Predict Memory Requirements in 2025

How much ram will a standard gaming machine require in 2025?

  • 8gb

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 16gb

    Votes: 13 44.8%
  • 24gb

    Votes: 3 10.3%
  • 32gb

    Votes: 7 24.1%
  • 64gb

    Votes: 5 17.2%
  • 128gb

    Votes: 1 3.4%

  • Total voters
    29
  • Poll closed .

SimplyComplex

Member
Jul 4, 2009
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6
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So I'm about to upgrade my old 2500k to a shiny new i8400. My 2500k lasted me just about 7 years. I predicted back then that I would eventually need 16gb. So I bought 8gb at build, and upgraded to 16gb later.

This time around... I'm downgrading to 8gb. Mostly because of ram prices. But I predict in 2025 I won't need more than 24gb of ram. So a 4 slot motherboard will have me set. I get 2x4gb now, and can add 2x8gb in a couple of years once the price fixing has been addressed.

What do you think will be the ram needs of a gaming pc in 2025? VR could take us in a lot of new directions.
 

Ken g6

Programming Moderator, Elite Member
Moderator
Dec 11, 1999
16,250
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It's hard to predict. But I think 4 slots will be sufficient anyway. I also think you may need more CPU cores then than you think now.
 

whm1974

Diamond Member
Jul 24, 2016
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It's hard to predict. But I think 4 slots will be sufficient anyway. I also think you may need more CPU cores then than you think now.
Well I would say that yes he will by then, which is why I recommend a 6c/12t CPU at least.
 

Campy

Senior member
Jun 25, 2010
785
171
116
When I upgraded my old rig in 2011 I bought 8GB, which was a decent amount back then but nothing extreme. Some were getting 24 or 32 even then iirc. Today 8GB is still sufficient for gaming, albeit barely, so I'm going to predict 16GB will be the minimum in 2025, though 32GB will probably be preferable.
 

SimplyComplex

Member
Jul 4, 2009
72
6
71
Well I would say that yes he will by then, which is why I recommend a 6c/12t CPU at least.
I'm not too concerned about that. Cannon Lake at a minimum isn't going to offer standard i5 8 cores, and from what I've seen that isn't even in the cards for Ice Lake(but probably is for Tiger Lake).

But with the trouble Intel is having with 10nm, I think it's fair to say that Tiger Lake won't be before 2022. So while 8 core cpus will probably exist for normal non-power users, they're not going to be widespread or considered standard before 2025 IMO.
 

whm1974

Diamond Member
Jul 24, 2016
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I'm not too concerned about that. Cannon Lake at a minimum isn't going to offer standard i5 8 cores, and from what I've seen that isn't even in the cards for Ice Lake(but probably is for Tiger Lake).

But with the trouble Intel is having with 10nm, I think it's fair to say that Tiger Lake won't be before 2022. So while 8 core cpus will probably exist for normal non-power users, they're not going to be widespread or considered standard before 2025 IMO.
I'm thinking that the number of quad core systems will increase as the current dual core users start replacing their present rigs first, while the mid-range will go 6 cores. I highly doubt that that vast majority of users. even high ones will use more then 8c/16t anyway.
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
56,339
10,044
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I realize RAM requirements haven't been going up as much recently, although Chrome is still a hog, with many tabs.

I find 16GB to be marginally sufficient today, although on one of my boxes that mines, I'm bumping up against that limit (Commit Charge of 18-20GB).

Before answering the poll, have you all considered, that we may be on a new memory standard by then (DDR5? Start of DDR6?), and that every time that the memory standard changes, the MINIMUM DIMM size changes as well. (Have you seen any DDR4 sticks smaller than 4GB? I haven't lately. Yet, 2GB DDR3, and 512MB and 1GB DDR2 sticks exist.)

So, considering that the minimum DIMM size for DDR5 is likely to be 8GB (?), then two of those at minimum for dual-channel is going to be 16GB minimum RAM. Most people want more than the minimum, so I voted 64GB. Figure 2x32GB DIMMs, just like 2x8GB DIMMs today.

Obviously, price/GB would have to come down by then, from today's prices. Here's hoping.

Another question, is what is going to happen with DIMM-sized PCM, Phase Change Memory, like Intel/Micron's 3DXpoint. Will that be cheaper per GB than RAM is, and therefore, most PCs in the future will have a hybrid memory storage arrangement, with two RAM DIMMs, and a bunch of PCM DIMMs as additional storage? Could happen.
 

whm1974

Diamond Member
Jul 24, 2016
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I realize RAM requirements haven't been going up as much recently, although Chrome is still a hog, with many tabs.

I find 16GB to be marginally sufficient today, although on one of my boxes that mines, I'm bumping up against that limit (Commit Charge of 18-20GB).

Before answering the poll, have you all considered, that we may be on a new memory standard by then (DDR5? Start of DDR6?), and that every time that the memory standard changes, the MINIMUM DIMM size changes as well. (Have you seen any DDR4 sticks smaller than 4GB? I haven't lately. Yet, 2GB DDR3, and 512MB and 1GB DDR2 sticks exist.)

So, considering that the minimum DIMM size for DDR5 is likely to be 8GB (?), then two of those at minimum for dual-channel is going to be 16GB minimum RAM. Most people want more than the minimum, so I voted 64GB. Figure 2x32GB DIMMs, just like 2x8GB DIMMs today.

Obviously, price/GB would have to come down by then, from today's prices. Here's hoping.

Another question, is what is going to happen with DIMM-sized PCM, Phase Change Memory, like Intel/Micron's 3DXpoint. Will that be cheaper per GB than RAM is, and therefore, most PCs in the future will have a hybrid memory storage arrangement, with two RAM DIMMs, and a bunch of PCM DIMMs as additional storage? Could happen.
With DDR5 basically doubling the available amount of bandwidth and more a more effercent memory controller, I'm thinking that a CPU like the R5-2400G could need only a single channel memory to give the same or even better performance as two channel DDR4, maybe?
 

Flayed

Senior member
Nov 30, 2016
431
102
86
I can't see the minimum requirement for ram for gaming increasing to 32GB anytime in the next 10 years so I voted for 16GB.
 
Last edited:

StrangerGuy

Diamond Member
May 9, 2004
8,443
124
106
I'm on the more pessimistic side @ 16GB.

Current consumer computing products are now so good enough that future NAND/DRAM sizes are going up like TV screen sizes/4K/HDR because it's getting cheaper than ever to throw them in and not because there's a real mass demand for it.
 

NTMBK

Lifer
Nov 14, 2011
10,237
5,019
136
I voted 16GB, because the way pricing is going you won't be able to afford more than that without a mortgage.
 

nosirrahx

Senior member
Mar 24, 2018
304
75
101
People got just about everything they wanted since they could get 8GB with DDR2 in virtually all general use cases.

I am currently using 7.1/16 with a crapload of stuff open (massively cut down Windows 10, might have been more like 8 or so on a stock install).

I think that 16 GB is going to be the ceiling for the average Joe/Jane doing typical stuff.

For high end gaming the ceiling might climb to 64 GB or so, whatever 8K will require on top of the OS and game itself.


I don't think any of this matters though as persistent memory is going to be a thing and so is having your home computer being nothing more than a UI connected to the internet.
 

whm1974

Diamond Member
Jul 24, 2016
9,460
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People got just about everything they wanted since they could get 8GB with DDR2 in virtually all general use cases.

I am currently using 7.1/16 with a crapload of stuff open (massively cut down Windows 10, might have been more like 8 or so on a stock install).

I think that 16 GB is going to be the ceiling for the average Joe/Jane doing typical stuff.

For high end gaming the ceiling might climb to 64 GB or so, whatever 8K will require on top of the OS and game itself.


I don't think any of this matters though as persistent memory is going to be a thing and so is having your home computer being nothing more than a UI connected to the internet.
So what happens if you have a service outrage for all kinds of reasons? As things are right now, I can still use my computer if my internet quits working.
 

nosirrahx

Senior member
Mar 24, 2018
304
75
101
So what happens if you have a service outrage for all kinds of reasons? As things are right now, I can still use my computer if my internet quits working.

I think we will see an age of 2+ connections for everything and your devices will simply fail over to whatever the next connection is.

At a minimum people will have their cell connection and wired internet both creating a wireless signal to connect to.

Local data and apps wont go away (I sure as hell wont go to cloud everything) but for the average Joe/Jane a web connected UI is all you really need.
 

jimbotronics

Junior Member
Jul 4, 2018
12
2
41
I voted for 16Gb because of the word standard in the question, as in that will be the minimum needed for a gaming PC, but could well be 32Gb recommended for some games by then.

I've still got a 2500K, bought in 2011 with 4Gb RAM, took me until just over 2 years ago to swap it for 8Gb faster RAM.

Decided 2018 still isn't the year for a new desktop so upgraded the SSD a month ago (was getting difficult to manage the space on a 64Gb SSD!).
 

Jaskalas

Lifer
Jun 23, 2004
33,442
7,506
136
I voted for 16Gb because of the word standard in the question, as in that will be the minimum needed for a gaming PC, but could well be 32Gb recommended for some games by then.

If 16Gb recommended for anything today?
I am not aware of 8Gb being insufficient.
 

Jaskalas

Lifer
Jun 23, 2004
33,442
7,506
136
It really depends on your use cases.

Per the OP, let us assume a "standard gaming machine".

Previously I was disappointed with my old PCs 4Gb of RAM. That was 3-4 years ago. This PC has 16Gb and I cannot say I have a good feel for how many games require 8Gb or even make use of 16Gb.
 

whm1974

Diamond Member
Jul 24, 2016
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Per the OP, let us assume a "standard gaming machine".

Previously I was disappointed with my old PCs 4Gb of RAM. That was 3-4 years ago. This PC has 16Gb and I cannot say I have a good feel for how many games require 8Gb or even make use of 16Gb.
Well I started out with 16GB of DDR3 back when memory was cheap, and considering what prices are now and recently have been, I'm glad I did. Do you play AAA games? From what I read, most of the new ones can and do make use of 16GB of memory.

Of course if a games plays mostly older games and new low resource games at 1080p or lower, then a CPU like the 2200G w/ 8GB of RAM would be fine without a video card.