• Guest, The rules for the P & N subforum have been updated to prohibit "ad hominem" or personal attacks against other posters. See the full details in the post "Politics and News Rules & Guidelines."

New computer - should it be a laptop to desktop?

pete6032

Diamond Member
Dec 3, 2010
5,628
1,361
136
My old work computer bit the dust and I will likely be given the option of a desktop vs laptop. We typically order XPS 15s or a Precision 3450 small form factor for employees. My work consists mostly of doing work in Word, Excel, PowerPoint and some statistical software. We have extra "old" laptops at work that I could take home if ever needed. I was looking at the CPU benchmarks for the 11th gen i5, i7, i9 and they don't seem to be that different between the mobile version of the CPUs versus the desktop version. In the past I've been concerned about laptop thermal throttling with complex Excel work. Will I really get similar performance in Excel and other software with a laptop versus desktop? Also are there any other considerations I need to take into account that would make the desktop preferable to the laptop for excel and statistical software?
 

Shmee

Memory and Storage, Graphics Cards
Super Moderator
Sep 13, 2008
5,407
1,030
126
Unless you are really doing a lot of demanding calculations, I don't think you really need to worry about that CPU power that much for office work. Just make sure the computer has an SSD.
 

CropDuster

Senior member
Jan 2, 2014
332
21
81
One thing I have really gotten aggravated with since we started switching everyone to laptops is the flaky USBC docks (Dell WD15, TB16, WD19TB). Plug the laptop in and your kb/mouse or monitors may not detect, or your ethernet, or insert random other peripheral device. I think next go around I'll just get a desktop again and keep my XPS when on the road.
 

pete6032

Diamond Member
Dec 3, 2010
5,628
1,361
136
One thing I have really gotten aggravated with since we started switching everyone to laptops is the flaky USBC docks (Dell WD15, TB16, WD19TB). Plug the laptop in and your kb/mouse or monitors may not detect, or your ethernet, or insert random other peripheral device. I think next go around I'll just get a desktop again and keep my XPS when on the road.
Yes we have had two of the USB C Dell docks fail on us already. Those things aren't cheap either.
 

BurnItDwn

Lifer
Oct 10, 1999
25,756
1,259
126
Only reason id consider a laptop is for mobility.
desktop is likely the better option, even if it is an SFF.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mikeymikec

mikeymikec

Lifer
May 19, 2011
14,929
5,118
136
Only reason id consider a laptop is for mobility.
desktop is likely the better option, even if it is an SFF.
Assuming they didn't just stick laptop hardware in the desktop. I haven't seen Dell do that yet though (but then I rarely see Dell desktops these days).

@pete6032 I'd like to see these benchmarks you've seen comparing laptop CPUs to desktop ones though, for example the desktop i5s are all 6-core whereas AFAIK none of the laptop i5s are. Furthermore, cooling a i5-11600K at full tilt in a laptop is probably nigh-on impossible, even a 130W-rated standard desktop HSF couldn't keep up with it.

Unless there have been some radical and recent changes, laptop CPUs in my experience are always lower-clocked processors (and often fewer cores) than their desktop counterparts, simply because in a laptop there isn't the same cooling potential or power availability, and for the battery life not to be a complete joke. Until something like 2-3 years ago, a typical mobile i7 was a dual core with hyperthreading with a higher turbo clock. Even nowadays the typical laptop CPU clock speed is about 2GHz.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BurnItDwn

ElFenix

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Mar 20, 2000
101,667
5,988
126
Until something like 2-3 years ago, a typical mobile i7 was a dual core with hyperthreading with a higher turbo clock.
that was for U segment processors. which is 15 watts or so. there were i7s with more grunt for higher wattage classes, such as HQ at 45 watts (6700HQ 4/8 2.6/3.5)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Arkaign

Arkaign

Lifer
Oct 27, 2006
20,721
1,349
126
that was for U segment processors. which is 15 watts or so. there were i7s with more grunt for higher wattage classes, such as HQ at 45 watts (6700HQ 4/8 2.6/3.5)
That was such a scam too. "Core i7" laptop CPU literally slower than the desktop Core i3 from even a gen or two back, and barely edged from laptop Core i3, just with minor cache and clock bumps. Iirc it was due to Apple wanting to be able to brand their shoddily designed (for thermals) laptops to claim "CORE i7" when they could barely manage to house a downclocked dual core that would easily throttle under any sustained load. Then the PC industry followed that trend with 'Ultrabooks'. And of course Intel was only too happy to sell all these U dual cores under more expensive and confusing model stacks.

I feel like we're only just now achieving moderate performance characteristics for Ultrabook form factor thanks to 7nm Zens, M1 CPUs, and a smattering of Intel options.
 

Rhyalus

Junior Member
Jun 27, 2012
24
1
71
I am a big fan of laptops for work. Mobility is critical and with such powerful laptops and the ability to use multiple screens, I don’t know why you would want a desktop.

Unless you need a powerful gpu…?

Even gaming is almost the same as a desktop these days for only a bit more. I have a gaming desktop that is getting old and I just ordered an 11th gen intel cpu with a full TDP RTX 3070.

R
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY