Question about USA Army - what does the colonel do and how highly is he ranked?

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Pepsei

Lifer
Dec 14, 2001
12,895
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Originally posted by: Baloo
Originally posted by: BoomerD
Originally posted by: Baloo
Originally posted by: BoomerD
The Colonel is military. Police are not. The Colonel has no direct authority over the police except in very rare situations.
The colonol has no authority over civilian police under any circumstances.
Actually, in martial law situations, the military would have authority over local police.
NO, they woulnd't. Don't confuse cooperation with authority.
Martial law is the system of rules that takes effect when the military takes control of the normal administration of justice.... look it up.

under martial law, you can be executed immediately for stealing a loaf of bread by the military in some country....

i think only the congress can declare martial law nowadays... right?
 

m1ldslide1

Platinum Member
Feb 20, 2006
2,321
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Originally posted by: datalink7
Originally posted by: Quintox
Colonel is the 6th rank in line, generally in the Army they lead Brigades or Regiments.
The difference being is that Regiments are made up of all the same type of Battalions (all Infantry for instance), whereas a Brigade is mixed (Infantry, Field Artillery, Support, etc.). Regimentally structured Brigades aren't used any more to my knowledge.

With two to five Battalions per Brigade, that is generally around 1500-4000 soldiers. So a Colonel has quite a bit of responsibility. Typically you don't make that rank till about 20 years in service, or later.
Is there a wiki that explains all this? I find myself wondering a lot too, what the difference is between a regiment/brigade/unit/platoon/division, etc.
 

IronWing

No Lifer
Jul 20, 2001
65,912
21,377
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Originally posted by: Ns1
better question, why the FUCK is colonel pronounced kernal!?
Even better, why is lieutenant pronounced luftenent by the limies?
 
Nov 3, 2004
10,491
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Originally posted by: Baloo
Originally posted by: BoomerD
Originally posted by: Baloo
Originally posted by: BoomerD
The Colonel is military. Police are not. The Colonel has no direct authority over the police except in very rare situations.
The colonol has no authority over civilian police under any circumstances.
Actually, in martial law situations, the military would have authority over local police.
NO, they woulnd't. Don't confuse cooperation with authority.
stupid people are the reason we don't have flying cars and time machines.
 

destrekor

Lifer
Nov 18, 2005
28,799
358
126
Originally posted by: IAteYourMother
Originally posted by: Baloo
Originally posted by: BoomerD
Originally posted by: Baloo
Originally posted by: BoomerD
The Colonel is military. Police are not. The Colonel has no direct authority over the police except in very rare situations.
The colonol has no authority over civilian police under any circumstances.
Actually, in martial law situations, the military would have authority over local police.
NO, they woulnd't. Don't confuse cooperation with authority.
stupid people are the reason we don't have flying cars and time machines.
I lol'd :laugh:


my goal in life is to reach full bird Colonel. Would be quite a comfortable life, and if I get my way... that's armor command. You'll see Franklin once again be a famous name in the US. And I have the lineage to make it even better. Good ol' (many greats) Uncle Ben will be proud. :) And yes, that part is true. And yes, I shall be a great armor field commander. I hope, unless they stick me with Transpo'. Then I'll just be pissed, but hopefully if thats the case I'll be able to branch detail into Armor. :)

and yes I'm being jokingly arrogant. :p Hopefully I'll be graced with amazing NCO's in the units I command to help get me there. Excellent NCO's will be important to keeping me both in line and to steer me toward the excellence track. There [hopefully] well-seasoned experience will be what teaches me and shapes me into a capable officer. Got a little while, sadly. Sometimes I wish I skipped school and went straight into enlisted and took the OCS track. If I do a career in the military this degree isn't really gonna do much other than be a nice looking piece of paper hanging on a wall somewhere in my house. heh
 

BoomerD

No Lifer
Feb 26, 2006
60,260
8,413
136
Originally posted by: Baloo
Originally posted by: BoomerD
Originally posted by: Baloo
Originally posted by: BoomerD
The Colonel is military. Police are not. The Colonel has no direct authority over the police except in very rare situations.
The colonol has no authority over civilian police under any circumstances.
Actually, in martial law situations, the military would have authority over local police.
NO, they woulnd't. Don't confuse cooperation with authority.
http://www.usconstitution.net/consttop_mlaw.html

"In strict dictionary terms, martial law is the suspension of civil authority and the imposition of military authority. When we say a region or country is "under martial law," we mean to say that the military is in control of the area, that it acts as the police, as the courts, as the legislature. The degree of control might vary - a nation may have a civilian legislature but have the courts administered by the military. Or the legislature and courts may operate under civilian control with a military ruler. In each case, martial law is in effect, even if it is not called "martial law."

 

dakels

Platinum Member
Nov 20, 2002
2,809
2
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There are colonel's in police too. My father was state police for NJ. Highest rank was Colonel. I don't know of any town/city departments that use that ranking system past Capt/chief/commandant.

I notice Colonel's in the USAF seem to pilot fighterjets often. Is this true? Seems like the only branch that puts colonel's in a front line in a blue collar manner so to speak (meaning they work, not entirely executively direct).

Also, in the USN Colonel = Captain.
 

destrekor

Lifer
Nov 18, 2005
28,799
358
126
Originally posted by: dakels
There are colonel's in police too. My father was state police for NJ. Highest rank was Colonel. I don't know of any town/city departments that use that ranking system past Capt/chief/commandant.

I notice Colonel's in the USAF seem to pilot fighterjets often. Is this true? Seems like the only branch that puts colonel's in a front line in a blue collar manner so to speak (meaning they work, not entirely executively direct).

Also, in the USN Colonel = Captain.
fighters are all officers, and while I'm not entirely sure about USAF and its command organization, I believe you will definitely see COL's in the cockpits, depending on the situation. For example, LTCs (Lt Col) are often the commander of a squadron. If an entire squadron is mobilized, that LTC is going to be amongst them. If you get any flights that consist of more than a squadron, you will likely have a COL amongst them acting as commander. This, of course, means they gotta take part in regular flights to make sure they maintain their piloting skills.
Specialized units, if there are any, will likely consist of higher ranking officers, if it's anything like specialized units in ground troops.
 

sonambulo

Diamond Member
Feb 22, 2004
4,783
1
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Originally posted by: destrekor
Sometimes I wish I skipped school and went straight into enlisted and took the OCS track.
You mean OCS right out of high school? Please explain.
 

Born2bwire

Diamond Member
Oct 28, 2005
9,840
6
71
Originally posted by: sonambulo
Originally posted by: destrekor
Sometimes I wish I skipped school and went straight into enlisted and took the OCS track.
You mean OCS right out of high school? Please explain.
He probably means that he got his bar through ROTC in college as opposed to being a 90 day wonder (though I'm pretty sure that idiom is no longer applicable).
 

Q

Lifer
Jul 21, 2005
12,056
3
81
Originally posted by: sonambulo
Originally posted by: destrekor
Sometimes I wish I skipped school and went straight into enlisted and took the OCS track.
You mean OCS right out of high school? Please explain.
Get off my avatar
 

destrekor

Lifer
Nov 18, 2005
28,799
358
126
Originally posted by: Born2bwire
Originally posted by: sonambulo
Originally posted by: destrekor
Sometimes I wish I skipped school and went straight into enlisted and took the OCS track.
You mean OCS right out of high school? Please explain.
He probably means that he got his bar through ROTC in college as opposed to being a 90 day wonder (though I'm pretty sure that idiom is no longer applicable).
No bar yet. Got 2 more years.

No, I was referencing the idea of going through 4 years of enlisted duty, and then submitting an application to enter OCS.

School, however, is ultimately the better track, for the reason that various factors could limit my service to my contracted time and nothing beyond that. This will be uncertain until I reach the end of my contract, and then the decision to continue will obviously be made then. So, maybe I'll want to pursue a civilian career (likely government, as that is why my degree (IntStds - specializing in Security and Intel)) following my time in the service. Thus that degree will be nice. But there's also the fact that I'll likely end up being the first in my family to earn a 4-year degree, so I had that notion in the back of my mind, pushing me towards school. I also, before starting school, thought I'd never want to be a grunt. But now I fear I have missed a great experience that could only improve my leadership capability.

but yes, some people could get into OCS pretty much right away, but that's a very difficult feat. But, it would have been a proving point if I could land that opportunity. However, can't have regrets in life, rather you gotta make the best of what you've done. ;)
ROTC kind of teaches us the grunt aspect first, but in a much milder setting, and without the experience gained through extensive field training. It's definitely a great organization, and our school has one of the better ones, and highly experienced Cadre that I have already learned a great deal from. I just wish I could fast forward and get into specialized training.
I really do have the mindset of a grunt (though I take control of any situation that I can, I've always naturally led rather than followed if I could) and want to deploy, but I have made my commitments.

well that felt like a blog post. But isn't that what ATOT really is? :D
 

destrekor

Lifer
Nov 18, 2005
28,799
358
126
Originally posted by: Quintox
Originally posted by: sonambulo
Originally posted by: destrekor
Sometimes I wish I skipped school and went straight into enlisted and took the OCS track.
You mean OCS right out of high school? Please explain.
Get off my avatar
you should learn to relate to, and not hate, those that share your avatar. Think of it like... forum brothers. :laugh:
 

sonambulo

Diamond Member
Feb 22, 2004
4,783
1
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Originally posted by: destrekor
Originally posted by: Quintox
Originally posted by: sonambulo
Originally posted by: destrekor
Sometimes I wish I skipped school and went straight into enlisted and took the OCS track.
You mean OCS right out of high school? Please explain.
Get off my avatar
you should learn to relate to, and not hate, those that share your avatar. Think of it like... forum brothers. :laugh:
It's a long running joke between the two of us. Don't sweat it :)

As far as the army info goes thanks for the heads up on that. I've been itching to join for a long time and everyone I've talked to says get a degree and go OCS (equivalent) in Airforce or Coast Guard but I want some goddamn action and it's nice to know that if I do decide the grunt route there is the opportunity for advancement beyond NCO should I decide to go career and manage to snag my degree in the meantime.
 

destrekor

Lifer
Nov 18, 2005
28,799
358
126
Originally posted by: sonambulo
Originally posted by: destrekor
Originally posted by: Quintox
Originally posted by: sonambulo
Originally posted by: destrekor
Sometimes I wish I skipped school and went straight into enlisted and took the OCS track.
You mean OCS right out of high school? Please explain.
Get off my avatar
you should learn to relate to, and not hate, those that share your avatar. Think of it like... forum brothers. :laugh:
It's a long running joke between the two of us. Don't sweat it :)

As far as the army info goes thanks for the heads up on that. I've been itching to join for a long time and everyone I've talked to says get a degree and go OCS (equivalent) in Airforce or Coast Guard but I want some goddamn action and it's nice to know that if I do decide the grunt route there is the opportunity for advancement beyond NCO should I decide to go career and manage to snag my degree in the meantime.
it's far from guaranteed though. OCS slots are few and hard to obtain unless you show promise beforehand. They don't want to send someone in who they believe may not pass, as that is a potential waste of a slot.

Talk to local recruiters, as well as try to talk with non-recruitment personnel who can help shed more light. My knowledge of OCS and the equivalents of the other Services is very limited... extremely limited.
 

Born2bwire

Diamond Member
Oct 28, 2005
9,840
6
71
Originally posted by: destrekor
Originally posted by: Born2bwire
Originally posted by: sonambulo
Originally posted by: destrekor
Sometimes I wish I skipped school and went straight into enlisted and took the OCS track.
You mean OCS right out of high school? Please explain.
He probably means that he got his bar through ROTC in college as opposed to being a 90 day wonder (though I'm pretty sure that idiom is no longer applicable).
No, I was referencing the idea of going through 4 years of enlisted duty, and then submitting an application to enter OCS.
My dad was an Army brat so I've learned to call them 90 day wonders. A quick look at the Army OCS site shows that the course is 12 weeks so I guess the name can still apply.
 

sonambulo

Diamond Member
Feb 22, 2004
4,783
1
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Originally posted by: destrekor
it's far from guaranteed though. OCS slots are few and hard to obtain unless you show promise beforehand. They don't want to send someone in who they believe may not pass, as that is a potential waste of a slot.

Talk to local recruiters, as well as try to talk with non-recruitment personnel who can help shed more light. My knowledge of OCS and the equivalents of the other Services is very limited... extremely limited.
I can pass don't you worry about that. All I needed was to find out that there is a potential, no matter how minute. I always find a way to make these things happen.
 

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