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Paper is the future.

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HomerJS

Lifer
Feb 6, 2002
26,715
12,050
136
Only the best from the Republican Party on display again.

When I compare this to Kamala Harris bungling a question from Lester Holt on the border there is no comparison
 

weblooker2021

Senior member
Jan 18, 2021
309
81
61
Everything that i can have in electronic form, I do. If he is afraid of his taxes being shown to the world, maybe he should move to 3rd world country.
 

Sunburn74

Diamond Member
Oct 5, 2009
4,338
1,690
136
Trump is right. Paper records have never been leaked or stolen or altered in the history of the world and we're all stupid for moving to two factor authentication and highly encrypted data.
 

hal2kilo

Lifer
Feb 24, 2009
17,211
4,850
136
Only the best from the Republican Party on display again.

When I compare this to Kamala Harris bungling a question from Lester Holt on the border there is no comparison
She's only there because she's the right color, according to Ingram.
 

Viper1j

Diamond Member
Jul 31, 2018
3,560
2,565
106
Paper is also subject to theft, copying, forging, etc...it's not really more secure. Once again, the party of "fuck your feels" is all about feels.

Instead of progress, fall back to regress. Because fear.
And yet, some people just can't move forward. Can you say "Job Security"?


Who’s still using typewriters? The Chicago Police Department

Once a fixture in every police station, typewriters mostly disappeared with computerization. But some are still in use, says the repairman hired to keep them working.

1623324034302.png
Bebon Office Machines & Supplies at 234 S. Wabash Ave. — above Al’s Italian Beef and just south of Central Camera — repairs the last of the Chicago Police Department’s electric typewriters.

The Chicago Police Department has a typewriter repairman. Which it needs because, well, it’s still using typewriters.

“Police officers, in general, are very heavy typists,” said Keith Bebonis, the guy the police call to repair those heavy, hard-shelled relics.

“These machines are known to take abuse,” said Bebonis, whose dad started Bebon Office Machines & Supplies in the late 1960s. “I don’t want it to seem like I’m saying they’re taking their frustrations out on the typewriter. But they’re just not very sensitive with these machines.”

Bebon has had a contract to repair 40 to 50 IBM typewriters a year for the police department, along with fixing time stamps and heat sealers. The city has paid Bebon $61,275 between 2007 and February 2020 to repair that aging equipment, records show.

1623324140090.png

When you think of typewriters and cops, you might think of “Barney Miller” or “Hill Street Blues,” popular cop shows in the 1970s and ’80s. Typewriters were prominently positioned on the desks of those TV cops.

But there’s a dark side to the history of typewriters and the Chicago police. Suspects in violent crimes accused late Cmdr. Jon Burge and his “Midnight Crew” of detectives of smothering them with typewriter covers to torture them into confessing in the 1970s and ‘80s, an allegation Burge denied.

In interviews with cops including a former chief, a commander, a sergeant and a couple of beat officers, none could recall seeing anyone in the department hunting and pecking on an old IBM these days.

“Good luck finding a copper who uses one,” the commander said.

The sergeant said: “Yeah, there’s one at Homan Square on a shelf, gathering dust.”

A police spokesman said dozens of types of forms are still filled out with typewriters, including missing-person forms, towed-vehicle forms and search-warrant logs. He said the typewriters are located “throughout the department.”

The department began to wean itself off typewriters in the late 1990s, shifting cops to work on computers — a tough switch for some of them.

In 1997, Chicago cops generated nearly 1.5 million paper documents. In 1998, the department rolled out a computer system called the Criminal History Records Information System to automate its reports. It was the beginning of the end of police reports pecked out on typewriters.

Bebonis, 46, said he doesn’t know who use the police department’s typewriters these days. He said he picks up the machines in the mail room at police headquarters.

He said the department uses two kinds of typewriters: IBM Wheelwriter 6 Series II and IBM Wheelwriter 1500. The 6 Series has memory to store 15 to 20 typed pages, an early version of a word processor, and was manufactured in the late 1980s. The 1500, made in the 1990s, has only a page of memory.

“There were 25 IBM dealers in downtown Chicago selling typewriters back in the day,” Bebonis said. “There was high, high demand. We were selling 150 a month, on average, in the 1990s.”

IBM sold Wheelwriters from the mid-1980s until 1991, when it spun off its typewriter division to Lexmark, which continued to make IBM-brand typewriters until 2002.

Bebonis said his dad Bill immigrated from Greece and worked for a typewriter company in Chicago before starting his own business on South Wabash in the Loop. Bebonis worked in the family business in high school and attended college across the street at DePaul University.

The company is in a building under the L tracks at 234 S. Wabash Ave., next door to the 121-year-old Central Camera Co., which was destroyed by fire during looting on May 30. The venerable Exchequer restaurant is in the same block.

“That block is everything to me,” said Bebonis.

Decades ago, Bebon Office Machines was repairing typewriters for plenty of city agencies — aviation, fire, water, transportation and the library. The company’s oldest contract with the city goes back to 1994, according to the city contracts website. But Bebon’s only remaining city contract for typewriters is with the police department.

The business, owned by Bebonis’ mother Stella, also has a $2.5 million contract to supply copier paper to Cook County, records show.

The department’s typewriters used to be repaired every four months because they got so much wear and tear.

“People would spill coffee on them and short out the keyboards,” Bebonis said. “They were filthy.”

The typewriters don’t need much maintenance now, but parts are hard to get.

“In the Wheelwriter, the whole keyboard is on one circuit, so you can’t repair just one letter like a regular typewriter,” Bebonis said. “We used to do it in-house, but we now send it out to vendors.”

Bebonis said his family’s business has adapted as times changed.

“We evolved from typewriters to fax machines to copiers,” he said. “We’ve lasted through everything.”
 

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
32,869
11,617
146
And yet, some people just can't move forward. Can you say "Job Security"?


Who’s still using typewriters? The Chicago Police Department

Once a fixture in every police station, typewriters mostly disappeared with computerization. But some are still in use, says the repairman hired to keep them working.

View attachment 45583
Bebon Office Machines & Supplies at 234 S. Wabash Ave. — above Al’s Italian Beef and just south of Central Camera — repairs the last of the Chicago Police Department’s electric typewriters.

The Chicago Police Department has a typewriter repairman. Which it needs because, well, it’s still using typewriters.

“Police officers, in general, are very heavy typists,” said Keith Bebonis, the guy the police call to repair those heavy, hard-shelled relics.

“These machines are known to take abuse,” said Bebonis, whose dad started Bebon Office Machines & Supplies in the late 1960s. “I don’t want it to seem like I’m saying they’re taking their frustrations out on the typewriter. But they’re just not very sensitive with these machines.”

Bebon has had a contract to repair 40 to 50 IBM typewriters a year for the police department, along with fixing time stamps and heat sealers. The city has paid Bebon $61,275 between 2007 and February 2020 to repair that aging equipment, records show.

View attachment 45584

When you think of typewriters and cops, you might think of “Barney Miller” or “Hill Street Blues,” popular cop shows in the 1970s and ’80s. Typewriters were prominently positioned on the desks of those TV cops.

But there’s a dark side to the history of typewriters and the Chicago police. Suspects in violent crimes accused late Cmdr. Jon Burge and his “Midnight Crew” of detectives of smothering them with typewriter covers to torture them into confessing in the 1970s and ‘80s, an allegation Burge denied.

In interviews with cops including a former chief, a commander, a sergeant and a couple of beat officers, none could recall seeing anyone in the department hunting and pecking on an old IBM these days.

“Good luck finding a copper who uses one,” the commander said.

The sergeant said: “Yeah, there’s one at Homan Square on a shelf, gathering dust.”

A police spokesman said dozens of types of forms are still filled out with typewriters, including missing-person forms, towed-vehicle forms and search-warrant logs. He said the typewriters are located “throughout the department.”

The department began to wean itself off typewriters in the late 1990s, shifting cops to work on computers — a tough switch for some of them.

In 1997, Chicago cops generated nearly 1.5 million paper documents. In 1998, the department rolled out a computer system called the Criminal History Records Information System to automate its reports. It was the beginning of the end of police reports pecked out on typewriters.

Bebonis, 46, said he doesn’t know who use the police department’s typewriters these days. He said he picks up the machines in the mail room at police headquarters.

He said the department uses two kinds of typewriters: IBM Wheelwriter 6 Series II and IBM Wheelwriter 1500. The 6 Series has memory to store 15 to 20 typed pages, an early version of a word processor, and was manufactured in the late 1980s. The 1500, made in the 1990s, has only a page of memory.

“There were 25 IBM dealers in downtown Chicago selling typewriters back in the day,” Bebonis said. “There was high, high demand. We were selling 150 a month, on average, in the 1990s.”

IBM sold Wheelwriters from the mid-1980s until 1991, when it spun off its typewriter division to Lexmark, which continued to make IBM-brand typewriters until 2002.

Bebonis said his dad Bill immigrated from Greece and worked for a typewriter company in Chicago before starting his own business on South Wabash in the Loop. Bebonis worked in the family business in high school and attended college across the street at DePaul University.

The company is in a building under the L tracks at 234 S. Wabash Ave., next door to the 121-year-old Central Camera Co., which was destroyed by fire during looting on May 30. The venerable Exchequer restaurant is in the same block.

“That block is everything to me,” said Bebonis.

Decades ago, Bebon Office Machines was repairing typewriters for plenty of city agencies — aviation, fire, water, transportation and the library. The company’s oldest contract with the city goes back to 1994, according to the city contracts website. But Bebon’s only remaining city contract for typewriters is with the police department.

The business, owned by Bebonis’ mother Stella, also has a $2.5 million contract to supply copier paper to Cook County, records show.

The department’s typewriters used to be repaired every four months because they got so much wear and tear.

“People would spill coffee on them and short out the keyboards,” Bebonis said. “They were filthy.”

The typewriters don’t need much maintenance now, but parts are hard to get.

“In the Wheelwriter, the whole keyboard is on one circuit, so you can’t repair just one letter like a regular typewriter,” Bebonis said. “We used to do it in-house, but we now send it out to vendors.”

Bebonis said his family’s business has adapted as times changed.

“We evolved from typewriters to fax machines to copiers,” he said. “We’ve lasted through everything.”
What a weird situation.
 

nakedfrog

No Lifer
Apr 3, 2001
51,169
3,749
126
In a retarded way he has a point.
First real adult job I had was working in the accounting division of a large retailer. The office was really, really, really old building designed to fit hundreds maybe thousands of accountants and paper pusher. Even had an old sign above a then sizable storage area “tabulation room” “QUIET”. This room was at one time filled with people doing math problems regarding finances and inventory control matters.
My office was probably 2/3rds the size of a football field. Designed to hold hundreds of desks, racks upon racks of paper storage.
We had about 20-30 people working in it. With the paper (smaller receipts than the old school paper) we occupied about 1/4 the space that was originally required.
Fast forward to today and I would guess all paper would get scanned then sent to long term offsite storage. Probably don’t need more than five people doing the work we were doing in the early 90s, maybe even fewer like roll all those responsibilities into a different department or contract it out.

Going all or mostly all paper would be a huge office work boon. I could easily imagine big companies like Amazon or even something like Uber having to multiply their office staff by 20 fold maybe even more.

I wish I saved and took more pictures of the place the size and scale of the storage areas were massive. Think the warehouse were the Ark went in Indiana Jones.
Inside the building was also remarkably boring architecture. Plain, drab everything with no windows.
I don't really know that it's a "boon" to bring back tedious busywork just to have asses in seats...
 

hal2kilo

Lifer
Feb 24, 2009
17,211
4,850
136
What a weird situation.
When I worked as a contractor in the SWS maintenance building at the Bangor sub base, there used to be a typewriter shop in that building because the Navigation System used IBM typewriters for hard copy output up until about the mid 90's, when it was changed to a COTS laser printer. Finally decommissioned it, and just added more office space for work planners.
 

Indus

Diamond Member
May 11, 2002
6,790
2,309
136
Maybe he's got a point.. no more computers will stop the dominance of transgender porn sites where you can watch trans girls playing volleyball and other sports which are corrupting our youth's mind.

That shit is downright evil yo! Infact that's why it is the #1 priority of the evangelicals. Trump 2024!
 

Amol S.

Senior member
Mar 14, 2015
944
143
106
He is so dumb. As is half his base. The other half are just assholes.
His base is not the GOP supporters, but the supporters of the GQP is his base. GQP makes 55% of the GOP. The other 45% are GOP for various valid reasons, "Why does the US send money to Pakistan (specifically)" reason, or the "I came to US and earned the green-card hard way, and illegals just cross the border" reason, or the "I vote Republican because I want my vote to count, and my state never ends up Blue" reason, or the "We are sick and tired of Democrat Governor dynasties like Cuomo, who would probably win the Democrat primary, and the only way to get him out is to vote GOP for one term" reason.

So here is the breakdown of the GOP according to your post and my comments above:
45% sane GOP (not necessarily supporting Trump)
27.5% dumb GQP Trump supporters
27.5% asshole GQP Trump supporters
 

Indus

Diamond Member
May 11, 2002
6,790
2,309
136
His base is not the GOP supporters, but the supporters of the GQP is his base. GQP makes 55% of the GOP. The other 45% are GOP for various valid reasons, "Why does the US send money to Pakistan (specifically)" reason, or the "I came to US and earned the green-card hard way, and illegals just cross the border" reason, or the "I vote Republican because I want my vote to count, and my state never ends up Blue" reason, or the "We are sick and tired of Democrat Governor dynasties like Cuomo, who would probably win the Democrat primary, and the only way to get him out is to vote GOP for one term" reason.

So here is the breakdown of the GOP according to your post and my comments above:
45% sane GOP (not necessarily supporting Trump)
27.5% dumb GQP Trump supporters
27.5% asshole GQP Trump supporters
You're in NY?

Vote AOC man. Fuck Cuomo.

I'm voting her recommendation for Mayor.
 

Amol S.

Senior member
Mar 14, 2015
944
143
106
You're in NY?

Vote AOC man. Fuck Cuomo.

I'm voting her recommendation for Mayor.
If I were to go vote, I would only vote for AOC if she is the only candidate as Democrat compared to a bad bunch of Republican contenders. AOC is a bit off, I personally don't agree with the angle that she tries to support things. One reason I hate her is for driving Amazon away. I could have had a good job possibility in cyber security if Amazon was in NYC. She in fact has not so great of a margin in polls, if compared to other Democrats.
 

Indus

Diamond Member
May 11, 2002
6,790
2,309
136
If I were to go vote, I would only vote for AOC if she is the only candidate as Democrat compared to a bad bunch of Republican contenders. AOC is a bit off, I personally don't agree with the angle that she tries to support things. One reason I hate her is for driving Amazon away. I could have had a good job possibility in cyber security if Amazon was in NYC. She in fact has not so great of a margin in polls, if compared to other Democrats.
I like her because she's authentic vs establishment which is corrupt and just wants to make money off being a politician. I might change my mind if she's been in it 10-15 years but for now she's a breath of fresh air and I don't mind her mistakes.

As for Amazon I don't live in LIC but I do live in Queens so their tax subsidies would be coming out of my property taxes and to be honest we're taxed enough already. Not that I'd move to Texas but someone I know moved there and bought a house with land 4x my NYC lot and their property taxes are under a grand. Then again he has to deal with Trumpanzees and I don't.. thankfully!
 

Amol S.

Senior member
Mar 14, 2015
944
143
106
I like her because she's authentic vs establishment which is corrupt and just wants to make money off being a politician. I might change my mind if she's been in it 10-15 years but for now she's a breath of fresh air and I don't mind her mistakes.

As for Amazon I don't live in LIC but I do live in Queens so their tax subsidies would be coming out of my property taxes and to be honest we're taxed enough already. Not that I'd move to Texas but someone I know moved there and bought a house with land 4x my NYC lot and their property taxes are under a grand. Then again he has to deal with Trumpanzees and I don't.. thankfully!
If you are in an apartment .... no property tax. By the way, abandoned home lots are being bought out by building construction workers, and apartments are being erected in its place.
 

Indus

Diamond Member
May 11, 2002
6,790
2,309
136
If you are in an apartment .... no property tax. By the way, abandoned home lots are being bought out by building construction workers, and apartments are being erected in its place.
Wish it worked that way.. The rental price always has rent + property tax in the figure.. you end up paying it anyways but its not visible.

 

Viper1j

Diamond Member
Jul 31, 2018
3,560
2,565
106
I guess IBM should build new punched card readers again.
I'm old enough to remember when floppy disks really WERE floppy! (8 1/2")

1200 bps modem and a shell account that linked you to a UNIX prompt. For 5.95 a month
 
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sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
84,218
9,036
126
I'm old enough to remember when floppy disks really WERE floppy! (8 1/2")

1200 bps modem and a shell account that linked you to a UNIX prompt. For 5.95 a month

Punch cards were still in use at Kodak in the early 90s. I was working on a project to replace that. The only reason for replacement was because they could no longer source the punch card read heads...
 

Viper1j

Diamond Member
Jul 31, 2018
3,560
2,565
106
Punch cards were still in use at Kodak in the early 90s. I was working on a project to replace that. The only reason for replacement was because they could no longer source the punch card read heads...
Punchcards were still in use during DOS 5.0?
 

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