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Please review my HTPC/network scheme

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hoorah

Senior member
Dec 8, 2005
755
18
81
Get yourself something like 1/2' PVC pipe and run all the cables through it. Then get yourself a couple hundred feet of twine and run through it. Now, when your Cat6 goes bad, or in 5 years when we all start to upgrade to fiber or something else new, you can run cable with no hassle.
Good idea. To add to that, if you're opening the walls, take photos of the studs, electrical lines, and any other obstructions in the wall, so that in the future, if you want to run some new line that doesn't fit in your conduit, you'll know what you're drilling (or more importantly, not drilling) into.
 

Batmeat

Senior member
Feb 1, 2011
773
35
91
Get yourself something like 1/2' PVC pipe and run all the cables through it. Then get yourself a couple hundred feet of twine and run through it. Now, when your Cat6 goes bad, or in 5 years when we all start to upgrade to fiber or something else new, you can run cable with no hassle.
Or, you can get flexible "Smurf Tube" at least that's what we call it. Should be cheaper then pvc, which you'll have to buy the joint glue and parts to make corners and stuff.
 

SMOGZINN

Lifer
Jun 17, 2005
13,156
2,732
136
Or, you can get flexible "Smurf Tube" at least that's what we call it. Should be cheaper then pvc, which you'll have to buy the joint glue and parts to make corners and stuff.


Is this what you are talking about? Because at $1.03 a foot it not going to be cheaper then pvc even with all the fittings. PVC runs for about $0.13 a foot (for electrical conduit grade, 1 inch diameter, bought individually)
 

Aikouka

Lifer
Nov 27, 2001
29,788
522
126
Yes, you can. A network can branch off into a different subnet masks per router (allowing you to divide your network up) or you can configure a second downline router as a switch that will be transparent to the network (which is probably the best choice if your needs are pretty basic.)
I really don't think he wants to use subnet masks to divide up his network. It sounds more like he just wants to use switches to effectively act as a coupler, which is fine.

My network topology looks like this:

Code:
Router - PC1
       - Switch 1 - PC2
                  - Server
                  - Switch 4 - 360
                             - PS3
                             - Printer
       - Switch 2 - 360
                  - PS3
                  - AppleTV
       - Switch 3 - 360
                  - PS3
                  - HTPC
 

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