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Medicare rant - its getting bad

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Matt1970

Lifer
Mar 19, 2007
12,321
2
0
So these trained people are collecting pay while waiting with an expensive vehicle and all it's gear waiting for someone to call and this service is available 24/7. So they spend what, an hour taking your mother to the hospital? Have you considered that these people aren't getting paid piecework?

Google says there are 8766 hours in a year and every one of them has someone waiting to save your mother's and others lives. You want them paid only when they are hauling people. Next time take a cab. Think of all the money you'll save.
I will be fair. Lets assume they go on 3 calls a day. That's $2880 a day, $14,000 a week, $748,000 in a year for 1 8hr shift of workers. Multiply times 3 shifts a day and that one Ambulance can pull in over $2.2 Million in a year not including weekends. After salaries (Paramedics make around $40k/year) they are pulling in a healthy, healthy profit. I am conservative and all for profits, but that is a bit obsurd.
 

TheVrolok

Lifer
Dec 11, 2000
23,265
2,530
136
I will be fair. Lets assume they go on 3 calls a day. That's $2880 a day, $14,000 a week, $748,000 in a year for 1 8hr shift of workers. Multiply times 3 shifts a day and that one Ambulance can pull in over $2.2 Million in a year not including weekends. After salaries (Paramedics make around $40k/year) they are pulling in a healthy, healthy profit. I am conservative and all for profits, but that is a bit obsurd.
You have absolutely no idea what it costs to run an EMS service, nor how it is billed.
 

glenn1

Lifer
Sep 6, 2000
25,388
1,013
126
The story you tell sounds outrageous.

Doesn't mean government isn't better thatn private insurance overall.
Agreed, and government is likely as good or better most of the time. Still, had this been a private insurance company doing this, you and other progressives here would be getting out your torches and pitchforks; but since it was government instead you shrug your shoulders and say 'Meh.'
 

rudder

Lifer
Nov 9, 2000
19,431
82
91
What you can't wrap your tiny GOP mind around my post? You forgot the REAL answer..

c) I don't give a flying fuck if you agree with me or not.
Because nothings shows you don't give a flying fuck better than replying with incoherent babble.
 

shira

Diamond Member
Jan 12, 2005
9,574
5
81
My girlfriend is involved with Medicare billing and she has daily horror stories. The levels of approval and denial of claims is mind numbing. The health care reforms are not streamlining the process, rather the government keeps rewriting the rules. It makes the tinkering with the tax code by the Congress and the IRS look like child's play.
The only effects of the health care reform bill on Medicare are:

Effective September 23, 2010

Individuals affected by the Medicare Part D coverage gap will receive a $250 rebate, and 50% of the gap will be eliminated in 2011.[58] The gap will be eliminated by 2020.

Medicare is expanded to small, rural hospitals and facilities.

Medicare patients with chronic illnesses must be monitored/evaluated on a 3 month basis for coverage of the medications for treatment of such illnesses.

Effective by January 1, 2014

Expand Medicaid eligibility; all individuals with income up to 133% of the poverty line qualify for coverage, including adults without dependent children.

Pay for new spending, in part, through spending and coverage cuts in Medicare Advantage, slowing the growth of Medicare provider payments (in part through the creation of a new Independent Payment Advisory Board), reducing Medicare and Medicaid drug reimbursement rate, cutting other Medicare and Medicaid spending.

------------------------------

From this list, it appears that belt-tightening of Medicare isn't scheduled to take place until January 1, 2014. So I'm not sure why anyone would think that the nightmare stories being reported in this thread about Medicare are due to healthcare reform.
 

TheVrolok

Lifer
Dec 11, 2000
23,265
2,530
136
I saw how it was billed. If you have some figures, do share.
If you saw how it was billed, then you know you can't simply take the cost of the call (960) and multiply it by number of calls per day like you did in your example as not all calls cost the same. It is highly variable on level of call, services rendered, time/distance of transport. This alone puts your math way off. As far as running a service, I don't have any numbers on me right now; unfortunately I haven't been involved in EMS for a little over 4 years now. However, you clearly don't grasp the cost of medical equipment, contracts, shift coverage, training, and all the other things that go into overhead if you think paramedic salaries are the big cost cutting into profits.
 

Hayabusa Rider

Admin Emeritus & Elite Member
Jan 26, 2000
50,874
4,203
126
The only effects of the health care reform bill on Medicare are:

Effective September 23, 2010

Individuals affected by the Medicare Part D coverage gap will receive a $250 rebate, and 50% of the gap will be eliminated in 2011.[58] The gap will be eliminated by 2020.

Medicare is expanded to small, rural hospitals and facilities.

Medicare patients with chronic illnesses must be monitored/evaluated on a 3 month basis for coverage of the medications for treatment of such illnesses.

Effective by January 1, 2014

Expand Medicaid eligibility; all individuals with income up to 133% of the poverty line qualify for coverage, including adults without dependent children.

Pay for new spending, in part, through spending and coverage cuts in Medicare Advantage, slowing the growth of Medicare provider payments (in part through the creation of a new Independent Payment Advisory Board), reducing Medicare and Medicaid drug reimbursement rate, cutting other Medicare and Medicaid spending.

------------------------------

From this list, it appears that belt-tightening of Medicare isn't scheduled to take place until January 1, 2014. So I'm not sure why anyone would think that the nightmare stories being reported in this thread about Medicare are due to healthcare reform.
Much of the headaches have been long standing, however Obamacare seeks to lower reimbursement rates some of which are at cost or below, while increasing the costs associated with treating the patient. When faced with this providers aren't taking new patients and that will occur an an increasing rate as time goes on.
 

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