Please recommend me a space heater

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BUTCH1

Lifer
Jul 15, 2000
20,433
1,769
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A few notes regarding the propane, I use a carbon monoxide detector as a safeguard and the model I linked to has a built in detector, if it's gets too high the flame is extinguished automatically. Since you mentioned your house is old and drafty it won't be a problem. If you run it at say 8,000 BTU setting a tank lasts 3 days, you can keep the tank outside and just run a line into the heater but I didn't bother, propane tanks are fairly robust, just make sure your connection is tight.
 

Torn Mind

Lifer
Nov 25, 2012
11,493
2,611
136
I used a Mr. Heater propane heater (with a catalyst) in a room for a month or two. I'm still standing.
 
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BUTCH1

Lifer
Jul 15, 2000
20,433
1,769
126
I used a Mr. Heater propane heater (with a catalyst) in a room for a month or two. I'm still standing.
"Catalyst"?, I don't need no stinking catalyst!, I just strap one of these to a full tank and let her roar to life, 18,000 BTU at max output, not a great idea if kids or curious pets are around.
635-5396.jpg
 

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
30,198
10,721
136
"Catalyst"?, I don't need no stinking catalyst!, I just strap one of these to a full tank and let her roar to life, 18,000 BTU at max output, not a great idea if kids or curious pets are around.
635-5396.jpg


In case it isn't already obvious to anyone reading along here.... :oops:

DOING THIS INSIDE IS NOT A GOOD IDEA !!!


Those tanks are intended for OUTDOOR use for a good reason!

images
 

Sukhoi

Elite Member
Dec 5, 1999
15,291
82
91
Given the Berkeley climate and your environmental focus I'd highly recommend installing one or two mini split heat pumps. One for the main living space and one in your bedroom. They are vastly more efficient to run than standard electric resistance heaters.
 
Nov 17, 2019
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Given the OPs location, climate and proclivities, I'd suggest looking into heating the immediate personal space rather than the entire room. Heated blankets or throws that can be held close. Maybe even things like battery powered heated socks. Perhaps a heated vest?
iu


Battery powered, USB charging. Inexpensive enough to get two or three to keep one fully charged at most times.

There are also ways to heat passively using the Sun if you have the right window exposures.
 
Nov 17, 2019
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The wiring here is old knob and tube.

That needs to be replaced, regardless of anything else. I'm surprised you can get any kind of insurance with it.
[

QUOTE="Muse, post: 40669175, member: 61170"]
My range is gas and I prefer that to electric.
[/QUOTE]
Use it as much as practicable. You're not supposed to use them as a heat source but ..... Consider a large stock pot (10-12 quarts) of water on a low flame. The hot water will act as a heat ballast to help heat the small kitchen and you'll have hot water for coffee, tea, bullion, etc.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
37,238
7,968
136
Given the OPs location, climate and proclivities, I'd suggest looking into heating the immediate personal space rather than the entire room. Heated blankets or throws that can be held close. Maybe even things like battery powered heated socks. Perhaps a heated vest?
iu


Battery powered, USB charging. Inexpensive enough to get two or three to keep one fully charged at most times.

There are also ways to heat passively using the Sun if you have the right window exposures.
I manage in sleep time with my blankets, also wear a hoody during colder weather, a down vest too. It's wake time in cold weather that is the bigger problem. The chill can be daunting. I am set to receive my 500w "toy" heater today. The weather's turned rather spring-like all of a sudden (last 2 days now), will dip a little but come back up next week. Not unlike the last few years here, where global warming seems evident (at least locally). No telling what will happen beyond next week, though. But this weather will make even the 500w heater unnecessary!
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
37,238
7,968
136
I'm wondering... since the multiple setting heaters they're selling now seem to all have minimum 750w draw, is it conceivable to modify them to draw less, say 500w?
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
37,238
7,968
136
Given the Berkeley climate and your environmental focus I'd highly recommend installing one or two mini split heat pumps. One for the main living space and one in your bedroom. They are vastly more efficient to run than standard electric resistance heaters.
Can you link me to some stuff to give me an idea how I'd implement this? Is it a unit I simply install?
 

Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
66,960
11,917
126
www.anyf.ca
I can't vouch for them but I found these a while back: https://senville.ca/mini-split/energy-star/

I'm kind of thinking of getting one for the garage, if I get one that has 2 indoor units I could put one in my living room too, it gets very cold in that part of the house so having an extra heat source that's also green would be nice.

The nice thing is that it's DIYable so no need to hire someone.
 
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Nov 17, 2019
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A minisplit can be self install, IF you're handy enough and have the tools. They generally require a dedicated 20A circuit though. The smaller ones may not. Advantage is they're primarily for A/C with some auxiliary heating capabilities. Problem is they're generally in the $1000 to $1500 range.
 
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echo4747

Golden Member
Jun 22, 2005
1,975
153
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Given the Berkeley climate and your environmental focus I'd highly recommend installing one or two mini split heat pumps. One for the main living space and one in your bedroom. They are vastly more efficient to run than standard electric resistance heaters.

this is exactly what I would do. these units are quite efficient. As Red Squirrel mentioned they can be a DIY project. ( plenty of good installation videos are available on youtube)
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
37,238
7,968
136
I can't vouch for them but I found these a while back: https://senville.ca/mini-split/energy-star/

I'm kind of thinking of getting one for the garage, if I get one that has 2 indoor units I could put one in my living room too, it gets very cold in that part of the house so having an extra heat source that's also green would be nice.

The nice thing is that it's DIYable so no need to hire someone.
For me, it would be their smallest unit that could work, evidently, the 9000BTU. The page for it says Product Video but I see nothing there for that, no link. I'm unclear reading their online stuff how you install, where you install, what's required. I'm VERY DIY, so could probably do that. I guess I can just hit up YT and get an idea what it would entail. As stated above in this thread, I have a window AC in my bedroom with a couple 200mm computer fans right next to it in the same window. It's a nice combo. But that setup is for cooling only. I'm wondering if the heat pump could go where those are.

Um, or maybe this goes in the attic with piping into the spaces. Seems to want higher voltage than the standard 120v around here. Doable, of course.
 

ultimatebob

Lifer
Jul 1, 2001
25,135
2,445
126
I never liked the oil filled radiator space heaters. They seem to only heat a 4 foot circle of space around the heater, and that's about it.

The ones with a blower fan are better at heating a room. If you want to class up the joint, I'd recommend getting something like one of these "fireplace" heaters:


Here's a picture of one of these things "in action" over Christmas:

 

deadlyapp

Diamond Member
Apr 25, 2004
6,581
698
126
For me, it would be their smallest unit that could work, evidently, the 9000BTU. The page for it says Product Video but I see nothing there for that, no link. I'm unclear reading their online stuff how you install, where you install, what's required. I'm VERY DIY, so could probably do that. I guess I can just hit up YT and get an idea what it would entail. As stated above in this thread, I have a window AC in my bedroom with a couple 200mm computer fans right next to it in the same window. It's a nice combo. But that setup is for cooling only. I'm wondering if the heat pump could go where those are.

Um, or maybe this goes in the attic with piping into the spaces. Seems to want higher voltage than the standard 120v around here. Doable, of course.
Every house in US (generally) has capability of 240V AC, you just only wire half of it to get 120V for standard outlets and lighting.
 
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ultimatebob

Lifer
Jul 1, 2001
25,135
2,445
126
I can't vouch for them but I found these a while back: https://senville.ca/mini-split/energy-star/

I'm kind of thinking of getting one for the garage, if I get one that has 2 indoor units I could put one in my living room too, it gets very cold in that part of the house so having an extra heat source that's also green would be nice.

The nice thing is that it's DIYable so no need to hire someone.

I have a Mitsubishi Mini-split heat pump in my kitchen. It works great, but they are expensive.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
37,238
7,968
136
Last edited:

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
37,238
7,968
136
I wonder what the catch is, that is pretty cheap.... $999.

Probably no warranty or anything. But if it's the real thing and not some kind of knock off that's not bad still.
Amazon's page says the manufacturer's 5 year warranty is in effect. My ringup (if I confirm): 738.66 at amazon, USD including tax.

I'm off to Costco now, where the first thing I do is return my two Lasko CT22445 stinky space heaters.
 
Nov 17, 2019
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One other issue with the splits, is you have to have a place outside for the main unit and that's where the power needs to be. They should be on the ground, but I've seen them on shelves or platforms.

Not sure of the brand of the gizmo you're looking at.
 
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