Percentage of U.S. oil consumption imported from Middle East/Persian Gulf?

Hummin

Senior member
Dec 11, 2005
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The State of the Union address last night, along iwth Bush wanting to cut 75% of our Middle East oil consumption, got me to looking around.

Seems that while the perception is that Middle Eastern oil imports represent upwards of 50% of our total oil consumption, this is not exactly true.

Middle East/Persian Gulf imports have rarely represented over 14% of demand (consumption) over the last 24 years. Oil imports from the Middle East/Persian Gulf have hit 28% of total oil imports into the U.S. over the last 24 years and were at 18/8% of imports for the first 10 months of 2005. (Note: OPEC does NOT equal Middle East since OPEC includes such places as Venezuela, Nigeria, etc.)


Now, reducing our "dependence" on imported oil is great, and is something we DO need to do.....but focusing on Middle Eastern oil, which represents such a small fraction of our total imports (we import much more from N. American countries, Mexico and Canada, than from Persian Gulf countries) that it seems to me that the current administration is trying to rally the troops with the implied tie-in to Middle Eastern terrorism with Persian Gulf oil.

In 2005, out of the top 10 countries we imported from, only two were Persian Gulf countries.....Saudi Arabia and Iraq. The rest were N. American, S. American, African, Russia, UK.

So, cuttting 75% of 11.2% of consumption would seem to be a rather small drop in the bucket.........why not focus on our real suppliers, Canada, Mexico, Venezuela, Nigeria.....???


Jan-Oct 2005 oil import figures from DOE.


Chart, in bottom of page, of 1982-2003 US imports of Persian Gulf oil as percentage of consumption/demand and as percentage of total imports.
 

Lonyo

Lifer
Aug 10, 2002
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It's easier to strong arm immediate neighbours, plus the ME is a slightly more unstable region than Mexico or Canada.
 

Finality

Platinum Member
Oct 9, 1999
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Hes a dolt. He should really aim to reduce it to 75% of imported ENERGY forget middle east oil and whatnot. It should be reduced to imported oil.....

Its simple to stop importing Middle East oil just direct the imports from somewhere else. If US companies really wanted to they could stop take imports of Middle East oil down to 0% starting tomorrow.

Any disruption in the Middle East affects the entire world not just the US, a reduction in energy oil sources would be the ultimate step. Move energy stations away from oil and that should solve a chunk of the problems. US has plenty of coal.......


 

Lonyo

Lifer
Aug 10, 2002
21,939
6
81
Originally posted by: Finality
Hes a dolt. He should really aim to reduce it to 75% of imported ENERGY forget middle east oil and whatnot. It should be reduced to imported oil.....

Its simple to stop importing Middle East oil just direct the imports from somewhere else. If US companies really wanted to they could stop take imports of Middle East oil down to 0% starting tomorrow.

Any disruption in the Middle East affects the entire world not just the US, a reduction in energy oil sources would be the ultimate step. Move energy stations away from oil and that should solve a chunk of the problems. US has plenty of coal.......

If you're going to move away from oil, moving to renewable sources might be a better idea than looking to coal.
 

Queasy

Moderator<br>Console Gaming
Aug 24, 2001
31,796
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The problem is is that the ME is probably the most unstable region in the world and we are in a position where we can't afford to lose any oil imports.. We can count on our oil imports from most other places (with the exception of Venezuela now). More the reason to explore for oil in our own borders and off the coasts until alternative sources are found.
 

K1052

Elite Member
Aug 21, 2003
46,014
32,970
136
Originally posted by: Lonyo
Originally posted by: Finality
Hes a dolt. He should really aim to reduce it to 75% of imported ENERGY forget middle east oil and whatnot. It should be reduced to imported oil.....

Its simple to stop importing Middle East oil just direct the imports from somewhere else. If US companies really wanted to they could stop take imports of Middle East oil down to 0% starting tomorrow.

Any disruption in the Middle East affects the entire world not just the US, a reduction in energy oil sources would be the ultimate step. Move energy stations away from oil and that should solve a chunk of the problems. US has plenty of coal.......

If you're going to move away from oil, moving to renewable sources might be a better idea than looking to coal.

Coal can provide an important stepping stone to other technologies since it can be converted for use in our existing vehicles. It helps get us off the foreign tit while we develop alternatives
 

Finality

Platinum Member
Oct 9, 1999
2,665
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Originally posted by: K1052
Originally posted by: Lonyo
Originally posted by: Finality
Hes a dolt. He should really aim to reduce it to 75% of imported ENERGY forget middle east oil and whatnot. It should be reduced to imported oil.....

Its simple to stop importing Middle East oil just direct the imports from somewhere else. If US companies really wanted to they could stop take imports of Middle East oil down to 0% starting tomorrow.

Any disruption in the Middle East affects the entire world not just the US, a reduction in energy oil sources would be the ultimate step. Move energy stations away from oil and that should solve a chunk of the problems. US has plenty of coal.......

If you're going to move away from oil, moving to renewable sources might be a better idea than looking to coal.

Coal can provide an important stepping stone to other technologies since it can be converted for use in our existing vehicles. It helps get us off the foreign tit while we develop alternatives

Exactly, the tech is available today vs alternative energies that are at least a decade away from being competitive. Hydrogen will never be competitive until they find away to get it away from a zero sum gain in harnessing it.

I'd support any initiative that gets Hydrogen production viable forget about the fuel cells thats something for car makers to worry about and they are pretty close to mass producable solutions.
 

Strk

Lifer
Nov 23, 2003
10,198
4
76
Originally posted by: Queasy
The problem is is that the ME is probably the most unstable region in the world and we are in a position where we can't afford to lose any oil imports.. We can count on our oil imports from most other places (with the exception of Venezuela now). More the reason to explore for oil in our own borders and off the coasts until alternative sources are found.

Yes, because those African countries are so reliable :roll:
 

K1052

Elite Member
Aug 21, 2003
46,014
32,970
136
Originally posted by: Finality
Originally posted by: K1052
Originally posted by: Lonyo
Originally posted by: Finality
Hes a dolt. He should really aim to reduce it to 75% of imported ENERGY forget middle east oil and whatnot. It should be reduced to imported oil.....

Its simple to stop importing Middle East oil just direct the imports from somewhere else. If US companies really wanted to they could stop take imports of Middle East oil down to 0% starting tomorrow.

Any disruption in the Middle East affects the entire world not just the US, a reduction in energy oil sources would be the ultimate step. Move energy stations away from oil and that should solve a chunk of the problems. US has plenty of coal.......

If you're going to move away from oil, moving to renewable sources might be a better idea than looking to coal.

Coal can provide an important stepping stone to other technologies since it can be converted for use in our existing vehicles. It helps get us off the foreign tit while we develop alternatives

Exactly, the tech is available today vs alternative energies that are at least a decade away from being competitive. Hydrogen will never be competitive until they find away to get it away from a zero sum gain in harnessing it.

I'd support any initiative that gets Hydrogen production viable forget about the fuel cells thats something for car makers to worry about and they are pretty close to mass producable solutions.

Fission and eventually fusion are the answers to that.
 

Finality

Platinum Member
Oct 9, 1999
2,665
0
0
Fission no, fusion yes.

How many years away is true fusion though?

Cold fusion would be the ultimate but who knows if thats even possible.