Mexico has decriminalized...

tommywishbone

Platinum Member
May 11, 2005
2,149
0
0
Wow! I understand weed, but Coke & Smack? I don't believe what I'm reading.


Mexico to decriminalize pot, cocaine and heroin By Noel Randewich
2 hours, 59 minutes ago. April 28, 2006

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Possessing marijuana, cocaine and even heroin will no longer be a crime in Mexico if they are in small amounts for personal use under new reforms passed by Congress that quickly drew U.S. criticism.

The measure given final passage 53-26 by senators in a late night session on Thursday is aimed at letting police focus on their battle against major drug dealers, and President Vicente Fox is expected to sign it into law.

"This law provides more judicial tools for authorities to fight crime," presidential spokesman Ruben Aguilar said on Friday.

He said the reforms, which were proposed by the government and approved earlier this week by the lower house of Congress, made laws against major traffickers "more severe."

The legislation came as a shock to Washington, which counts on Mexico's support in its war against drug smuggling gangs who move massive quantities of cocaine, heroin, marijuana and methamphetamines through Mexico to U.S. consumers.

"I would say any law that decriminalizes dangerous drugs is not very helpful," said Judith Bryan, spokeswoman for the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City. "Drugs are dangerous. We don't think it is the appropriate way to go."

She said U.S. officials were still studying the reforms, under which police will not penalize people for possessing up to 5 grams of marijuana, 5 grams of opium, 25 milligrams of heroin or 500 milligrams of cocaine.
People caught with larger quantities of drugs will be treated as narcotics dealers and face increased jail terms under the plan.

The legal changes will also decriminalize the possession of limited quantities of other drugs, including LSD, hallucinogenic mushrooms, amphetamines and peyote -- a psychotropic cactus found in Mexico's northern deserts.

Fox has been seen as a loyal ally of the United States in the war on drugs, but the reforms could create new tensions.

A delegation from the U.S. House of Representatives visited Mexico last week and met with senior officials to discuss drug control issues, but was told nothing of the planned legislative changes, said Michelle Gress, a House subcommittee counsel who was part of the visiting team. "We were not informed," she said.

HARDENED CRIMINALS

Hundreds of people, including many police officers, have been killed in Mexico in the past year as drug cartels battle for control of lucrative smuggling routes into the United States.

The violence has raged mostly in northern Mexico but in recent months has spread south to cities like vacation resort Acapulco.

Under current law, it is up to local judges and police to decide on a case-by-case basis whether people should be prosecuted for possessing small quantities of drugs, a source at the Senate's health commission told Reuters.

"The object of this law is to not put consumers in jail, but rather those who sell and poison," said Senator Jorge Zermeno of the ruling National Action Party.

Hector Michel Camarena, an opposition senator from the Institutional Revolutionary Party, warned that although well intentioned, the law may go too far.

"There are serious questions we have to carefully analyse so that through our spirit of fighting drug dealing, we don't end up legalizing," he said. "We have to get rid of the concept of the (drug) consumer."

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Jmman

Diamond Member
Dec 17, 1999
5,302
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76
And you thought Tijuana was crazy before, now wait. Border cities will be like Amsterdam.......
 

Rainsford

Lifer
Apr 25, 2001
17,515
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This may be the only time I say this, but the US could learn something from Mexico. In the fight against drugs, spending time and money repeatedly busting Joe Pothead isn't going to do ANYTHING. If you really want to eliminate the drug trade, you have to go to the top. We spend the majority of our anti-drug efforts arresting, trying, and jailing some surfer in California instead of going after the people that really have an impact on the drug trade.
 

kogase

Diamond Member
Sep 8, 2004
5,213
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Originally posted by: johnnobts
cocaine and even heroin...

scary.

Why? It's not like people aren't already doing/selling it now. They just won't be clogging up jails just for fvcking themselves up.
 

charrison

Lifer
Oct 13, 1999
17,033
1
81
Originally posted by: Rainsford
This may be the only time I say this, but the US could learn something from Mexico. In the fight against drugs, spending time and money repeatedly busting Joe Pothead isn't going to do ANYTHING. If you really want to eliminate the drug trade, you have to go to the top. We spend the majority of our anti-drug efforts arresting, trying, and jailing some surfer in California instead of going after the people that really have an impact on the drug trade.

I have no problem with legalization of these drugs, as long as any crime committed while under the influence has severe penalties. Let people do what they want, but they also have to face the consequences as well.
 

BarneyFife

Diamond Member
Aug 12, 2001
3,875
0
76
Originally posted by: kogase
Originally posted by: johnnobts
cocaine and even heroin...

scary.

Why? It's not like people aren't already doing/selling it now. They just won't be clogging up jails just for fvcking themselves up.

Yeah and those same people are going to get behind a wheel and screw the innocents over. They are doing it now but when you legalize something, the prices drop, and more people get hooked. I'd rather clog up the jails than have coke fiends out in the street killing people for a buck.
 

lozina

Lifer
Sep 10, 2001
11,709
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81
good so maybe now our pot heads and criminals will sneak across the border flocking into Mexico?
 

Rainsford

Lifer
Apr 25, 2001
17,515
0
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Originally posted by: charrison
Originally posted by: Rainsford
This may be the only time I say this, but the US could learn something from Mexico. In the fight against drugs, spending time and money repeatedly busting Joe Pothead isn't going to do ANYTHING. If you really want to eliminate the drug trade, you have to go to the top. We spend the majority of our anti-drug efforts arresting, trying, and jailing some surfer in California instead of going after the people that really have an impact on the drug trade.

I have no problem with legalization of these drugs, as long as any crime committed while under the influence has severe penalties. Let people do what they want, but they also have to face the consequences as well.

Of course.
 

Ronstang

Lifer
Jul 8, 2000
12,493
18
81
The Mexican government doesn't care about the big fish in the drug trade so why should they bother with the small fish? The Mexican government openly protects the drug smugglers that come into the US and are willing to engage our Border Patrol. What would you expect from a country like Mexico. This has nothing to due with benefit to their citizens it has to do with them deciding not to waste resources when they have a crap ass economy to begin with.
 
Jun 27, 2005
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This is a cop-out of epic proportions. And a clear indication of who is in charge of Mexico.
Mexico is about to implode. I'm afraid to think of what Mexico, AZ, NM, TX & CA are going to be like a year from now.
 

Ronstang

Lifer
Jul 8, 2000
12,493
18
81
Originally posted by: Whoozyerdaddy
This is a cop-out of epic proportions. And a clear indication of who is in charge of Mexico.
Mexico is about to implode. I'm afraid to think of what Mexico, AZ, NM, TX & CA are going to be like a year from now.

We are preparing in TX.
 

sandorski

No Lifer
Oct 10, 1999
70,100
5,640
126
Originally posted by: Whoozyerdaddy
This is a cop-out of epic proportions. And a clear indication of who is in charge of Mexico.
Mexico is about to implode. I'm afraid to think of what Mexico, AZ, NM, TX & CA are going to be like a year from now.

Only small amounts have been decriminalized. Dealers and Producers are still on the wrong side of the Law. Although in Mexico it's hard to know just how far the Law will go to stop them. Mexico isn't going to implode because of this though.
 

Ronstang

Lifer
Jul 8, 2000
12,493
18
81
Originally posted by: sandorski
Originally posted by: Whoozyerdaddy
This is a cop-out of epic proportions. And a clear indication of who is in charge of Mexico.
Mexico is about to implode. I'm afraid to think of what Mexico, AZ, NM, TX & CA are going to be like a year from now.

Only small amounts have been decriminalized. Dealers and Producers are still on the wrong side of the Law. Although in Mexico it's hard to know just how far the Law will go to stop them. Mexico isn't going to implode because of this though.

The large suppliers are actually protected by parts of the government/police/military. They have openly engaged US Border Patrol here in Texas using their military Humvees with 50 cal machine guns on top. Whether it is direct government involvement or corrupt Police/Military people is of little consequence....they cannot be trusted to clean up their own problems. I have a feeling that deep down the acutal government supportst the drug trade for all the money it brings into the country.
 

eilute

Senior member
Jun 1, 2005
477
0
0
She said U.S. officials were still studying the reforms, under which police will not penalize people for possessing up to 5 grams of marijuana, 5 grams of opium, 25 milligrams of heroin or 500 milligrams of cocaine.
People caught with larger quantities of drugs will be treated as narcotics dealers and face increased jail terms under the plan.

The headline is shocking. It actually looks like they might be stiffening penalties. I have also heard that police don't arrest people for possessing 5 grams of marijuana in New York City either.
 

aka1nas

Diamond Member
Aug 30, 2001
4,335
1
0
The drug lords must have wanted to squeeze out some smaller competition. Now only drug dealers that can afford to bribe the Mexican officials will be able to sell drugs easily, thus increasing the street price due to less supply. The fact that the customers can posess legally is just icing on the cake for the drug cartels.
 
Jun 27, 2005
19,251
1
61
Originally posted by: Ronstang
Originally posted by: sandorski
Originally posted by: Whoozyerdaddy
This is a cop-out of epic proportions. And a clear indication of who is in charge of Mexico.
Mexico is about to implode. I'm afraid to think of what Mexico, AZ, NM, TX & CA are going to be like a year from now.

Only small amounts have been decriminalized. Dealers and Producers are still on the wrong side of the Law. Although in Mexico it's hard to know just how far the Law will go to stop them. Mexico isn't going to implode because of this though.

The large suppliers are actually protected by parts of the government/police/military. They have openly engaged US Border Patrol here in Texas using their military Humvees with 50 cal machine guns on top. Whether it is direct government involvement or corrupt Police/Military people is of little consequence....they cannot be trusted to clean up their own problems. I have a feeling that deep down the acutal government supportst the drug trade for all the money it brings into the country.

I don't think you have to go very deep to find the support. Mexico is a poor country. Their citizens are coming here for the promise of <$5/hr work. A drug cartel passing out millions of dollars can buy whatever legislation/protection it wants.

How quickly we forget our history. Pablo Escobar anyone? Mexico is on a very slippery slope. Give it another year or two...