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Question Newer AMD System Randomly Crashing

rkoenn

Senior member
Aug 4, 2000
421
4
81
I built a friend an AMD Ryaen 2700 CPU, AsRock B450 motherboard, 2 8GB Viper memory sticks, an XPG 512 GB NVME SSD, and an XFX RX-560 video card in early 2020. He used it fine except for one time when it refused to boot and didn't recognize the NVME SSD. I told him to remove it and clean the contacts and after that it ran and has always booted ever since. However a couple of months ago he started getting random crashes. On some crashes he got a Windows error message that indicating an AMD driver timeout problem. He gets these randomly a couple of times a day and ALWAYS when on the internet browsing. Two weeks ago I did a clean install of Windows with the latest build and had no problems doing that at all. I then ran a stress test for an hour and it passed. I also ran a heavy 3D graphics test which ran and I verified the video card cooling fan cycled when the card got hot. On one of those I got a crash with an error message. He bought a second identical card, which he has returned, and the symptoms were the same. When I installed the clean windows I also installed AMD's latest video and motherboard drivers. Does anyone have thoughts on what is causing this and what might be done to stop it? I am wondering if the video driver updates may have started it and an earlier driver might stop it although that seems to be going backwards. Any help is greatly appreciated.
 

Belegost

Golden Member
Feb 20, 2001
1,807
19
81
I would highly recommend running memtest86+, I ran into similar crashes that seemed to point at the video driver, but, after a good week of debugging, an overnight pass of memtest found a set of bad addresses on one stick of RAM. After replacing that things stabilized fully, I can only suspect the video driver was pointed to because it was reading bad data from those addresses.
 

rkoenn

Senior member
Aug 4, 2000
421
4
81
I would highly recommend running memtest86+, I ran into similar crashes that seemed to point at the video driver, but, after a good week of debugging, an overnight pass of memtest found a set of bad addresses on one stick of RAM. After replacing that things stabilized fully, I can only suspect the video driver was pointed to because it was reading bad data from those addresses.
Thanks, that has definitely crossed my mind but I think he used the machine removing one stick at a time and still had the problem. I just asked him to try again as a memory stick problem would definitely cause such problems. I built a high end system for a friend some years back with 8 sticks of RAM. Suddenly after 3 or so years it started crashing. It was used to do heavy duty engineering number crunching and would run a simulation overnight due to the length of the run. One day he came in and it was crashed. It started repeating and it hadn't before. I tested memory two sticks at a time with memtest and finally on the last two it found a problem. Then I isolated it to one stick. The memory had a lifetime warranty so whoever it was, a big RAM maker, replaced it for free. I should have run this when I had the machine a couple of weeks ago.
 

rkoenn

Senior member
Aug 4, 2000
421
4
81
Power supply ?
It could cause some type problems but my experience is that they usually fail or don't fail. A flaky voltage would cause problems but I don't think they would manifest in a driver time out error message. Thanks for thinking of it. I've built 500+ computers starting around 1985 and power supplies are the number one failure but never this way. Number two is DVD drives. Thinking back I have rarely ever had a MB or video card fail, maybe once or twice. I have had a very rare memory stick failure but typically those are repeatable and easy to figure out but not all have been.
 

CuriousMike

Diamond Member
Feb 22, 2001
3,010
479
136
Take his video card and memory and jamb them in your system and run it for a day.
See if it fails the same way.
 
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itsmydamnation

Platinum Member
Feb 6, 2011
2,249
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I had what i thought was video card issues , ended up being needing more agressive CPU vdroop / load line calibration. CPU was fine on CPU only heavy benchmarks prime small FTT etc , Only when using GPU did it happen.

its easy and worth a shot :)
 
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Leeea

Golden Member
Apr 3, 2020
1,128
1,327
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if it is over clocked, un-overclock it

if it is xmped (which is overclocking fyi), un-xmp it.

sounds like a ram problem, memtest86 it overnight.
 
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rkoenn

Senior member
Aug 4, 2000
421
4
81
if it is over clocked, un-overclock it

if it is xmped (which is overclocking fyi), un-xmp it.

sounds like a ram problem, memtest86 it overnight.
As far as I know it is not overclocked. It is a very low stress machine just used by an older gentleman to basically do some paperwork and browse the internet. My biggest problem is I used to live one mile from him and working on it was easy. These days since I moved we are 140 miles apart and he isn't too hardware savvy so I have been trying remote troubleshooting except for when he brought it over 3 weeks back. Thanks for those suggestions. I believe he ran memtest after I told him to try that with no problems. I have resolved issues twice on high end systems I built that had a memory stick, one of eight, go bad after 3 or years and Memtest isolated it to one stick.
 

GrumpyMan

Diamond Member
May 14, 2001
5,694
202
106
Since a video card never runs at the same wattage, when gaming the more power it requires I could see it trigger or just stress a bad power supply with bad capacitors. I would try a different power supply to at least rule that out as a possible cause in your power delivery system on your mobo as a start in the diagnosing process. Also check out the caps on your mobo, rare, but you never know.
 
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rkoenn

Senior member
Aug 4, 2000
421
4
81
Since a video card never runs at the same wattage, when gaming the more power it requires I could see it trigger or just stress a bad power supply with bad capacitors. I would try a different power supply to at least rule that out as a possible cause in your power delivery system on your mobo as a start in the diagnosing process. Also check out the caps on your mobo, rare, but you never know.
Over my 30+ years building and servicing computers I don't recall ever having a power supply cause spurious problems although I know it could and respect your suggestion. They are the number one failure component from my experience with CD players number two. But it has always been a case of complete failure or no problem. That said it is something I will try if he sends me the box to troubleshoot. My first thoughts are maybe a BIOS update but research has not shown that is a complaint from owners of this MB. I am really stumped but will continue to troubleshoot it. Also he is not a gamer and this always seem to happen when on the internet browsing, I am wondering about possibly a network driver problem.
 
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