if you understand the methods, and since it's difficult to derive the methods, they can't really make the exams hard by trying to make you come up with something "new". So effectively, what it turns into is you memorize a lot of these techniques, many of which have nothing to do with each other despite the fact that in the future, whenever you see a PDE (which I doubt is all that often), you'll probably be pulling out a handbook as an engineer. Again, that's a totally unqualified opinion since I'm still a junior in EE and I didn't attend a single lecture for diff eq or do a single homework (Curse you Diablo 2).

That's the same thing for ODE. All you do is memorize how to solve different types of problems
 

fawhfe

Senior member
Mar 22, 2001
442
0
0
Originally posted by: cchen
Originally posted by: fawhfe
I just finished diff eq's and that's pretty much all my university recommends (having already taken linear algebra and the basic calc stuff). I might go on and take differential geometry for fun. Also, I've been told that complex analysis is good for physics, so if you plan to head down that path at all, that might also be a good class.

This is an entirely uneducated opinion, but I would recommend not taking a PDE course. Basically the problems are ridiculously easy if you understand the methods, and since it's difficult to derive the methods, they can't really make the exams hard by trying to make you come up with something "new". So effectively, what it turns into is you memorize a lot of these techniques, many of which have nothing to do with each other despite the fact that in the future, whenever you see a PDE (which I doubt is all that often), you'll probably be pulling out a handbook as an engineer. Again, that's a totally unqualified opinion since I'm still a junior in EE and I didn't attend a single lecture for diff eq or do a single homework (Curse you Diablo 2).

That's the same thing for ODE. All you do is memorize how to solve different types of problems

True enough, but sometimes linear ODE's come up on exams (esp in physics where they aren't frightened of math) and it might be useful to know them. I've never even been asked to do a PDE in EE yet and while I have seen some in physics, they've always come with an explanation of how to do it or "here is the answer to this diff eq--the solution is beyond the scope of this book but here's a reference to another book if you want to see it done anyways."
 

TuxDave

Lifer
Oct 8, 2002
10,572
3
71
Originally posted by: cchen
Convex Optimizations ? That's an OR class, and a grad class to boot

OR uses it, a bunch of EEs use it too. We have to figure out the optimal designs for our circuits which needs convex optimizations.
 

Goosemaster

Lifer
Apr 10, 2001
48,777
3
81
Originally posted by: cchen
Originally posted by: Goosemaster
Originally posted by: cchen
Convex Optimizations ? That's an OR class, and a grad class to boot

no...area and volume silly:p...that was in calc I

heh... convex optimization isn't as easy as the stuff in calc

The problem of maximizing a linear function over a convex polyhedron, also known as operations research or optimization theory. The general problem of convex optimization is to find the minimum of a convex (or quasiconvex) function f on a finite-dimensional convex body A. Methods of solution include Levin's algorithm and the method of circumscribed ellipsoids, also called the Nemirovsky-Yudin-Shor method.

Interesting...I don;t know that all that means, yet, but it still sounds interesting ;). Still, my point was I had NOT covered it. I covered the simplistic optimization using VERY simple DE's in Calc I as did everyone.
 

Goosemaster

Lifer
Apr 10, 2001
48,777
3
81
Originally posted by: blahblah99
In the real world, you probably wont' be solving differential equations that much, unless you go into a hardcore field.

You will be using a lot of signals and systems, bode plots, vectors, and some calculus.

What is "hardcore" asyou see it? :D

I just want to get a feel for the range of positions engineers hold.
 

misle

Diamond Member
Nov 30, 2000
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76
I'm only required to take up to Diff EQ. But many of the engineering classes are "Math for Engineering" classes. They basically expand on what we learn in Diff Eq and how it is used in the EE field. Lots of Laplace, Fourier, and Z transform stuff.