POLL: Who is your favorite Philosopher and why?

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thesurge

Golden Member
Dec 11, 2004
1,745
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Originally posted by: CrazyHelloDeli
Originally posted by: thesurge
Originally posted by: CrazyHelloDeli
Originally posted by: bobsmith1492
CS Lewis


Oooh good one. Cant beliveve I forgot him!

CS Lewis as in the Chronicles of Narnia author?
or do you mean
CI Lewis?


Yes, CS Lewis. He wrote many many other books than just Chronicles of Narnia all with deep, albeit religious, philisophical insights. They were also very uplifting and bright, which is very rare in most contemporary philosophy.

Narnia itself had some Christian, philosophical insight (for children literature). I just neither thought of Lewis when I think of prominent twentieth century philosophers nor have I studied him much. Could you recommend some books written by him?
 

HomeAppraiser

Platinum Member
Aug 17, 2005
2,562
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So-crates
All we are is dust in the wind, dude.
Like sands through the hourglass, so are the days of our lives.
 

Jinru

Senior member
Feb 6, 2006
680
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76
lol what a coincidence, I just finished a 2 week discussion in my philosophy class about Schopenhauer. My pick was Buddha.
 

SuepaFly

Senior member
Jun 3, 2001
972
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Gotta say Kierkegaard. When I first read Fear and Trembling, it absolutely amazed me. It's not just about faith as applied to Christianity, but faith in general. It really defined my thoughts on the subject and made me think the journey one has to take in order to be who they are to be. His ideas are abstract enough for me to refer to them in many situations

Second though, I'd say Ralph Waldo Emerson, except he wasn't as articulate about his thoughts.
 

Orsorum

Lifer
Dec 26, 2001
27,631
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Marcus Aurelius (or Zeno of Citium, if you prefer). I'm also a fan of Siddhartha Gautama.
 

grrl

Diamond Member
Jun 21, 2001
6,204
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Originally posted by: Zenmervolt
Kierkegaard, followed very, very, very closely by Robert Pirsig, with Pascal, Nietzsche, and Simone Weil running right behind.

ZV

In case you didn't see this interview with Pirsig in the Guardian.
 

91TTZ

Lifer
Jan 31, 2005
14,374
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Blackinches.

Probably the deepest and most influential thing he ever said was, and I quote: "Blackinches"

It baffles the mind.
 

Kadarin

Lifer
Nov 23, 2001
44,303
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81
Nietzsche. How can anyone argue with this quote: "Faith: not wanting to know what is true."
 

uberman

Golden Member
Sep 15, 2006
1,942
1
81
Buddah, "Desire causes suffering." Learn to be happy with what you have and what you've achieved otherwise you will be condemned by your insatiable desires to always be unhappy.
 

uberman

Golden Member
Sep 15, 2006
1,942
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Sun Tzu, "All war is based on deception." I draw on his philosophy for litigation.
 

IronWing

No Lifer
Jul 20, 2001
69,612
27,961
136
Originally posted by: Howard
Where is Ayn Rand (not that I am or am not voting for her)?

That was my first thought in reading the options - "The Randians are going to punch the OP in the face."

That being said, where is the big JC himself, you pathetic, little, atheist, commie, pinko, marshmallow-fondling liberarian?
 

mrkun

Platinum Member
Jul 17, 2005
2,189
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Originally posted by: CrazyHelloDeli

I also find his ontological reasoning behind the existance of God to be particularly compelling.

The ontological argument in all its formulations from Anselm to Malcom is a joke. It's by far the weakest "proof" for the existence of God. Why people have persisted in trying to support it for so long is beyond me.

 

Cerpin Taxt

Lifer
Feb 23, 2005
11,943
542
126
Originally posted by: mrkun
Originally posted by: CrazyHelloDeli

I also find his ontological reasoning behind the existance of God to be particularly compelling.

The ontological argument in all its formulations from Anselm to Malcom is a joke. It's by far the weakest "proof" for the existence of God. Why people have persisted in trying to support it for so long is beyond me.
QFTMFT. Sorry to the OP for veering off-topic, but mrkun quite perfectly encapsulated my thoughts on the ontological argument. It is so unbelievably asinine it confounds me that serious thinkers give it the effort and endorsement that they do.

 

CrazyHelloDeli

Platinum Member
Jun 24, 2001
2,854
0
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Originally posted by: Garth
Originally posted by: mrkun
Originally posted by: CrazyHelloDeli

I also find his ontological reasoning behind the existance of God to be particularly compelling.

The ontological argument in all its formulations from Anselm to Malcom is a joke. It's by far the weakest "proof" for the existence of God. Why people have persisted in trying to support it for so long is beyond me.
QFTMFT. Sorry to the OP for veering off-topic, but mrkun quite perfectly encapsulated my thoughts on the ontological argument. It is so unbelievably asinine it confounds me that serious thinkers give it the effort and endorsement that they do.


Well ive read quite a view refutations of ontology, I am always am interested in why people believe or dont believe what they do. So, if its not too much trouble, what have you read that convinced you of its absurdity? Im simply asking out of curiosity of whether I have read it or not.

Oh, and I added Ayn Rand.