points in the internet

Discussion in 'Networking' started by netuser786, Apr 21, 2012.

  1. netuser786

    netuser786 Junior Member

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    hi,
    i am a beginner in networking area. for curiosity i started reading about several protocols. i also tried linux terminal commands for example ping, traceroute.
    i read about traceroute that it traces the path through certain points in the internet. i wanted to know what is meant by points in internet. is it autonomous systems? any help is appreciated.

    Thanks
     
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  3. AD5MB

    AD5MB Member

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  4. Smoblikat

    Smoblikat Diamond Member

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    each point is actually called a hop. It shows the default ateway of each router youre pinging.
     
  5. imagoon

    imagoon Diamond Member

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    Hops and routes. The 2 posts above call them default routes which is incorrect except for your local router. A route and a default route are 2 distinct things with differing functions with the same end result (hopefully getting your packets to where they need to go.)

    The default route (0.0.0.0) is the route selected from the routing table when nothing else matches. Once your out on the internet you will be using route data from the routing core on the Internet currently using BGP.

    All this means is that each of those hopes show a router that has a route to the next router until you get to your destination network and eventually the node.

    You need to be careful with terms because on the Internet an autonomous system (AS) is a BGP routing element that handles all of its own internal networks.
     
  6. Ichinisan

    Ichinisan Lifer

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  7. netuser786

    netuser786 Junior Member

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    thanks to all of you, the links you have provided are a great help.

    thanks again
     
  8. Ichinisan

    Ichinisan Lifer

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    Pretty sure my link wasn't any help! :D
     
  9. JackMDS

    JackMDS Super Moderator<BR>Elite Member
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    Try this it will provide you with Visual trace.


    Download and run this freeware, http://www.d3tr.de/download.html

    Ping the server's IP using the 3D Trace.

    This the way to look at the results when using the As List view.

    http://www.ezlan.net/network/trace.jpg

    As can be seen in this trace the major slowdown is after the 6 hop which far away from the control of the user.



    :cool:
     
  10. drebo

    drebo Diamond Member

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  11. Gryz

    Gryz Golden Member

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    Lots of vague terminology used here.

    To be precises, the IP addresses you will see are the IP addresses of the incoming interface of the router at each hop along the path towards your destination. Incoming interface meaning: the interface on which a router receives your traceroute-packet.

    Small fact. TCP/IP is a little weird in addressing. Not every device has an IP address. No, every interface on every device has its own IP address. Therefor some devices can have multiple IP addresses. In general routers have multiple IP addresses, while end-systems (PCs, mobile devices, servers, etc) have only one IP address.

    To make matters more complex, you can even create "imaginary" interfaces to add more IP addresses to a device (aka loopback interfaces). Or you can assign multiple addresses to an interface (aka secondary addresses). Or you can use less IP addresses (borrowing the IP address of another interface, aka "unnumbered").

    This last paragraph was just added to confuse you. :)
     
    #11 Gryz, Apr 24, 2012
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2012